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Elephind.com contains 5,693 items from Virginia Farm Bureau News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1951

NO. 5 IN A SERIES ON BURLEY TOBACCO TOBACCO growers and manufacturers owe a large debt to Agricultural Experiment Stations. Their research and experimentation have made the tobacco plant a better species —with less disease and improved qualities. But new problems are constantly arising that challenge the ingenuity of the research workers. The latest of these is Black Shank, a very destructive disease that has recently been spreading rapidly through the Burley district of the United States. Agricultural Experiment Stations are working constantly on the problem in order to save the tobacco industry from the destructive effects of this disease. Preventive measures have been found and work has gone ahead on developing resistant varieties for the Burley district. Already, considerable progress has been made, and with the continued efforts of the Experiment Stations, serious damage by Black Shank may soon become a thing of the past. ■ jB • 9 m ' 9 t Mm ■ J fell Burlcy tobacco stalks rotte...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1951

4 Ways-Means Committee Asks Tariff Removal On Baler Twine; Farm Bureau Testifies The Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives, having been committed to the bill involving the duty now placed on baler twine, recommended that entry, free of duty, be allowed twine chiefly used for baling hay, straw, and other fodder and bedding materials, which is commonly referred to as baler twine. All four of the major farm organizations testified to the resulting effect. The American Farm Bureau Federation played an important part in this recommendation. Following is a letter written by M. A. Hubbard, executive secretary of the VFBF, to the Hon. Burr P. Harrison, a member of the Ways and Means Committee, House of Representatives: "Your letter of July 19 in regard to the baler-twine situation is appreciated. BE SURE BE INSURED WITH A Farmers Comprehensive Liability Policy This Policy Gives You "FOUR IN ONE" PROTECTION • General Liability • Owner, Landlord and Tenant Liability • Em...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1951

September, 1951 Kenland Red Clover Gains Popularity Kenland red clover, a hardy, high-yielding variety, is becoming increasingly popular with Virginia farmers, says W. W. Lewis, associate agronomist at V.P.I. He says the variety is well adapted to that part of the red clover belt where southern anthracnose is prevalent and frequently very destructive. When subjected to heavy artificial inoculation, more than twice as many Kenland plants survive as of any other variety. New A B C's of Animal Nutrition A stands for antibiotics ... B for B-12... C for carotene . . . and so on down the new alphabet which livestock and poultry people are learning today. There's a long list of newly found aids to better health, faster growth and better gains for livestock ... to more meat for America... to better earnings for producers. A for the antibiotics —aureomycin, penicillin, streptomycin, terramycin, many more. Nobody knows quite why, but added in tiny amounts to hog, calf and poultry rations (not...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1951

6 Sussex Gathering . • . right are Mrs. Elizabeth Tucker, home agent, Watt Abbitt, delegate to U. S. House of Representatives, Fourth District, Mrs. Sol Jenkins, county chairman home demonstration clubs, Lee Holt, past president FB, and Lee Carpenter, president FB. In his brief remarks, Watt Abbitt commented on the great progress made in agriculture in the last 20 years and commended Farm Bureau leaders on their efforts in behalf of agriculture. WMm Or w 1m HL Ifl mk Hk mk Mfiimrju'" 3 H BBFK ..; \" l§ Hk Hk iflflhi *" Cumberland Picnic out from eating and speaking at the annual picnic to have their picture snapped. Back row, left to right, are: Charlie Goodman, president, Garland Clements, secretary-treasurer. Front row are directors, John Putney, Robert Blanton, and J. T. Flemming. Not pictured are Harold Duncan, vice-president, and directors, Joe Hazelgrove, Thomas Scott, and Harry Harrison. If * I will • J f fa.'• S <i Simplified Income Tax Form for 1952 ( Unofficial)...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1951

September, 1951 Leading Farmer $25 bond for being the outstanding member of the Future Farmers of America group in King George County. Presenting the bond is C. T. Graves who served as spokesman for the Farm Bureau. The prize is an annual one and a project of the King George FB. l^^^^^K-/.-:.., , - L. <#8C Wn&m^M . : "ilMs ' Jff i/Mw■|.;l ; ■ |F i -.-" .. •• y " liiil Jp ' ; Virginia Farmers Warned Against Unnumbered Tractors The Virginia Farm Equipment Association, through its Board of Directors, has warned farmers and other people buying farm equipment of the danger of purchasing tractors and other machines on which serial numbers have been defaced or removed. In recent months, the volume of reports of tractors coming into the State with serial numbers chiseled off or otherwise obliterated has steadily increased. It is believed that the reason for the increase is that many states, several of which border, or are close to Virginia, have recognized the serious...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1951

8 Prices Received By Farmers Dip For sth Straight Mofith Prices received by farmers averaged lower for the fifth consecutive month and at 294 percent of their 1910-14 average in mid-July were 2.3 percent below June 15, according to the USDA's Bureau of Agricultural Economics. As was the case a month ago, lower prices were reported for a majority of farm products, with the most important decreases occurring this month in prices of cotton, meat animals, oil-bearing crops, peaches, and oranges. Moderate increases occurred in prices for milk, eggs, most vegetables, grapefruit and apples. Costs About the Same Downturns in farm wage rates (after seasonal adjustment) and in prices paid by farmers for commodities used in production were not of sufficient importance to lower the July Parity Index (Prices Paid, Interest, Taxes, and Wage Rates) below the revised index computed for June. Living costs were steady during the month. At 282 percent of its 1910-14 average in mid-July, the Parity Ind...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

Virginia Farmers Are Entitled to Parity Vol. 12, No. 10 Rawlings Tells How FB Aids Peanut Men Bill Rawlings, executive secretary of the Peanut and Hog Growers Association of Virginia, told Farm Bureau members in Southampton county that the recent peanut legislation meant one million, four hundred thousand dollars to the farmers of that county alone. Rawlings explained the legislative process to the annual picnic group saying that the American Farm Bureau and affiliates were responsible to a great degree for the legislation which allowed the peanut acreage in Virginia to be increased over 16 and a half percent. He explained the tie between the Peanut and Hog Growers Association and the parent Virginia Farm Bureau and enumerated the ways in which the Peanut and Hog growers had worked with and through the Virginia Farm Bureau in helping accomplish the needed increase. The legislation prohibited the importation of Mexican, Indian and Chinese peanuts which brought about the additional ac...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture 99 la published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc. at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription 60# per year, included in membership dues. Entered as second-class matter February 17, 1941, at the poet office at Richmond, Virginia, under the Act of March 8, 1879. Editorial and Business Offices, 401 Lyrie Building, Richmond 19, Virginia. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers Preeident H. Guy BlaJock £* r,t District— Geo. R. Mapp, Jr. Fifth District—J. B. Altaian SecondDistriet—C. L. Carr Sixth District—R. R. Reynolds Third JMHriet —W. R. Shelton Seventh District —C. W. Sollenberger Fourth District—George Palmer Eighth District —T. T. Curtis Ninth District—C. B. Atwell President Emeritus G. F. Holsinger Executive Secretary Director of Insurance Director of Organisation M. A. Hubbard Ald en E. Flory Cullen Johnson Treasurer Office Secretary Director of Information M. A. Hubbard Mrs. Evelyn Carter A. Pick Butler Gabrie...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

NO. 1 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO TOBACCO has been an important part of our country's economic structure since colonial days. The tobacco grown today, however, has come a long way since those early times, and if the growers of that long ago period could see today's varieties, they probably would be quite surprised at the qualities, sizes, and number of types. Agreeably surprised — for tobacco in the United States has made tremendous advances since the old days and is still improving. Numerous diseases have been conquered, improved qualities have been bred-in, and more effective curing methods have come into use. These major gains of the tobacco industry can be laid, in large part, to the efforts of the Agricultural Experiment Stations, whose patient research, labor, and skill over the years have contributed immeasurable benefits to tobacco farmers. Research Makes it Possible "** to Produce Finer Tobacco The Agricultural Experiment Stations of this country have long devoted the...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

4 State Convention (Continued from page 1) Roger Fleming, is expected to be the highlight event of the session. After the address the will have the opportunity of attending a dance, round and square. Wednesday will be given to business sessions for the Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co., and the VFBF. On Wednesday morning the Associated Women will sponsor a "dutch" breakfast for committee representatives from the farm bureaus in the state. After breakfast those on the Membership, Publicity and Education, and Legislative and Defense committees will break up into separate groups to meet with Cullen Johnson, Pick Butler, and M. A. Hubbard and Mrs. C. N. DeShazo, according to the committee which they are representing. These groups will discuss some of the objectives and stumbling blocks of their individual committees. Each county is entitled to two voting delegates and one for each BE SURE BE INSURED WITH A % Farmers Comprehensive Liability Policy This Policy Gives You "FOUR IN O...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

October, 1951 Ram Sale Prices Show Gains A total of 268 rams were marketed by Virginia farmers at nine sales this year for an average price of $112 per head—an increase of over $23 over last year's price. The Hampshire breed made the largest gain over the year earlier— $33 increase. Average for all Hampshires this year was $127. Definition of a Socialist: A Communist who doesn't know what it is all about. :^'V JB Not only in the vast ranges of the Great Plains is grass creating new security and wealth. In many old, cropped-out sections a return to grass-and-livestock is restoring "faith and fertility." Areas where once livestock grazed in our great westward migration are carrying livestock again—and with yields in pounds and dollars that sound almost like miracles. Typical of the new grassland management is the operation centering at Dixon Springs Experiment Station in Southern Illinois. A few years ago this was worn-out, plowed land—practically worthlessraising perhaps 10 bushels o...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

6 Louisa Begins County. The group met last month and voted to begin a Farm Bureau organization. Left to right the officers are: T. C. Andrews, publicity chairman; A. J. Richardson, temporary chairman; H. R. Evans, secretary and treasurer; G. A. Estes, membership chairman; and L. P. Chisholm, membership workers chairman. WMBm W ■ Bljl m illili Prince George Drives ning their renewal and new membership campaign. Mr. Binford and his team enlisted eight out of nine prospects contacted, and Mr. Bresko and his team enlisted nine out of eleven contacted. Seed Directory Now Available Virginia's 1951 certified seed directory is now available from the Virginia Crop Improvement Association at V.P.1., Blacksburg. Seed Certification Agent J. Garland Sanderson says the new directory lists all growers of certified seed in Virginia. Included among those are growers of certified wheat, rye, barley, oats, soybeans, red clover, fescue, tobacco, peanuts, hybrid corn, and sweet potatoes. Only the grower...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

October, 1951 Brunswick Delegates The annual convention featured Jack Lynn as principal speaker. 'awwu- Wilkins Stresses Need For Closer Work Between Extension and Farm Organizations L. B. "Pop" Wilkins, county agent, Norfolk county, addressed the annual VPI county agents' meeting last month and called for improved public relations by county agents with all groups. In the speech, which according to listeners was as well received as any of the fine addresses during the entire meeting, Wilkins pointed out many projects and actions which could be started in order to improve the relationships now existing between the county agent and other agricultural and civic groups in the county. He said that county agents have a background of 35 years of working with all kinds of people under all kinds of conditions. A great deal of credit for Extension's being able to hold its own under such conditions and changes can be contributed to our pioneer workers who possessed the qualities of good public...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1951

8 Holsinger (Continued from page 1) the American Farm Bureau Federation. His efforts for agriculture were fruitful and in 1944 he was named "Man of the Year" in Virginia Agriculture by the Progressive Farmer publication. In addition to his fulltime duties in Farm Bureau, Mr. Holsinger gave of his time and experience to the board of directors of the State Farm Insurance Company, the Valley of Virginia Milk Producers Association and the Rockingham National Bank. Many of the policies of Virginia agriculture, which have made it comparable with any in the United States, were molded by Mr. Holsinger and others who were consulted in formulating the progressive acts and ideas. He was a man of abounding friendliness and firm convictions in matters of religion and public service. —' He was born January 25, 1878 at Timberville, the son of the late Noah B. and Lydia Geil Holsinger. On May 14, 1903 he married Miss Annie B. Burner, of McGaheysville. He received his early education in the schools ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1951

Virginia Farmers Are Entitled to Parity Vol. 12, No. 11 Farm Bureau Project Hall of Farmville. The drive for money to build the warehouse was started by the Caroline County Farm Bureau and will mean much time and money for the farmers of all sun-cured tobacco counties. Farmers will have more space for parking and will drive their vehicles inside for unloading. The warehouse will handle all unloading operations. Caroline is one of the 10 or 12 counties in the state that is conducting an active membership drive. On the last day of October, some 5,000 memberships expired in the Virginia Farm Bureau. Since that time, the counties have renewed about 1,000 of the members and the total membership to date stands near 6,000. In order to meet our goal of 10,000 the other 4,000 members were to be renewed before November 15. At present, only five of the 59 Farm Bureau counties in Virginia are over the membership quota accepted by the individual counties. These five are, Fauquier, Goochland, Gre...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1951

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture" Is published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc. at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription 60< per year, included in membership dues. En- .® 8 Bec °nd-clasß matter February 17, 1941, at the post office at Richmond, Virginia, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Editorial and Business Offices, 401 Lyric Building, Richmond 19, Virginia. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers President H. Guy Blalock „ Vies-Presidenti First District— Geo. R. Mapp, Jr. Fifth District—3. B. Allman Second District—C. L. Carr Sixth District—R. R. Reynolds Third District W. R. Shelton Seventh District—C. W. Sollenberger r ovrth District—George Palmer Eighth District—T. T. Curtis Ninth District—C. B. At well President Emeritus G. F. Holsinger Executive Secretary Director of Insurance Director of Organisation M. A. Hubbard Alden E. Flory Cullen Johnson „ Treasurer Office Secretary Director of Information M. A. Hubbard Mrs. Evelyn Ca...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1951

NO. 2 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO f: w&f jfaMgr 5ft m , mfc t HHHHHI A typical example of Granville Wilt Tobacco farmers of the Flue-cured district have long known from first-hand experience the ravages of Granville Wilt. It has plagued the Virginia and North Carolina belt repeatedly, and is present in South Carolina and Georgia as well. Bacterial Wilt, or Granville Wilt, attacks tobacco, tomatoes, potatoes, and some ordinary weeds. The disease survives in the soil indefinitely, living on the dead remains of roots and stems and on live plants. The earliest symptom is usually the wilting of one leaf, then more, on one side of the plant. Later, the whole plant wilts, and if the stalk is cut open, dark streaks next to the woody part of the stem can ba seen*running from below the soil to a foot or more above the soil line. A slimy, soft rot affects the pith and roots. For many years, rotation was thought to be the best control method, since resistant varieties were not...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1951

4 FARM LIABILITY Accidents will again take their toll in Virginia this fall among the hired help on the farms in the harvest of fall crops and fall work. A person injured because of defective or faulty equipment may be entitled by law to receive compensation for his injury. The farmer who has a Farmers Comprehensive Liability insurance policy will be protected against any such claims brought by injured helpers. We suggest you contact our office at once, or see your County Farm Bureau Agent, and add our Farmers Comprehensive Liability policy to your insurance program. ACCOMACK W. F. McCaleb, Jr.. . Craddockviile, Va. John B. Gordy Mappsville, Va. APPOMATTOX David M. Wood Appomattox, Va. Route 3 AUGUSTA Carmen S. Davis Staunton, Va. Box 72 E. D. Flory RFD, Staunton, Va. CAMPBELL C. I. Anderson Rustburg, Va. C. I. Anderson Ins. Agency CARROLL G. F. Blankenship Hillsville, Va. CHARLOTTE I. G. Jones Redoak, Va. W. L. Hammersley. .. .Randolph, Va. CULPEPER J. A. Coffey Culpeper, Va. CUMBE...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1951

November, 1951 Government Spending Pace Now Over Billion A Week {Editor s note — Congressman Ralph Harvey of Indiana, one of the staunchest champions of pay-as-we-go taxes, strict government economy and sound fiscal policies, has written the following article especially for the AFBF News Letter.) Most of us sense one fact about a billion dollars. It's a whale of a lot of money! Yet Uncle Sam is spending more than a billion dollars each and every week in this inflated year of 1952. He is determined, furthermore, to spend still larger sums for many, many weeks to come. So what, chant the unwary? Uncle Sam has got the billions, hasn't he? As a matter of simple fact —no, Uncle doesn't have it, but he has started out, via taxation, to get it, and he is going to get almost every dollar of it from you and me and the family next door. Tremendous Load Uncle Sam, champion of peace, has squared off to meet the considerable cost of waging one war, Korea; and at the same time take up the much gr...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1951

6 Membership Kickoff few of the workers discussing prospects before going out to make the contacts. Southampton now has near 300 members in their Farm Bureau. W1 W? IB ' H ' H l jjmi. , ' ifp* '*I f mßmsm lf% \ 111 ill SHMf Poultry Fed. Transcribes state. The group left to right is, Mr. Hoover, Cullen Johnson, Charles Wampler, and Ray Firestone, president of the federation. Standing is Paul Williams, editor of the Virginia Poultryman. Cullen Johnson was transcribing his regular weekly radio show on WRVA, 6:30, Saturday mornings. M IWI llfei MP' K&" WBKBmi 'fw Wj ?JmH| II ■ Wbl „ i fy# \ & mm HBlii J—— .■•/ fif % BJ— , y^^: jg |g«w ■ -v-:-'« "v . ;.2Rv lllli PRICE IT IN BLOOD Less Than Half 1950 Taxes Came From Individual Income (Editor s Note: The following editorial from the St. Louis GlobeDemocrat was entered in the Congressional Record by Representative Thomas B. Curtis of Missouri.) The Census Bureau has announced Federal tax collections alone last year a...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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