ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,070 results
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1993

April 1993 TO CUT AROUND-THE-HOME choresdowntosize Model XL (1.6 cu. in.) Model Super 2 (1.9 cu. in.) Model 240 (2.4 cu. in) Model 330 (3.3 cu. in) Model Super XL (3.5 cu. in) • Hard track or power tip • Power tip guide bar, 14" & • Power tip guide bar, 16". • Power tip, gas welded and • Gas welded, power tip and guide bar 10". 16". • Raker 111 series 37 chromed sprocket tip guide bars, 16". sprocket guide bars, 16". • Raker 111 TM series 37 • Raker 111 TM series 37 chain. • Vibration isolation. • Raker 111 series 38 chromed chromed chain. chromed chain. • CD ignition. • Automatic chain oiling. chain. • Automatic chain oiling. • Deluxe rubber-coated • Vibration isolation. • Professional style front and • Automatic chain oiling system • CD ignition. handlebar. • Automatic chain oiling. rear handguards. with manual override. • SAFE-T-TIP anti-kickback • Automatic chain oiing. • SAFE-T-TIP anti-kickback • Multi-chamber Softone TM • Throttle latch. device. • CD ignition. dev...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1993

12 Well-known VFB retiree dies RICHMOND — W.B. "Ben" Wilkinson Jr., a retired southside district field director for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, died March 19 at Henrico Doctors Hospital after a brief illness. He was 72. Wilkinson was one of the Farm Bureau's most popular and well-known employees. He held the unique distinc- tion of serving the organization in three different roles: as a county Farm Bureau board member; as an insurance advisor; and as a Federation advisor to volunteer members. He was honored with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Distinguished Service Award at VFBF's 1992 Annual Convention. Throughout his 42 years with Farm Bureau, Wilkinson kept the organization's original purpose firmly in mind—to act as a voice for Virginia farmers before local, state and federal governments. "What drew me into Farm Bureau were neighbors inviting me to join and explaining what the purpose of the organization was ... and still is," he said in a 1991 interview The purpose...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1993

April 1993 Former Farm Bureau president dies DURHAM, N.C.—Roy Benjamin Davis Jr., a former Virginia Farm Bureau Federation president and retired tobacco marketing specialist with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, died Feb. 27 at Duke University Medical Center. He was 73. At the time of his death, Davis was vice president of the FlueCured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization Corp. He was also on the executive committee of the board of directors of the HalifaxSouth Boston Community Hospital. Davis served as VFBF president from November 1956 until the fall 0f1958. During the year prior to hi i election as president, Davis had served as chairman of the VFBF Flue Cured Tobacco Committee. It was under his administration that the the committee implemented an "Improved Practices" procedure to identify tobacco which had been grown without the use of certain herbicides. Davis was named 1967 Man of the Year in service to Virginia agriculture by Progressive Farmer magaz...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1993

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $5.40 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge. member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. NO PHONE CALLS. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec ./Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (Please fill in this new classified ad form and s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1993

April 1993 IRCA regulations must be followed (Continued from Page 3) • When an employer only hires citizens for jobs, although he or she is not required to do so. • When an employer prefers and hires non-citizens rather than citizens for certain types of work. • When an employer refuses to hire a person because his or her employment eligibility document indicates that it expires at some future date. • When an employer routinely calls government agencies to determine whether documents offered by applicants are legitimate and then relies upon that information to incorrectly decide that Women learn to challenge themselves (Continued from Page 9) Southeast: Dinwiddie County, Marcia Fraser, 1992 chairman. Southwest: Smyth County, Patsy and Vicki Waddle, 1992 co-chairmen. Northern: Shenandoah County, Carol Boyer, 1992 chairman. Central District: Augusta County, Mary Frances Houff, 1992 chairman. Special recognition Special awards were made to committees making significant contributions in...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1993

Vol 52, No. 3 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS '° V April 1993 IMMBg ]r*Fmm m ii B SP^EiisflH^Sm :: «i i IMHHiI « * mmaßiMEßm j : iflflHHSHHß^ii' « t Margaret Leonard (r) and Joy Flanagan, both HjH fciaflr SfSHUI of Carroll County, admire the county Farm * ▼ hHk Bureau structure they had a hand in making. P^v The two women joined other Farm Bureau women from across the state in using Tinker f toys to team teamwork and resourcefulness t' r «Mßgg' during a workshop at this year's Statewide Women's Conference in Lynchburg |§§ March 7-9. For more on the conference, '' I \|| see stories and photos on Page 9. W «| (PtK*> by Kattry Dtoon) Sf I ► A full range of life insurance programs SSSS9 ► Some of Virginia's most competitive auto & home insurance rates HHHjiAriAuAl Complete farmowners protection I »111 !J k l l A wide range of health insurance plans Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company Early Settle...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

Farm Burcflu Vol 52, No. 4 House Ag Committee member sees eye to eye with Farm Bureau By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor LEXINGTON—U.S. Rep. Robert W. "Bob" Goodlatte, R-6th, sees eye to eye with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation on its top 10 legislative priorities. Goodlatte, Virginia's only member of the House Agriculture Committee, replaced Rep. Jim Olin, who had served on the ag committee until he retired in November 1992. Of the 10 issues Farm Bureau members presented to Goodlatte during a congressional district meeting here April 7, Goodlatte had either already signed onto supporting bills or said that he agreed with Farm Bureau-backed legislation. Opposing a decrease in estate tax exemptions, replacing the Delaney Clause with a "negligible risk" policy and passing a balanced budget amendment are among the topics covered by bills Goodlatte already supports. Legislation regarding reform of the Endangered Species Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act, called OSHA, refor...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

2 Federal spending freeze is reaffirmed as a top priority for Farm Bureau Total federal government outlays for this fiscal year are estimated by the Clinton administration to be $1,475 trillion. AtrQlion dollars is abiQion dollars times a thousand. That's a lot of money. More than you or I can really visualize. President Clinton had originally promised to balance the federal budget by limiting spending. He now proposes to significantly add to the fiscal 1994 budget by raising our taxes. Farmers would cany an even heavier load, due to proposed energy and cigarette taxes. Raising taxes will hurt everyone and do little to solve the deficit problem because spending continues to skyrocket Net interest on the federal debt is estimated to be $212 billion for fiscal 1994. Thafs 14 percent of all budgetary outlays for 1994! By comparison, the 1994 U.S. agriculture budget is slated to be $63 billion. In other words, it costs taxpayers three times more in interest than the total New Family and...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

May 1993 Commercial use of BST may cause consumer confidence crisis By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RlCHMOND—American dairy farmers fear another consumer confidence crisis in coming weeks, now that the federal government is poised to approve commercial use of a controversial dairy cattle growth hormone produced through biotechnology. The Food and Drug Administration held the last oversight hearing on bovine somatotropin, known as BST, on March 31. Scientists testified the product poses little additional health risks to dairy cattle. But several consumer advocate groups, led by extremist Jeremy Rifkin of the Pure Food Campaign, plan negative publicity campaigns about the safety of milk produced with supplemental BST. "The scientific evidence is clear, BST is a naturally occurring growth hormone in dairy cows and poses no health risk to humans," stated C. Wayne Ashworth, president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "Farmers know Rifldn and his friends will be attempting to ext...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

4 May 5: 25th Seafood Festival, Chincoteague. Call 804-787-2460. May 5: Private Property Rights seminar, Keysville. Contact John Johnson, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, 804-225-7535. May 6: Private Property Rights seminar, Staunton. Contact John Johnson, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, 804-225-7535. May 7: Private Property Rights seminar, Wytheville. Contact John Johnson, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, 804-225-7535. May 7: Virginia Poultry Federation Youth Convention, State 4-H Poultry Judging Contest, Rockingham County Fairgrounds. Contact Philip Clauer, 703-231-9185. May 7-8: Virginia Walking and Racking Horse Celebration, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Call 703-463-2194. May 8: Yearling ram sale, Shenandoah Valley Agricultural Experiment Station, Steeles Tavern. Contact Steve Umberger, 703-231-9159. May 11: Monthly Friends of the Industry of Agriculture breakfast meeting, Comfort Inn, Richmond, $7. Contact Jeb Hockman, 804-281-1000. May 12: Virginia Beef Festival, South H...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

May 1993 Production and protection go hand in hand, agronomist says By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND — Virginia Tech researchers have proven it is possible to triple crop yields while better protecting the environment—goals the farmer of the future can shoot for. Dr. Dan E. Brann, extension agronomist and leader of a highly successful intensive wheat management research program at Virginia Tech, explained this during a National Agriculture Week luncheon March 16. In the past decade, Virginia researchers have increased wheat yields from an average of 30 bushels an acre to 100 bushels an acre. Last year David Black, a Charles City County farmer, won the national wheat yield contest with a record 142 bushels an acre, which he accomplished with the help of Virginia Tech's intensive wheat management program. Brann estimated the wheat program has boosted Virginia farmers' profits by Buffalo increase in Virginia ROANOKE — Only five years after being taken off the endangered spec...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

6_ DODGEJUSTCAMEUP WITH 500 MORE REASONS FOR BELONGMG TO Yffllß HIjH^REAU. FARM BUREAU NEWS May 1993

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

May 1993 Snacking can be good for you—as long as if s low-calorie and low-fat Snadring has gotten a bad reputation nutritionally. People sometimes brag that they never eat anything between meals. But they may be doing themselves a disservice since small frequent feedings seem to be better for the body than a few large meals. One reason to eat frequently throughout the day is that skipping meals usually leads to overeating at the next meal. Digestion of a single large meal is also much more difficult than smaller, well spaced meals. A large meal requires a greater blood flow to the stomach, where if s needed for NewWellness JeanineM. Sherry, M.S., R.I). President, NewWellness Inc. digestion. This means there's less blood flow going to the brain, making you feel sluggish and sleepy. Try to include three moderate-size meals and several low-calorie snacks to All farmers will be affected by Census results WASHINGTON—If all fermere and ranchers are not counted in the Census of Agriculture...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

8 Emphasis on detecting deadly microbes in meat put on front burner By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—A Virginia Tech food scientist and the head of the state's largest farm organization both support the Clinton Administration's recent call for a stricter meat inspection program. But meat processing specialist Dr. Norman Marriott warned there will always be some bacteria in raw meat, so consumers must continue to be responsible for fully cooking the product. While Virginia Farm Bureau Federation President C. Wayne Ashworth applauded the initiative, he said farmers shouldn't be charged addi- H •• . Zrtk 4mm ' <*• -it A. < * K_ Jti £tL Jk Frank Perdue talks to a customer in a Richmond grocery store about meat inspection programs. (Photo by SheJta Hyde) Long-term care insurance helps with financial independence RICHMOND —Do you ever think about the future? Think about this: What if something happens that prevents you from taking care of yourself? Do you ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

May 1993 Virginia's finest Eighty-eight Virginia food and beverage producers participated in the first Virginia Food and Beverage Expo at the Radisson Suites hotel in Alexandria April 1. In the photo to the right, Chincoteague Seafood Co. Inc. Regional Sales Manager Brent Lessman, I, and President Leonard Rubin, r, give a customer literature about chowders and soups made in Chincoteague. Below, Ed Kerr, I, promotions director for the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, talks to Ron Mitchell, operations manager for Sam Rust Seafood Inc. of Hampton. (Photos by Norm Hyde) -'• <: 'k SSii' -^^||^ffish- • • JShhEI. jHp V ,Jj .V™ .-v ? : : 4i^'- ; 1.4i Farmers increase conservation efforts by fine-tuning farming practices KANSAS CITY, Mo.— America's farmers and ranchers are building more conservation structures in their fields and continually fine-tuning their modern farming practices to better conserve the nation's precious soil and water resources, accord...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

10 Health Insurance | • Many are no longer able to afford medical insurance because of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage. Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums. — — • ■ ■ Does Your Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Your Current Policy Provide? Virginia Coverage Policy Coverage Comprehensive Major Medical Coverage 4 r | You caii receive quality benefits for covered services. Including coverage in and out of the hospital. [_ j An Annual Out of Pocket Limit ±Jr\ The maximum amount you will personally pay for covered services in any one year is Knitted. Dental Coverage Included Prescription Drug Card # Vision Care Discount Flexibility V To use the doctor or hospital of your choice.* Low Rates %r '• A wide range of options to meet your budget needs. m Over 90 Farm Bureau Service Offices Mr and Automatic Ciaims Filing , —— We will provide you...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

May 1993 Flowering bulbs are often taken for granted Daffodils, crocuses, and other stalwart spring flowering bulbs are among the most taken-for-granted garden plants. Even with total neglect, many of them return and bloom faithfully. Hardy survivors, they hang on, giving us a welcnme "breath ofspring" year after year. As their colorful floral show winds down, many gardeners tend to forget about these reliable flowers. But the perpetual display in your yard each spring may be only a shadow of what you could see if the plants were given a little care at this time of year. Right now, daffodils (a.k.a. narcissus), tulips, and other plants which rely on underground storage organs (bulbs and corms) to produce flowers are making and storing the food reserves that will determine whether they bloom next season. For these plants to do their best, proper maintenance after flowering is very important. One little job which helps is removal of the spent flower stems promptly after blooming is co...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

12 Calendar (Continued from Page 4) Pavilion, N.C. State Fairgrounds, Raleigh. Contact Fred Bond, 919-821-4560. May 29: Aquaculture Workshop, Abingdon. Contact Phil Blevins, Washington County Extension agent, 703-628-2161. May 29-30: 34th Annual Hunt Country Stable Tour, Upperville and Middleburg. 15 stops include premier thoroughbred stables, horse breeding farms and training facilities. Call 703-592-3711. June 2-3: Estate planning for timber owners, Virginia Tech. Contact Dr. Harry Haney, 703-231-5212. June 2: Virginia Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers Board meeting, Richmond. Contact Marilyn Mandel, 804-786-2385. June 4-6: Harborfest Festival, Norfolk. Call 804-627-5329. June 5: Ashland Strawberry Fair, Ashland. Contact Mary Clair Coster, 804-798-8289. June 5-6: Vintage Virginia 12th annual "Virginia Wineries Festival, Great Meadow Field Events Center, The Plains. Contact Carrie Lehrman or Shanna Duncan, 703-827-8771. June 8: Monthly Friends of the Industry of Agriculture breakfas...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

May 1993 Alar suit getting help from Virginia farmers (Continued from Page 1) A total of $6,125 has been raised since the board made its decision. While that may not put a large dent in the multi-million-dollar suit, eveiy little bit will help. "CBS is trying to exhaust the resources of the growers," Neale said. "It would be a big blow to agriculture if they had to give up due to lack of funds." Hie suit was filed Nov. 28,1990 by the Washington farmers after the "60 Minutes" broadcast on which reporter Ed Bradley called the growth regulator, Alar, "the most potent cancer-causing substance in our food supply." Apple growers lost more than $100 million when apple sales plummeted due to the adverse publicity. During the show, Bradley called research provided by the Natural Resources Defense Council "the most careful study of the effect of Alar and seven other cancer-causing pesticides on the food children eat." Alar is not a pesticide and the scientific community at large maintains tha...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1993

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $5.40 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge. member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) * Payment MUST accompany order. > Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds. P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. NO PHONE CALLS. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept ./Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec-/Jan. issue, the deadHne is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMtt l tD by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (Ptease fffl m this new classified ad ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x