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Title: Liverpool Herald Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 29,019 items from Liverpool Herald, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HOW LIGHT TRAVELS. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

HOW LIGHT TRAVELS. Light, as a traveller, in point of rapidity is only rivalled by electricity, its speed being so vast that it IR only when we have to deal -with the enormous distanoe stretohiDg be- tween us and our finn, and the far greater ones between our system and the myriad others whioh dot our skies with the fixed stars, that appreciable periods of tho time oome in play. A rey of fight sent to us from our sus, for instance, traverse» the inter- vening space of some 05,000,000 miles in about eight minutes-that is, at the rato of over 180,000 miles per second, so that about one* eighth of a single second will suffice to flash a sunbeam right round the world if a series of mirrors could be arranged to reflect it from point to poitit ou its surface. Thia enormous spead appoars still more wocderful when we oonsidnr that light makes itn way through spaoe by means of waves, so that thc ray, by pursuing a wavy line instead of a perfectly straight ono, really travels muoh farther, an...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROYALTY AND THEIR PEARLS. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

ROYALTY AND THEIR PEARLS. Perhaps the most famous of pearl neck- laces is that of tho Queen of Italy, whioh is said not to have an equal in the world. It is'a nt okla JO in whioh are woven together all sorts of tender memories, and therefore it is greatly treasured by its owner, apart from its intrinsic) valuo and boauty. Margarita being tho Greek for pearl, au offering of those gems to his fiauooo seemed very ap» propriate of King Humber';, then Prince of Naples, and he gavo to hor a single string of pearls, eaoh the size of a hedge-sparrow's egg. Sinoe th a* timo tho King has at every birthday of his bolovod consort given hor another string of pearls, eaoh one being a little larger than the last, so that now the later strings reaoh to far below her Majooty'e waist.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHO INVENTED FELT? [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

WHO INVENTED PELT? That ia a question that even Professor Beckman could hardly answer, though we have it on his authority that felt was long; used beforo the invention of woven cloth. Felt is still the principal material for clothing; and for tenting? among tho Tartars of Central Asia, whoso modes of lifo havo continued unchanged from remote antiquity. Perhaps felt, striotly speaking, was not. invented by anyone; The nada on a fleece are but felt of Nature's ma Icing, so that felt making was hardly an original invention on the part of man, hat rather the adaptation and the ? improvement of a natural process to his own . requirements.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VARIETIES. THE WRETCHES. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

THE WRETCHES. A new nae for returned engagement rings has been found by a certain young man. He recently entered a jeweller's shop, and. after purchasing a ring for his intended, produoed an old engagement ling. Ex- plaining that tho former engagement was off, he asked that the old ring should be taken in part payment for tho new one. Another youth called at the jeweller's beforehand and explained that he was going ' to purchase a ring, saying, 1 I will bring the ? lady at two o'olook ; dou' fc show her any- thing over 60s. in value, as that's all the money I've got.'

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SEASONABLE DISHES. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

SEASONABLE DISHES. Fillets of beef with ououmber make a very good entree. Fillets from the undercut are best ; they should be an inch thiok and about two inobes square. Trim them neatly, as the trimmings will come in for a pudding or stow. Fry the fillets in boiling dripping, turning them every few seconds, until brown. Put t^em in a stowpan ; to a tablespoonful of the fat in which they have bean fried add a spoonful of flour, ono of saune, a dust of cayenne pepper, a pinch of dried sage, and half a pint of stock. Stir this over the fire until it boils and thicks, then pour it over tho fillets, cover the stewpan, and place it in the oven to simmer gently while the oucumber is cooked. Pare the latter and slice length- ways into four, cut tho strips aoross into two-inch lengths, then boil in salted water until they are tender ; they will take twenty minutes. When done drain them through a colander and pile in the middle of a hot dish, laying1 the fillets around the base, the gravy wit...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOUSEKEEPER. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

STBAJÙCED EGOS.-Ingredients: One egg, one te» spoonful of parsley, one teaspoonful of oooked hom or tongue, a quarter of an ounoe of butter. Well butter a small ramaquin-oase. Sprinkle over the butter about half of the obopped parsley and ham. Break the egg very carefully, and put it Into buttered case. Lay a emull pieou of buttered paper ovor the top. Stand it in a ntewpan, in whioh there ia about one inch, not more, of boiling water. Fut on the lid of the pan, und stand it over a slow Aro, to steam very gently, till the white of the egg ia lightly set. When done, sprinkle the remainder of the parsley and ham over the top, and serve immediately in a ramaquin oase. BnoiiflD QXTAIII.-Ingredients : One plump quail, ono round of buttered toast. Cut the quail in half. Brash it over with a h ttl o warmed butter. Wrap it up m a piece of buttered writing-paper. Then broil it over a clear fire for about ten minutes. Keep turning it over. "VS hen done, ta^e off the paper. Place tho quail on ...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A THEOLOGICAL QUESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

A THEOLOGICAL QUESTION.* Of Bishop Short, who held the See of St. Asaph, many curious stories are told. Oc- casionally he put questions to oandidates for ordination that apparently had no connec- tion with the discharge of the parochial duties. They te?ted, probably, their wit or tact, two necessary qualifications to publio ' men, but nothing more. Oao such question proposed by tho Bishop was the following : -* Whioh has tho greatest number of legs a cat or no oat ?' As might be expected this oreatod a titter, bnt the Bishop would not take a laugh aa the answer, and consequently he repeated the question and desired someone to solve tho problem. At last one of the oandidates, smiling, said: 'I öhould think,, my Lord, a oat.' . No,' retorted the Bishop, . 'there you are wrong, fora oat has four legs and no oat has five.' ,

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BEAUTIFUL QUEEN. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

A BEAUTIFUL QUEEN. Queen Natalie of Servia ÍB well-known for i her beauty, and she is especially noted for ,r her exquisite neck. Every morning she takes exercise with a pitober on her head, the result of whioh is to strengthen and beautify her neck. She is attended by a maid of honour during her morning walk, but the attendant does not walk with a burden on her head as doeB the , Queen. Other girls who want to improve the shape of their necks would do well to follow this royal lady's example, as not only , . does it tend to beautify the neck, bat also to ^straighten the back, for the head and shoulders mast be held very straight not to let the pitcher fall.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JUBILEE OF THE INVENTION OF CHLOROFORM. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

JUBILEE OF THE INVENTION OF CHLOROFORM. One of the greatest inventions for the good of Buffering humanity vraB that of chloro- form, the jubilee of whioh has just been celebrated at Edinburgh, where Alisa Eve Blantyre, the daughter of the inventor, was . presented with a ohest of silver plate and silver candelabra, as a memorial of the oo oaaion. Sir James Simpson, B.I., LLi.D., was an obscure medical praotitionor, whose great mission in life was to deatroy pain. Th« sufferings of frail humanity during am- putation« wrung his heart, and fired him with the desire to aooomphsh their allevia- tion. His invention revolutionised surgery, though it broke down Sir James in the prime of him career. Miss Simpson wrote the bio- graphy of her father. With her brother, Sir Jamos Simpson, she resides in Berwick- . shire.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GRAPE VINE. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

GRAPE VINE. The surest way of striking a shoot from a grape vine is to layer it. If 'the shoot is layered now it will be a yoong plant ready to remove in about 12 months. You may strike 'outtings by taking off yoting well ripened shoots a foot or so long with a piece of old wood at the base. Plant the outtings firmly in the ground, leaving only one bud exposed. Muloh and water in dry weather.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PROTECTING FLAT-TOPPED HEDGES [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

PROTECTING FLAT-TOPPED HEDGES Many evergreen and other hedges are trimmed with flat sides and flat tops. If the bedpe is chick, as most evergreen hedges are, tho snows of winter will collect in frreat masses upon the flat tops, the weight in many oases breaking the bushes down, with great injury to the appearance of the hedge. Where one has a beautiful wfall of this sort about his grounds it will pay to take con- siderable pains to preserve ita beauty.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MANGOLD WURZEL WINE. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

MANGOLD WURZEL WINE. Red mangold wurzel roots are the best to use. Peel and slloe thom up, to every 41b weiurht when sliood add a trallon of water, and boil till quite soft. Then take all out, strain, and return the liquor to the boiler. Add 31b of sugar to eaoh gallon of liquor, with loz of hops to 4 gallons of liquor. Plaoe the hops in a muslin bag, and boil them in the sugar and liquor for 20 minutes, then take out and strain into an open tub. "When lukewarm add a teaspoonful of brewer's yeast to each gallon. Let it stand for 2 days, ' then skim, and put it into a barrel where it is to be auowed to work, the barrel being kept quite full up to the bung- hole with some of tho liquor that must be reserved for the purpose so as to work out all the soom. When the working oeases bang down for 4 months, then bottle, and the wine will be fit to drink after it has been bottled for 4 months.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SCIENCE. TO SEAL LETTERS SO THAT THEY CANNOT BE OPENED. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

TO SEAL JLOSTTERS SO THAT THEY CANNOT BB OPENED. Steam or hot water will open envelopes olosed with mucilage and even a wafer ; a hot iron or a spirit lamp dissolves sealing wax, an impression in plaeter having been taken of the seal. By the combined use of wafer and sealing wax, however, &U attempts to open the letter otherwise than by force oan be frustrated. All that is necessary is to close the letter first with a small well moistened wafer, and to pierce the latter with a coarse needle (tho same applies to mucilage), whereupon sealing-wax may be used over in the usual manner. This Beal can neither be opened by dry heat nor of moisture.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PERSONALITIES. ROYAL LADY CYCLISTS. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

ROYAL LADY CYCLISTS. Three Boyal ladies have lately become devotees of the wheel, one of them being the ' Xlmpreas of Russia, who learned to ride while ou a visit to Darmstadt. The PrinoeBS Leopold of Bavaria, daughter of the Emperor Franois Joseph, has taken to cycling on the advice of her physician ; and the Princess Frederio Augnsta of Saxony has lately been learning to cycle for no other reason than that she, likft the rest of the world, has been infected with the all-prevailing wheeling v craze to whioh most of us succumbed long ago.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RESPIRATION. I. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

RESPIRATION. .... ., uar next duty la tbat of investigating the means st our oommand for performing the work of artificial respiration in oases of apparent death from drowning, lu order to understand dearly what is implied in this artificial breathing we must, first of all, asoertain how wo breathe in a natural fashion. It is only when we know what breathing is, regarded aB a natural funotion of tho body, that we can hope dearly to appreciate what we attempt to do in the oase of tho half-drowned man or woman. Breath- ing, or respiration, is that bodily duty whereby we tret rid of so muoh of the waste matters of the body. Those waste matters are the reault of the body's work, and they are poured into the blood from all ' parts of our frames. The blood whioh goes forth from tho left side of the heart pure to nouriuh the body, is returned to tho right Bido of the heart by the veins, and is then pumped by the heart into the lungs. Into the lungs, tho waste matters are given forth from t...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BOTTOM PRINCIPLE. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

THE BOTTOM PRINCIPLE. .NOTHING " merely happens so."_ Always keep that fact where you can see it. Whatsoever cornea to pass has an adequate canse right behind it. I don't say this aa though it were a new dis coveiy. 'Not a'bit. It is the bottom princi'pleof. nil knowledge. But we are apt to forget it that's the point : we forget it, and so have a lot of trou bte-.there's no need to have. Here is M ¡ss Esther May, whom wo are glad to I hear from, and to know. In the mattera aet forth ! in her short letter 8he speaks, hot for herself only, but for two-thirds of the women in England. " In July,'1890?' she says, ." I had an attack of influenza, which left me in a weak, exhausted condition. I felt languid and tired. Everything was a trouble to me. The good appetite that is natural to me was gone; and when I did take a little food it guve me a d rend ful pain in tho chest. There was also a strange sensation in my stomach. I felt as if I had eaten too much when perhaps I had scarcely cu to...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CORNSTALK IN BRITAIN AND WHAT HE SAW THERE. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

A CORNSTALK IN BRITAIN AND WHAT HE SAW THERE. [BY W. T. C.] One of the most interesting1 of century oki build- ings which abuts upon the Victoria Embankment, while stretching away into the Strand, is Somerset House. It is 800 feet long anti was built hy Sir William Chambers in 1770 tö 178G, upon the site of the old place bnilt by Lord Protector Somerset London smoke and grime hide its refined and perfect masonry, sculptured by such great masters as Carlini, Wilton, Bacon, Danks and Flaxman. Taken with its noble archway in the Strand, its Venetian facade overlooking the Thames, and fine proportions, this edifice is considered by competent judges to be one of the noblest in London. Within thc quad- rangle arc situated the .Government offices, chief among which are the Audit Department, office of Registrar General of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Inland Revenue and Wills and Probate office, re- moved here in 1874 from Doctors' Commons, near St. Paul's. Here all wills may be proved and ...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MODERN MIRACLES. THE DAYS OF MIRACLES ARE NOT YET PAST. SOEPTICS MAY DOUBT. SEVEN SPECIAL SURGEONS ARE CONVINCED. DR. WILLIAMS OF PINK PILLS FAME IS FORCING THIS FACT HOME IN ALL CIVILISED COUNTRIES EVERY DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

P MODERN MIRACLES. THE L>AY« OP.MIRACLES ARE NOT YET PAST. ?S0EPTI08 MAY DOUBT. SEVEN SPECIAL SURGEONS ARE CONVINCED. DR. ' ' WIÏ.LIAMS" OF PINK PILLS FA*ME IS ¡FOHOrNG THIS PACT HOME IN ALI* CIVILISED COUNTRIES 1 EVERY DAY. Dr. Williams, of Pink Pills; f>rrne¿ is fore lng tbis.fact home in all civilized countrie¡ '«very ¡day.A oise in. point, illustrating «ornes from Melbourn«. So says tb« JLdvpcate : - "The greatest and most extraordinary mirncle which has ever occurred in Victorii undoubtedly the recovery of Dave Kirk tho popular and dashing ex-champion cyclist who over a year ago, when training on thi track nt the Sootcb Collego, Melbourne, :wai hurled from his mnchine and thrown witl incredible rapidity and violence on to tb( hard ground; The tire nf his leader burst nnd thua the fateful accident xrna occasioned . Kirk was picked up from where he lny in r senseless heap, and was carried quite un- conscious to the Melbourne Hospital. Al tho many resources of that instituti...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHORT STORY. THE LOSS OF THE PHILIP HERBERT. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

. THE LOSS OF THE PHILIP . -\ HERBERT. Ja; is a true remark that Englishmen have forgotten as muoh of their naval history as would make the reputation of a lesser nation; -and there is a oar tain spedthrift grandeur about thia carelessness which of itself bears witnes* eloquently to the vast riohes of our country in past deeds of glory. "We can afford ta neglect the crumbs and remnants, yet it in well occasionally to make sure that we havo not let any deeds slip into oblivion which were better remembered. A tiny volume printed in Paris in 1693, and now growing rare, contains the story of a sea fight whioh weli deserves the fame whioh the oaprice of history has denied it. In. May. 1600, a squadron of six French ships of war, under the command of Duquesne, son of the famous sea oaptain of that name, was lying at Moniila, between the no-hern point of madagascar, and the mainland, when the news oame that an Eng- lish ship was at Au* jouam, a trading station twenty miles away. Duquesne g...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 21 May 1898

RBB Impurities of the Blood Until these purifying Pill* have had a fair trial, let no one fcc longer oppressed with the notion ¿hat his malady is in- curable. A fcvr doses will remove all disordered actions, rouse .-the torpid liver, relieve the obstructed kidneys, cleanse impure . -bio.id, and confer on every function healthful vigour. They work a thorwgh purification throughout the whole sysicm, '- without disordering the natural action of any organ. Indigestion, Bilious Complaints, and Sick Headache No organ in the human body is so liable to disorder as the .iver. Remember that when nausea, fhitulancy, or acidity on the stomach warn us that digestion is not proceeding properly. Holloway's Pills give strength to eve-y organ, speedily remove all cnusus of indigestion, inspu-ated bile, and sick headache, - and effect a permanent cure. Weakness and "Debility. ' In oases of debility, languor, and nervousness, generated by exces< of any kind, whether mental or physical, the ...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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