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Title: Queensland Country Life Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 185,984 items from Queensland Country Life, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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BUTCHERING BY ANCIENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

BUTCHERING BY ANCIENTS. The origin of the species is obscure. The earliest records of Egypt show us that cattle were used as draft animals, and that beef was the favourite meat there some time before the founding of the kingdom of Menes. That our vaunted progress after all is but comparative is forced upon our attention in observing that these ancient records depict a butcher cutting up an ox exactly as is done to-day outside of the great slaughtering estab lishments, *with a knife that he sharpened upon a steel that hung at his side, and that the cuts of meat were precisely like ours. They used leather, and they did better tanning than we do; the blood, instead of being processed into fertilizing, was used for cooking purposes; and our Spanish newly-made friends never see a better bull fight than was daily purveyed for the delectation of those ancient " sports." A little later in the world's history we find records of tricks played in the cattle trade; for do not some historians av...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

ELEGANT TOILETTE OF Linen, Voille, Muslin, Taffeta, De Laine, or any of the Soft Summer Fabrics, with Lace Incrustations and Draped Fichu; DRAWN TULLE MILLINERY HAT. Black Ostrich Feathers, Clump Black Ribbon Velvet. PRETTY TUCKED BLOUSE OF Glace, Taffeta, Mtislin, Etc. WHITE LEGHORN, Black Chiffon Lining, Foliage and Roses Wreathed round Crown. ALLAN & STARK, DIREST IMPORTERS, General Drapers, Milliners, > Tailors, Dressmakers, Etc., Queen Street, BRISBANE.

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
ROUND THE SHOPS. ALLAN AND STARK. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

ROVlflD THE SHOPS ALLAN AND STARK. THE shipments of summer goods have surpassed expectations, the materials, trim mings, etc., being beautiful beyond des cription. The light diaphanous F reach muslins, patterned in flowers (that look as if waiting to be gather ed) can be procured in the loveliest shades of Blue, Heliotrope, Lilac, Grey, Nile, Hyacinth and) Wedgewood. Manv of them have effective satin stripes crossing the lovely trailing flowers. Muslin this year will have a formidable rival in De laine. This lovely fabric adapts itself to the prevailing style of dress, and retains its fresh ness for a whole season. The designs in this material are marvels of colour and finish. Laburnum, Lilac, Autumn foliage, trails of roses are reproduced true to nature, while some have the most beautiful effects in cross bars of satin combined with a floral decora tion. They cannot fail to captivate. Ancther material, which will find great favour, is can vas cloth. This is so light, and yet so dur...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
B. G. WILSON AND CO. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

B. G. WILSON AND CO. B. G. WILSON & Co. are closing out the balance of their stock of lamps at special prices. What is called the lamp season is now near its close, so the present is the time to buy. The firm have small hand lamps from 1h to 3/6; table lamps, in glass, 1/9, up to the beautiful cut glass, tall-pillar lamp with nickel - plated plated duplex raiser burner for 50/-. Table lamps, iron stand, coloured china fount, dup lex burner, 10/6 to 25/-. Miller's centre draft circular wick, metal base, handsome china bowl, decorated with opal shade to match, 21/-. Tin wall lamps, suitable for kitchen use, 1/9, 2/6, 3/6. Hanging lamps, bronize iron frames, white opal domes, circular wicks, 20/-, 25/-, 30/- each. Hall lamps, coloured globes, circular wicks, neat and' attractive, 7/6, 10/6, 15/-, 21/- each. With the approacE of the hot weather may be expected a larger de mand for pure drinking water. B. G. Wilson and Co. have just opened up a new shipment of the celebrated Berk...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
PASTEURISED MILK FOR CALVES. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

PASTEURISED MILK FOR CALVES. A manager of a well-known Central dairy thus writes respecting the above : -During the 17 months since the opening of our creamery we have had some 200 milk suppliers on our books. This summer we were receiving about I?50° gall°ns °f milk daily, a large portion of which supply still continues. During that time, although there were complaints in neigh bouring creameries of sickness and death among calves, attributed to separated milk, with us there was not one complaint of a calf even being sick from our pasteurised milk, our calves being as good as or better than under the old system. During one fortnight, however, when we could not pasteurise owing to improve ments being in progress in our machinery, many complaints were made of scour among our calves; so much so that our suppliers threatened a revolt unless we at once resumed pasteurising. Our separated milk has also proved an excellent food for pigs. Separated milk, if pasteurised, is superior as food...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

Department of Public Lauds, Brisbane, 31st August, 1901. ATTENTION is directed to the under mentioned LANDS which will be OPEN TO SELECTION at 11 o'clock on the undermentioned dates (and thereafter) at the places named hereunder: Agricultural Farms. Monday; 30th SEPTEMBER, 1901. AT THE LAND OFFICE, IPSWICH. Portion 26v in the Parish of Neara, Portion 99v to 102v and 104v in the Parish of East Haldon, and Portion 54v in the Parish of Fassifern (being Forfeited Farms Nos. 2065, 3198, 3199, 3205, 3583, 3584 and 4851), containing areas from 26 to 200 acres, at Annual Bentals of 3d. and 4£d., and Purchasing Prices of 10s. and 15s. an acre; also (to Agricultural Farm and Unconditional Selection), abou i 280 acres of Unsurveyed Land on Occu pation License No. 56 in the Parish of Thornton, at an Annual Bental of 3d., and Purchasing Price of 10s. an acre for Agricultural Farm Selection. TUESDAY, 1st OCTOBER, 1901. AT THE LAND OFFICE, MARY BOROUGH. Portions lOOv and 138v, Forfeited Farm No. 7...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The Dairy. INDIVIDUALITY. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

ThG Dai^. INDIVIDUALITY. Take the members of any human family sitting at the same table day after day. They all show different tastes, and naturally select different combinations of the food on the table. Is it not the same with a big herd of cows? The individuals vary greatly in their tastes and habits. Here are two cows side by side. This one is thin and bony, and you cannot possibly fatten her. You might give her all the fattening foods she would eat, and still her bones would show. The other is naturally disposed to lay on flesh, and extra feeding would ruin her as a dairy animal. You can see from this how necessary it is to study cows as individuals if we are to feed them to the best advantage, both as re gards economy of food and quality of milk. FEEDING. Foods may be divided into two classes heat-makers and flesh-formers-and if the natural demands of the cow are to be con sidered, she needs 4ft) of heat and fat-forming material to' iSb of the flesh and blood makers. So., agai...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

SYMPHONY, The Best Self=playing Organ ever produced at the price, that brings it within reach of all. Anyone can play it Without Knowledge of Music. . . . It will play any music ever written. . Suitable for the Private House. Will play Dance, Popular, Operatic, as well as Sacred Music. ______ _ »"i -,i l'i " j "J',=r a. " sis ^ _ -, , - S ? i"i S" n="!, "T" r HHKf! mssmmssm i =-h ? .. - i> - . i . r ---! .%.?» r^r3 - - ,EptO";r i; ~~s~- - " ' '. yjj- >jA',-<. _ f - " fe^^:ni^Sls"Hlii{{i|ijj{§!f{{j|;jj||;j:p;;jjjjyj{jpig^ -j~ - - .Jy'f'j. - - ' i K . : Price: From £25 to £300, Cash or Terms. Come in, hear it, or send for Catalogues. The Latest Improved . . . GRAMOPHONE. Price: Prom £2 15s. to £12 12s. Records, 3s. each. 4'* All the latest Operatic Selections, Comic Songs, See., PIANO AND MUSIC ij WAREHOUSE, 233, 235 Elizabeth Street (Opposite Police Court), BRISBANE. <&h *t.«f ?"* _. .h** it >

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
MANURES. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

MANURES. Saving Barnyard Manure.-The bulk, solu bility, and peculiar tendency to fermentation of barn-yard manure, renders it a matter of no little study so to arrange it as to preserve all its good qualities, and apply it undiminished to the soil. A part of the droppings of the cattle are necessarily left in the pasture, or about the stacks where they are fed; though it is better, for the various reasons, that they, should never receive their food from the stack. The manure thus left in the field should be beaten up and scattered with light, long handled mallets, immediately after the grass starts in the spring, and again before the rains in the autumn. With these exceptions, and the slight waste which may occur in driving cattle to and from the pasture, all the manure should be dropped either in the stables or in the yards. These should be so arranged that cat tle may pass from one directly in to the other; and the yard should, if possible, be furnished with wells, cisterns, or ru...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
ROSES. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

ROSES. (By J. Duncan, Yaamba). Pillar Roses.-To ornament a garden, there is no kind of shrub, however beautiful, so well adapted to take various forms as the rose. It can be used as a dwarf to fill the smallest . beds, as a bush to plant among evergreens, and as a tall standard to form avenues of roses on each side of a walk. In the centre of larger circular beds it is often planted in groups, with half-standards around, and dwarfs in the front, thus forming an amphitheatre of roses, which, when in bloom, is one of the finest sights in the floral garden; as climbers, to ornament the villa, or the more humble abode of the cottager; and to plant against bare walls and1 palings, forming drooping shrubs, when budded on high standards, wav ing gracefully their boughs, laden with frar grance and bloom, in the warm gales of sum mer and autumn. What can be more desir able? All these forms are certainly very pleasing, and, however elegant their appear ance, still, none of them show off the b...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

IMPORTANT Ti una1 miers mi hpiiths art all liftmM In telnlnn. We have the pleasure to remind you that "PRESERVITAS" IS STILL THE LEADING PRESERVATIVE IN THE AUSTRALASIAN COLONIES, and that, while admitting that one of its ingredients is Boracic Acid, we assert that any deleterious effects conveyed by that acid is Neutralized by the Special and Scientific Process under which " Preservitas " is manufactured, and we hold a Certificate to that effect from The Highest Chemical Authority in Great Britain. We would ^A/arn You against the use of Low Priced Preservatives. A Committee appointed by the House of Commons is now sitting in London to enquire into the. use of Preservatives, and their decision is certain to be Against the Over-USe of Boracic Acid. As Boracic Acid in a crude state is the prevailing feature in the Supposed Cheap Preservatives now on the market they will be condemned, while, on the other hand, " Preservitas" being a properly manufactured Article is likely to be The Rec...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
SEED TO THE ACRE. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

SEED TO THE ACRE. » The opinions of farmers differ materially; and then the climate and soil have much to doi with the quantity. The quantity of seed sown broadcast to the acre, is about as fol lows : Wheat i J to 2 bushels. Barley i| to 2 J " Oats 2 to 4 " Rye ... 1 to 2 " Buckwheat f to ij " Millet 1 to i| " Indian Corn 1 to 2 " Beans 2 to 3 " Peas 2J to si " Hemp 1 to i\ Flax J to 2 Timothy 12 to 24 quarts. Mustard 8 to 20 " Redtop 12 to 16 " Flat Turnip .. 2 to 3 lbs. Red Clover 10 to> 16 " White Clover .3 to 4 " Kentucky Blue Grass 10 to 15 " Orchard1 Grass 20 to 30 " The quantity per acre, when planted in rows, in drills, is about thus : Broom Corn 1 to bushels. Beans to 2 " Peas 1J to 2 " Peanuts 1 to 2 " Onions 4 to 5 lbs. Carrots 2 to 2J " Parsnips 4 to 5 " Beets 4 to 6 " To Rid a Barn of Rats.-Place a water tight barrel in a dark corner, making; the top accessible to the rats by setting boxes near it, or placing boards or poles so that they may climb up. The head is tak...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
NUMBER OF TREES ON AN ACRE. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

NUMBER OF TREES ON AN ACRE. 4 feet apart ..2720 5 » » ..1749 6 JJ JJ . . X200 8 " " . . 689 » » *. 43® J, )) .. 325 15 feet apart .. 200 » »> . . 135, 20 ff ff . . 110 22 " ,, .. jo 3° « »f . . SH

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
WHEN AND HOW TO PLANT CORN. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

WHEN AND HOW TO PLANT CORN. BY JOHN M. STAHL. Of all men, the one who plants corn should heed the injunction to make haste slowly. Nothing is gained by planting com before the ground is warm. At times the season is quite backward, and yet oftener spring seems to be lingering far too long in old winter's lap, but nevertheless the earliest moment for corn planting is when the ground is warm. It is not enough that the sun be warm, or even that the air be warm; the ground must be warm, and for a depth of at least four inches below the surface. Corn planted in cold ground will be passed and surpassed by corn planted in warm ground ten days or a week later. The latter will germinate much better, germination) will be quicker. The plants will be active and sturdy, will grow fast and stocky. If the grains are put into cold ground those of the weaker vitality will not germinate, and those that do germinate will tend to produce weakly plants. Sometimes it requires the exercise of not a little ...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Increase of Population. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

Increase of Population. The recent simultaneous taking of the census in some of the principal. countries of the world gives the following results: - 1901. 294,000,000 76,295,220 56,345,014 32,449,000 32,525,716 4>47M57 3>777>212 773*439 4,456,546 5°5>°93>4°4 Stock your garden well with small fruits. No farm should be without a well-kept, well stocked garden. Make a careful selection of only the best garden seeds. The garden should be kept perfectly free from weeds. Let the farmer not forget the hungry soil when he thinks of the appetite of his family. Quality, not quantity, tells in the case of manure, as in the case of other farm articles. Generally the nearer home a product can be marketed, the more profitable it will be. It is easier to make good land on a farm where there is stock, than on a farm given over to wheat raising. The area occupied by wood lands in Great Britain increased from 2,458,000 acres in 1881, to 2,695,000 in 1891. 1891. India .. .. 287,000,000 ...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The New Pastoral Bill. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

The New Pastoral Bill. ri<Myva $OR some time past the pastoral posi tion in Queensland has been causing great anxiety to those who are more immediately connected with it. The enormous losses of stock through the drought, tpgether with the large expenditure of money which has had to be incurred in order to save those that are alive, has produced such a bad condition of affairs in this industry that it will take it some time to recover from the blow. The Losses in Stock. When we take into consideration the fact that there are at the present only about ten millions of sheep and four and a half millions of cattle in the State, as compared with over fifteen millions of sheep and five millions of cattle as at 1st January, 1900, or a decrease of over five millions of sheep and half a million of cattle, it can be easily understood that such losses must produce a bad effect upon the general prosperity of the country. The Loss In Wages. The loss in wages to shearers, station hands,...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
ON SOWS. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

ON SOWS. The number of wihch a sow should be allowed to have before she is fattened for butchering depends on the animal herself. When a young sow has only four or five pigs, or shows herself to be a poor milker, or a careless and indifferent mother, the sooner she is fattened the better; but if she does fairly well, she should be given a second trial. The second litter is usually larger than the first. If she then proves a good mother, and her pigs from both litters develop into good porkers, she should be kept as a breeder until she can be replaced by a more pro lific and better animal. An old sow which regularly raises large litters of good pigs is worth a dozen un tried gilts. An aged sow mated with a young boar will produce pigs which will mature earlier than those produced when the sow is young and the boar aged, which is a strong argument in favour of keeping a sow as long as she continues to breed satisfactorily. Ordinarly, sows cease to be profitable breeders after they are...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
FISHINESS IN BUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

FISHINESS IN BUTTER. Mr. M. A. 0'Callagha», the dairy expert, New South Wales, in his annual report makes the following remarks anent " fishy" butter: - " The cables from London tell us that a con siderable number of complaints have been re ceived of ' fishiness' in Australian butter ; and this is not to be wondered at. A couple of months ago, when the first intimation of * fishi ness' was received, I made investigations at some of our separating stations, which went to show that the organism which, in my opinion, causes 1 fishy' butter, overruled everything else present in some of these factories. Shall we be surprised at this when I state that though some of these separating stations have been in existence for 10 years, they have never received a coat of lime-wash or any other substance which would serve to destroy injurious micro organisms. I have no doubt whatever but that ' fishiness' in butter is due to the action of a micro-organism, and in some of these factories, though the...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Field, Orchard and Garden. FOR SEPTEMBER. FLOWER GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

-\ Field, Orchard and Garden. FOR SEPTEMBER. (By Mr. Jas. Mitchell, Bowen Park.) FLOWER GARDEN. Now is the time to repair, level, and fill up holes in, the lawn; the sun is working round, and its influence will soon be felt amongst all plants and vegtable life which glory in its full summer rays. This is a good month to lay turf, plant grasses, or sow couch grass seed. Sow the seed on the roughly-raked lawn; after planting pass the roller over; failing this make it level with the back of a clean spade. Keep the soil moist by watering, if the weather is dry. See that the little black ants do- not carry away all the seeds; this latter is often the cause of failure, and the seedsmen are blamed for the ants' depredation. If the ants are found carrying away the seeds, have the seeds slightly covered with soil or sand, the layer must be thin, if covered deep the grass will not come through. Keep the rose bed clean and fairly moist at this season, a handful of bone dust, or any good fertil...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Pastoral and Agricultural Shows. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 September 1901

Pastoral and Agricultural Shows. We shall be obliged if Secretaries of Agricul tural Shows~pll advise us of any altera tions in their dates, in order that we may have our list up-to-date in this respect. Cairns A. P. and M. A.-September 5, 6. Ipswich and West Moreton A. and H. Socy. September 27. Ingham-Herbert River P. & A. Association -Sept. 27 and 28. Zillmere Horticultural Society-Sept. 28. Rosewood Farmers' Club--October 4. South Queensland and Border P. and A. Socy., Nerang-October 26.

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
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