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Title: Western Mail Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,028,759 items from Western Mail, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Agricultural Brevities. FROM THE FEDERAL AUSTRALIAN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

Agricultural Brevities. 1 FROM THE FEDERAL AUSTRALIAN. I It is said that shavings sprinkled with diluted carbolic acid will make a hen's nest entirely free from vermin. In one district in France the milk of 250,000 sheep is made into cheese. From 2000 to 3000 tons are produced. A native newspaper says that a recent estimate places the number of persons en- gaged in agriculture in Japan at 15,630,000. Three thousand blooming chrysanthemum plants were exhibited at the show of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society on the 10th November. The reported yield of hay per acre in the United States averages li tons, and indi- cates a crop of over 47,000,000 tons, nearly as large as that of 1884. In France the oxen that work ia the fields are regularly sung lo as an encouragement to exertion, and no peasant has the slightest doubt that the animal listens to him with pleasure. Sows' niilkos the richest and most nutriti- ous of all milks. It contains 50 perceur, more solid constituents, such as ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

A consign meat of whitebait from Tasmania recently arrived in London. It was not frozen like tho mutton, but was kept at a low temperature, and at the end of the voy- age was found quite fresh and wholesome.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Irrigation on the Adelaide Plains. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

I Irrigation ou the Adelaide Plains. It will be a surprise to many to learn that the experiment ot irrigation is being tried upon a inodeiately large scale upon the Adelaide Plains. The account published below of what is being done in this way upon the farm of Air. Thomas Shaw, near Woodville, is not only full of interest, but the recorded results are full of encourage- ment for those who are disposed to go and do likewise. Mr. Shaw has no special . natural advantages at command. There is no running water or permanent lake upon his land ; the water he distributes is raised from a well which apparently has an inex- haustible supply drawn from soakage in the hills. The area irrigated by him is 120 acres, the appliances tor both raising and distributing the water are very simple, and the results in the enrichment ot the soil are soniethiug wonderful. Seven cuttings of lucerne, of about 30 cwt to the acre each will, it is expected, be obtained this year, aud the yield of maize is almos ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CENSUS RETURNS FOR 1884. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

CENSUS RETURNS FOR 1884. . ? ? ?? Being under the impression that the in- crease in the population of the colouy during the past year would be found to have been eminently satisfactory, we re- cently applied to the Registrar General's office for information ou the subject, and were courteously supplied with the fol- lowing figures :-The population on the 31st December, 1884, was 32,958. The births during the course of the year 1885 were : males 623, females 577-total 1200. The deaths during the twelvemont h were : males 406, females 194-total 600. The excess of births over deaths was, conse- quently, 600. Arrivals in the colony during 1885 were : males 2,277. females 770 - total 3,047. Departures were : males 1,128, females 291-total 1,419. The excess of arrivals over departures was, consequently, 1,628. Adding to- gether these two excesses we arrive at the figures 2,228, which represent the total in- crease in the population of the colony brought|about during the past year-that pop...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THE NONPAREIL TREE AND STUMP EXTRACTOR. TO THE EDITOR. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

THE NONPAREIL TREE AND STUMP EXTRACTOR. TO THE EDITOB. Sie,-In travelling through the Fork District I havo beeu very much surprised to find so few settlers are aware of the splendid results to be obtained by tne use of "Ticloar's Nonpareil Tree and Stump Extractor." This labour saving machine should be in general use throughout Hie .agricultural districts of the colony, for the ease with which our largest "York gums are pulled out of the ground by it is simply marvellous. Trees one foot through take abuut 10 minutes, and those measuring 30 inches, about half au hour to thorough- ly uproot, while by the same operation the ground within a radius of 6 foet from the butt of the tree is well broketi up by the | upheaved roots and stump. I Tile machine referred to consists cf a steel plate with a row of holes on e¿ch ' side of it, a lever about 14 feet long, with sufficient chain aud rods to connect the tree to be pulled down, with the tree from which you work. In the first place, a chain...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MR. PARNELL'S SENTIMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

\MR. PARNELL'S SENTIMENTS. o In December last we published a letter from " A Former Continuous Brake In- spector " deprecating the introduction of tue vacuum brake system on our railways and urging the superiority of the West iughouse brake, of which the writer had had eighteen months experience on an English railway line. Tide letter some- what alarmed the timid aud led them to believe that the system our Commissioner, of Railways proposed to introduce was so imperfect as to provide no certain safety in working the steep grades of the Eastern line. We find ground for reas- surance, however, in the fact that some little time ago a meeting of railway loco- motive engineers was held at Euston, at the request of the Chairmen of the lead- ing rail way companies of Englandand that, at this meetiug, a resolution was unanim- ously passed adopting the vacuum brake as superior to every other description. Since the meeting the engineers tlieu assembled have separately given written testimony ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CONTINUOUS BRAKES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

CONTINUOUS BRAKES. -«- - Writing to the Times on the subject of Mr. Laboucbere'B advocacy of Home Rule, for Ireland, a correspondent says :-" For r v years past-ever since, and even before, the establishment of the Parnellite League-I have had good opportunities, by personal contact, of learning what the real objects of its leaders are. Let Mr. Labouchere, however, only ponder upon 1 what Mr. Parnell publicly said in two speeches made before Irish volunteers in America. " O that I could carry these arms for Ireland, (Great applause.) Well, it may come to that some day or other." And, again, " None of us, whether we are in America or in Ireland, or where ever we may be, will be satisfied until we "have destroyed the last link which keeps Ireland bound to England." Now, will Mr. Labouchere say whether he considers Mr. Parnell a mere humbug ? If not, is it not egregious fooling to tell English- men that the best thing to be done is to practically place governmental powers in the hands ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
DEDICATION OF ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH, YORK. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

DEDICATION OF ST. PATRIOTS CHURCH, YOHK. i . .. . «ft_ Next Sunday, st York, will take place the ceremony of the dedication of the new St. Patrick's Church. In order to -, meet the convenieLce of many who are - desirous of being present on the occasion ( a special train has been arranged for, ' which will leave Perth Station for the " Eastern Metropolis at 6 a.m., starting from York on the return journey at 6 p.m. The dedication service will take place at 11 a.m., when the Very Reverend The Vicar General will preach. There will also be an afternoon service at 4-30 p.m., when Father Brereton will address the ,. congregation.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Orchard. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

The Orchard. Dry weather says the Sydney Mail, ap- pears to have little affected newly planted fruit trees, as with everything else vigour of growth see mee incidental to young trees, and as all interested in fruit growing desire to obtain results as quickly as possible, our oft given advice of nipping back shoots should te strictly adhered to. In consider- ing the quesliou of peach apples, which are well known to throw up long shoots while in a young condition, and producing fruit on the topB of such shoots only, the question naturally arises with the orchardist what to do with them ? With such trees the best advice to give is to sacrifice these small quotas of fruit for a few seasons, and bring the tree into a dwarf shate'y mass* after which when these long shoots exhaust them- selves, large crops of apples may be obtained similar to that Iproduoed from other treeB. From now till another month or two there will be vigorous growth in all trees in the orchard, and the very old dootr...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
JANUARY AND FEBRUARY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

JANUARY AND FEBRUARY. The vintage will commence these months in many parts of the colocy. The conditions necessary to make good wine are : (1.) Fine dry weather at the period of the vintage. (2.) The grapes should be perfectly matured, which is known by the following signs : 1st, the stalks of the bunches become brown. 2nd, the bunches become pendent. 3rd, the grape has lost its hardness, and the skin becomes thin and transparent. 4th, the grape separates easily from the stalks. 5th, the juice is savoury, thick, and sticky. The next point to be determined is the peiiod to be allowed for the fermentation. This, of course, must depend upon circum- stances, and the object or kind of wine sought to be produced. Thus:-1st, the juice of the grape ought to be in the vat a Bhorter time in proportion to its being less rich aud saccharine. In Burgundy, the light wine called Yin de Primeur cannot be left iu the vat more than from six to twelve hours. 2nd, the must should ferment a shorter time...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Preservation of Apples. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

Preservation of Apples. A writer in the American Cultivator teÙatf ^ how he has preserved appleB and kept tbiíoT fresh and fair for l8 or HO months. He-" takes the apples ripe anA fresh from tha trees, and covers them up with dry, fine coal ashes, to a depth of 14 to l8 inches. He has apples that have passed two winters thus preserved, out of doors, exposed to rain and frost, and yet the fruit came out fresh and fair. How much longer the oshea would keep under these circumstrnceB he does not know. Possibly pears, eggs, and some other perishable articles, he thinks,, might be kept by this simple and inexpen- sive process much longer than by present method.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
HORICULTURAL NOTES. The Codlin or Apple Moth. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

HOEIODLTURAL NOTES. -? The Codlin or Apple Moth. Our attention has been directed, says a Victorian paper, by a Geelong cor- respondent to what he chooses to de- nominate "bis system" of treating the apple moth. The treatment being, except- ing in one particular, identical with that recommended each season for several years, past in our own columns, would have de- manded no notice but for the exceptional item. The writer pointedly refers to hi«, success in trapping moths by means of a light over a vessel of sweetened liquor. This plan has been tried extensively by other growers, but in the main has not proved successful in trapping the real apple moth, whilst proving fatal to other moths ia fairly large numbers, in referring iu our last to the "apple-moth in South Aus- tralia," a tolerably accurate, but . brief, delineation was given of the methods of combating the insect recommended by experience. It is, of- course, quite possible that the non-success of others m their at. tempt to ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Vine. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

The Vine. Continental experiments on vines treated with a mixture of lime and sulphate of cop» per to cure mildew s'*ow that the leaves of the vine exhibit most traces of copper. Then come the stalks and skin. Nearly all the copper, however, adheres to the surface ; there is little quantity in the wort, and in the vine there is scarcely an indication of it. Tho maximum is 0*1 gr. to 1O00 litres. This is attributed to the fermentation. The metal is precipitated and found in tho dregs.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

IfeHPMm ©UP" Contributions and Notes on Temperance work in the colony and elsewhere will be thankfully received. Address, "Tem- perance," Western Nail office, St. George's Terrace, Perth. Jk. O. G. X. FIDELITY LODGE No. 41. THE Meetings of the above Lodge are held every Thursday Evening at 8 o'clock in the Wesleyan Schoolbook, corner of William and Murray Street, Perth. Initiation fees :-Males 3s, Females 2s. The Object of this Association being the welfare of our fellow men we invite the assis- tance and co-operation of all who have this object at heart. Come and help ns to remove the Drink Curse, Any information can be obtained from Bros L, J. Banfora, L.D, or J. ¿mallwood, W< Sec. BOCK OP SAFETY LODGE, No 22. rHE above Lodge meets in the Rechabite Hall, "Wellington Street Perth, every Monday, at 7-30 p.m. All who are interested in the Temperance Cause, and any who are willing: to join will be heartily welcomed. Initiation Fees-Males 2s 6d, Females Is 6d. A meeting is o...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Ostrich Farming in South Australia. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

Ostrich Farming in South Australia, It may bo remembered that it the last session of Council, the Legislature-agreed to recommend that a concession of land for ostrich farming should be granted to » Mr. Lempriere, of London, and also to Mr. Malcolm, of South Australia. The I most sanguine statements were made at the time about the great success of the in I dustry in the sister colony, and of the large profits to be derived from it. It appears, however, from the JS. A. Chroni- cle, that the result of tho ostrich farming in that colony has thus far not proved a very brilliant success. The history of the matter is shortly this. An Act was passed by the South Australian Legisla- ture, in 1882, providing for leases of land not exceeding 5000 acres in extent for estrich farming, and holding out the special inducement of the grant of the fee simple of the land thus leased to any ostrich farmer who should first breed or place on the land 250 ostriches, "until " they were one year old. The l...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
AUCTION REPORTS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

AUCTION REPORTS. >, 1 Courthope & Co report the sale at/« auction at their Mart on the 5thinst., of a V, portion of Perth Lot H 15, with the two» . '', storied dwelling-house thereon, in tbe - '[ occupation of Mr. Hester, on £900, '. prompt cash. Mr. J. K. Churchyard was . the purchaser. The same firm sold yes- « terday 940 posts and rails for account oE ~~ ' Mr. V.R. Byfield at 44s. per hundred, and 100 sacxs Cape barley on another account at as., bags 8£d.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Origin of Cricket. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

The Origin of Cricket. Without trenching in anyway upon the domain of our contributor " Vindex," the visit of the New Norcia cricketers suggests one or two general remarks in this column upon the "noblegame" itself. The French say that we Britishers take our amusements sadly. To outsiders we may seem to do so ; but it cannot be deni- ed that we take them energetically. To whatever part of the world Englishmen travel they always carry with them, to- gether with their ledgers and their Bibles, their cricket bats abo. Yet the game of cricket seems to have had a rather humble origin. References to the game occur first of all in English literature at the latter part of Queen Elizabeth's reign, when it had apparently become established under the name of " hamlyn and handout." Antiquarians have hitherto baen satisfied to ttace its descent from the old "Club ball," but a rival origin has come into the field. To the New World, it is said, we are indebted for the noblest of our English pastim...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Mysterious Hand. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

The Mysterious Hand. I From New Zealand there comes news of a most impudent attempt to defraud an insurance company. The affair has been exciting intense interest for some weeks past in that colony, the facts being briefly these. In October last a young married man named Abthua Howabd, an engine fitter, whose life was insured for £2400, mysteriously disappeared from, Christchurch. On the morning of tho day in question he spoke of going to bathe at Summer, a little washing-place a few miles from Christchurch, where his clothes were subsequently found on the beach. His family and friends were in- consolable for hie losB,and loudly bewailed the sacrifice of a bright yonng life thus untimely cut off ere yet its prime had been reached. Everybody sympathised with them,-excepting the callous insur- ance office in which the missing man had insured his life. The insurance company refused either to comfort them or to hand over the amount of the policy. Perhaps they could not bring themselves ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
What are we to do for Servants? [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

What are we to do for Servants ? The problem of what is vulgarly called " servant galism " is alluded to else- where, and as certainly a difficult one. The question, also, in some respects, pre- sents á rather curious anomaly. We hear dismal tales of extreme poverty at home. We are told that there are thousands on thousands who only earn just enough to keep body and soul together from one week's end to another, throughout the year. Yet amongst these families, as statistics show, at least half the members are females, and, for them, after a very early age, there is always an unlimited demand as domestic servants. As this demand is apparently never supplied, there must be a hitch somewhere in the organisation of female labour. Unlike Great Britain these colo- nies have always had a defective female population, and the softer sex (as it is jestingly called) is mostly master of the situation. In vain wages double, treble, «r quadruple those ef the Old World are offered. The domestic hel...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A Successful Temperance Movement. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 February 1886

A Successful Temperance Movement. It will be seen by an advertisement ap- j pearing elsewhere that the trustees of the j Northam .Temperance Hall and Bushman's Home are making a publie appeal in order to xaise sufficient funds to enable them te make certain additions to the building- which are .felt to be greatly needed. The institution is, by all acoonnts a most deserving one, and will, doubtless, meet with the support it merits. For the benefit of those who may not have seen the present building, we may state that it is two-storied, contains on the ground floor a large dining room (in which are the billiard and bagatelle tables), sitting room, 4 bed-rooms, kitohen and store room. On the upper floor there are a large meeting room 40ft by 20ft, and an ante-room. All the rooms are well furnished. A respectable house affording plenty of amusement is thus always open to the youths of the distriot, and the general public can always have fair ac- commodation. The assembly roon possesses ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
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