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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 May 1898

10 PORK RIND FOR WIRE CUTS. I will give your readers a cure for wire cuts, says a writer in Breeders' Gazette. A draft colt of mine threw his feet over a wire and Rawed the ankle half way around and dear to the bone, and down the bone to the hoof. He had bled terribly. The snow was a foot deep and the blood had melted it in several places, but it had stopped bleeding when I found him. As cheap as I had bought the colt, I felt that he was dear enough, and my first thought was to shoot him, but I did not have a gun with me. I picked up the foot and looked at it and the joint was plainly seen. I concluded to try an experiment with meat rind. From a side of pork I cut a slice half an inch thick and put it next to the cut on the ankle. I cut the rind wide enough to bind the ankle from hoof to pastern joint. I used a strap with buckle inserted in three places under the skin of the rind, to hold it in place. The horse has been laid up for four weeks and is now able to run and play over the...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 May 1898

THE MARB AND FOAL. The farmer can ill-afford not to work his mares at this busy season of the year, but mares with foals should not be compelled to do very heavy work. Moderate or light work will do them no harm. Work, if with a care ful teamster and of light character, is a ben efit rather than an injury. If mares are worked severely during the winter and early spring, a weak, crooked foal is apt to be the result. After the foal is dropped, the mare should be'considered an invalid for two weeks, at least. It is probably better not to work the mare after foaling at all, but with the farmer this is impracticable, for he needs the use of the mares. But he must not expect the mare can suckle a foal and perform severe labor every day also. To compel her to do this simply stunts the foal and also injures the mare. If the mare is worked only moderately even, she should have very liberal feed. Don't expect she will raise a fine foal and perform labor at the same time on pasture alone. She ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 May 1898

12 fIARKET REVIEW. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is sell ing at in round lots: Trade opened up the first of the week with every appearance of a lively week. Es pecially can this be forecast in the line of berries and some early fruits. With prevail ing clear warm weather for the week there is sure to be great activity in the berry mar ket. Monday morning proved by far the best of the season so far. Receipts were away ahead of any previous morning and trade was better. Good outside orders added much to the early morning business of several of the leading houses. The streets are very bare of the usual line of California green goods and have had that appearance for some tifne. It is believed the demand here is a little greater than the market below can supply without skimping other markets, and so it does not take long to clear the street after the arrival of each steamer. The showing of early vegetables from the surrounding country was not much better than from California....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 May 1898

Minneapolis buyers offered 90 cents this past week in Eastern Washington for No. 1 club wheat for shipment to Duluth. PORTLAND. Wheat—The wheat market is very dull, there being almost no business at all. Hops—Nominal at s@l2£c; 1896 crop, 4@6c. Wool —Valley, 14@15c; Eastern Oregon, B@l2c; mohair, 25c per pound. Sheepskins—Shearlings, 15@20c; short wool, 25@35c; medium-wool, 30@50c; long wool, 60c@|1.10 each. SAN FRANCISCO. Wheat is dull and uninteresting. The market is rather lower for spot. Barley is quiet. Shipping wheat, f1.62£@1.65; choice mill ing, f 1.75@1.80. Wool —Fall: Southern coast lambs, 7@ 8c; San Joaquin lambs, 7@Bc; Northern lambs, ll@l2c. Hops—Old crop, 9@l2c. CHICAGO. Wheat—May, $1.65; July, fl.ll; Sept., 891 c; Dec, 83fc. Cattle—Beef steers, $54@4.85; exporters, |4.70@4.85; stackers and feeders, $4@5; can ners, $3@3.60; cows and heifers, $4@4.75. LIVERPOOL. Wh ea t_Steady; No. 1 California, 535. Wool.—The Boston Commercial says: Un der the demand encouraged by gove...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 May 1898

14 COLVILLE ON THE FOREST RESERVES. Frederick V. Colville, who spent part of last summer inspecting the forest reserves, sums up his conclusions as to >vhat action should be taken by the interior department to inaugurate a satisfactory system for the regulation of sheep-grazing in the Cascade reserve, in the abstract given below. The steps necessary to a solution of the present difficulties by the interior depart ment are as follows, and these steps, in order to save and perpetuate the timber supply and water supply of middle Oregon, should be taken at once: 1. Exclude sheep from specified areas about Mount Hood and Crater lake. 2. Limit the sheep to be grazed in the re serve to a specified number, based on the number customarily grazing there. 3. Issue five-year permits allowing an owner to graze sheep on a specified tract, limiting the number of sheep to be grazed on that tract, and giving the owner the exclu sive grazing right. 4. Require as a condition of eacli permit that th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 May 1898

FARM FOR SALE. William McCarty farm, fourteen miles south of North Yaklma, 155 acres, for sale for $3,500. Terms, $500 cash, balance on six years' time with annual payments of $500. Interest, 8 per cent on deferred payments. Also farms In the Palouse country. For particulars write to SPARK BROTHERS. Apl 4t Tekoa, Wash. FINE STOCK FOR SALE. One Imported Clydesdale stallion, one 3-4th's blood Clyde Stailton, one 3-year-old and one 2 year-old Short-horn bull. Also a few Berkshire • nigs at bed-rock prices. WM. A. CONANT, Elletuburg, Wash. Aggers & Parker Produce and Commission. Cash paid for POULTRY and EGGS, also all Produce shipped to our Alaska Branch. All consignments receive prompt attention. > ;; --„- -911 Western Avenue • • Seattle, Wash. Your boxes will never burst If put together with Cement coated Wire nails For which the Seattle Hardware Com pany has the State Agency. If your deal er doesn't keep them write to them for prices. . >•• .. ■ B KEEPERS! SEND FOR sample ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 May 1898

16 Two Great Machines. ;■•:- CLARK'S RIGHT LAP PLOW CALIFORNIA CUTAWAY and Seeder Combined. Orchard Plow . - -■ - * ■ ■ THIS IS THE WONDERFUL RIGHT LAP. 1^ Read • What others say about it: Plows close to the tree without driving horses in branches. Arlington, Oregon. down and turns the ground over equal to r*^^. J 4-tmZ^ „ *i Roseburg. Oregon, Feb. 2, 1898. Shurte Bros: In regard to the "Right Lap" any plow that I ever used. I can do twice ' l^eaQ til IS Se'nlS^cTtaway'orchaTd Plow! h^Tried I bought of you last spring would say that the work with it that I can with a plow It in my orchard and find that it is exact- It has exceeded my expectations in the way and find' that the ground I put in with it ■ ly what I want and decidedly the best If does the work" It" not only plows the equaled at least one-third more than that ' beS^in^/or^ to *?§? a^l X ground, but leaves it in better shape for put in in the ordinary method. Money I f £f* the work that this machine does. Have a rroD that ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

fMncH And Range sny^. -M ISSUED every week 'ikr V _v__ . . '■ ... . -. IT Vol 4, No. 10. 4 Largest Assortment in the Pacific Northwest of t j AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS I "3 \ Embracing the Most Popular Approved Lines. g- I EVERYTHING THAT A FARNER NEEDS. I 1 What do You Think of This: _ "5 "Baby" De Laval Hand Separators, Capacities Increased _SIF IKj IfllpfOVC YOUF DairiCS. X* Designs Improved. Make them Cheaper ■ Km. lET>i_ _l *^J W«VB^^^_ I«P |^ FAItM BUTTER UNSALABLE.—That this is a positive J* .. . Than Before .. . HI wl »jBFii^B9M&-^ flu liM t"° well known. Storekeepers nil over the country are Bpl* ,^9 ■■ i^C ■B^^hl^^B^'^BW now actually obliged to turn down FARM BUTTER, because B^ •^ Baby No. S.-Guaranteed 675 pounds per hour Mi^jßß\R JESfcl 8~l th iS "° murket for U- " (loes not > as a rule come l"' t0 the ■"■I ■ ■ VV^.^H^BBB V* standard of the public taste, and ere long it will be impossible to fcj^, •^ Baby No. 2—Guaranteed 350 pounds per hour. " sell anything but ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

2 pvO you contemplate the purchase of a new threshing rig this year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on this coast? If so write us for catalogue. Mailed free on application. 111 111 I TTI t-, threshers Ml^ IM 4^ 111 £ oV *»- ■ Ir^l ■* 11 r4 §^ Tanks, W^ F^^^^^^l^^fe^^^^^^^Sr^ stackers, Saw Mills, HORSE powers. . THE "RUSSELL" COMPOUND TRACTION ENGINE TAKES THE LEAD. It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner, write us for particulars. Russell & Co., Portland, Oregon. . 320-324 Belmont Street, 160-166 East First Street. Purebred Jersey Cattle and Berkshire Swine .... M. HORAN, • • ■ Wenttchee, Wash. W. M. Darlington W. L. Darlington. W. H. Darlington Darlington Livestock Commission Co. Ship your Cattle, Sheep and Hogs to us. Fair treatment, top prices and quick returns Chicago, - . - - - Illinois. Elm wood Herd of A. J. C. C. Jerseys McComblnatlon 39961, a grandson of Brown Bessie 74997, champion cow of the Co...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

RANCH AND RANGE- Vol 4, No. 10. DON'T READ THIS Or you may think that we and our ancestors have beeen doing wrong for many years in killing horses, profits and happiness because we have not used wheels with wide tires. It would pay us to put our shoulder to the pro verbial wheel and help along; so let us all join hands and have all wheels with wide tires. There are two ways that these wide tires are beneficial. 1. If you haul a load of one ton over a muddy road with a one and a half inch tire, it is most likely to cut to the bottom, but if the tire is five or six inches, unless the road is in a slushy condition, it will not be apt to sink more than one to two inches; thus not allowing the mud to fall onto the felloe. There will also be considerable friction and both of these take an immense power, as the mud on the wheel has a considerable pur chase. This is true in sand as well as mud. 2. The wide tire acts as a roller, while the narrow one is a great destroyer of roads. Thus the c...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

4 tightly many rootlets or suckers are pro duced, which grow into the tissues of the host plant and draw therefrom the elaborated sap in much the same manner as rootlets of common green-leaved plants draw crude nu triment from the soil. The host plant, robbed of a portion of its richest sap, becomes dwarfed, and many plants, especially clovers, are actually killed. The dodder plant, how ever, continues to grow. The lower part of the dodder stem dies and withers as soon as the nutriment in the seed is exhausted, or as soon as the shoot is made fast to a host plant. Method of Spread In Field. As soon as the upper part becomes well established on a living host plant, branches are produced, waving slowly about, like the first shoot, until they reach some green plant upon which they can grow. By the time the host plant first attacked dies, these branches are firmly established on several new hosts. Thus the dodder lives on, dying behind as its support is destroyed, and pushing out branch...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

j'he poultry Yard. S. M. SHIPLEY, : : : : : : Editor. FEEDING FOR BEST RESULTS. Not only is a certain amount of food neces sary to sustain animal life, but certain par ticular food elements are absolutely essen tial for building up and replenishing the va rious parts of the body. These demands are the first to be satisfied out of the food con sumed, then any surplus remaining is either stored up, in the shape of fat, for the future use of the animal organism, or ts utilized in the reproduction of other animal life or bodies, which reproduction in the case of mis tivss hen means more eggs. We thus see that the so-called poultry products of the f arm — -the eggs and marketable chickens are simply the results of the surplus food consumed by our flocks. It therefore follows that the greater the amount of food con sumed and assimilated, just that much great er will be this surplus and the resultant prod m ggs e .t_ and flesh—provided, always, that the right materials are supplied for the...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

6 SHEEP POISONED BY LARKSPUR. We publish this article to enable sheep men to recognize the poisonous larkspur, to guard against it and to know how to treat sheep after they have been poisoned. Dr. E. V. Wilcox, of the Montana experiment sta tion, has written a valuable paper on the above subject from which this article is taken: Description of the Flnnt. Larkspur, of which there are two species, belongs to; the Crowfoot family, which in cludes such well-known plants as clematis, buttercup, anemone, columbine and aconite. Most of the plants of this family have an ac rid juice and at least the larkspur and aconite possess; poisonous principles or alkaloids. Delphinium Menziesii is the smaller of the two species. It ordinarily attains a height of from six to eighteen inches. The plant is smooth at its base, but is usually hairy above and upon the flowers. The leaves are five parted in a palmate manner, and the parts are again cleft two or three times. The ulti mate divisions of the lea...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

hints were therefore necessary. Where the sheep had eaten but a small quantity of the larkspur, and were noticed soon afterwards, the administration of am monia or alcohol was found to give good re sults. One-half cupful of alcohol in water or ond tablespoonful of ammonia in a cup of water was given as a dose. The lletit Remedy. The most effective remedy tried was a hy podermic or injection under the skin of atro pine sulphate. A solution was prepared in camphor water in the proportion of four grain! of atropine to one fluid ounce of cam phor water. Several sheep were treated by this method, and all but one so treated re covered. Doses of different sizes were ad ministered: 1-3, 1-4 and 1-6 of a grain of at ropine sulphate. This was in solution in camphor water as just described, so that in order to give the atropine in the quantities mentioned it was necessary to use 40, 30 and 20 minims (or single drops) respectively of the solution. Atropine as a direct stimulant of the heart's a...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

8 Ranch and Range IBBUKD KVERY SATURDAY. In the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. published by thk RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. Conducted by - MTLLER FREEMAN Assistant Editor - H. M. WALLACE, B. A. Editorial Offices, .... Seattle, Wash. business offices: Seattle, - - - 315-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, • • Suite F Hypotheek bank building. BUHBORIPTION, IN ADVANCE, - $1.00 PER YKAR. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. If we were to ask the question, what is the most profitable industry for the northwestern farmer at the present time, the answer we would receive from most people would be, "Wheat growing." We do not deny that this is true. All indications point, as we have previously stated in these columns, to a good price for wheat and a bountiful crop. Ranch and Range wishes to call attention to another fact. During the past eight or ten months ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

kind of hay he makes is not of much account, anyhow. He may think it is, but only be cause he does not know any better, and it is not a matter of very great importance whether he puts it in a. shed or stacks it. It is otherwise, however, with the farmer who proposed to have h«y that has feed in it, that slicks to the ribs, builds up good rich blood, that has a great potency for muscle-making, or milk or fat production. That man ought to have a hay shed. We do not say barn, be cause a good many of our readers are unable to build another barn this summer, but a shed. He can build a shed cheaply if he but think so. It may cost him fifty dollars or five hundred, depending upon the size and the plan, but he cannot afford to do without it. Hay under the very best conditions will lose from 12 to 15 per cent, in feeding value when stacked. Tinder ordinary conditions it will lose 25 per cent, while hay put in a shed in proper condition will scarcely lose 5 per cent. The difference between 5 ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

10 HANDY WATERINQ DEVICES. The principle of the vacuum has been used to good advantage in devising simple and handy drinking fountains for all kinds of farm' animals, from poultry to cattle. The bottle device is suitable for small chicks, while a barrel used in place of the bottle will serve for sheep, hogs or cattle. In the former case the bottle is first filled with water and then deftly inverted over a pan also contain ing water. The vacuum in the bottle pre vents the escape of more water into the pan except the air is admitted from below. For a stock trough build a strong water-tight box of any desired dimensions and about a foot deep.' In the middle of this trough place a tight box, barrel or hogshead to hold the wa ter. Fill this receptacle with water through a hole in the top. Also fill the trough to the desired height and then, after stopping the top hole perfectly tight, bore a hole in the barrel at the level of the surface of the water It positively cures and prevents Chic...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

BACTERIA IN MILK. A few years ago bacteria, to the common mind, meant infinitesimal life germs which were the agents of every sort of evil to hu man beings. This dread of bacteria was the result of little knowledge on the subject, the first dread that always comes when we learn of the presence of something which may bring us evil, but which we cannot exactly locate. A great advance has been made from the crude notions of that time and we have now come to regard bacteria as just as essential to health in one case us they are bearers of ills in another. In no other branch of farm work have bacteria to do so much, nor power to do so much for good or evil as ill the dairy. We now know that milk sours because of the presence of bacteria, that cream ripens because of their action, and that butter is good or bad principally accord ing to the kind of bacteria in the cream. So far has research gone in this direction that a common article in dairy supply stores now is bottles of bacteria cult...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

12 HARKET REVIEW. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is soil ing at in round lots: The genera] produce is steady. Trade is moving along quite satisfactorily. New potatoes are coming in quite briskly, but all from California y^t. During the past month or two some potatoes have been shipped east and have helped the situation somewhat here. Now new potatoes are arriv ing in those states from the south and are be ginning to shut out our shipments. Probably a comparatively small amount will be shipped cast from now on. There are more old pota -loes here on the coast than Seattle can con sume. If the railroads should make a lower rate more of them would go east. Potatoes—Native, |7@11; Burbanks, $9 @11; rose, #7@B. New potatoes are 2@2^c. Celery, 35@40c per doz; lettuce, 35c; rad ishes, 10c; new onions, $1(771.10 per hundred; cabbage, lfc per lb for California; parsnips, per sack, 75(7/00c; cauliflower, $1 per doz; rhubarb. He; Walla Walla asparagus, $1.25 (ft 1.50 per 15-lb box; h...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 June 1898

WASHINGTON WEATHER REPORT. Seattle, Wash., May 31, 1808. The week ending Monday, May 30, 1898, may be regarded as one entirely favorable to crops, and the hopes of I lie tanners have been greatly raised. At the beginning of the week there were one or two light frosts, but they did no serious damage. The following days were warmer, and the temperature rose steadily, culminating in a hot day, the 25th. Thunder showers followed on the 2<>th, and light, steady rains the following days, in the eastern section, and occasional showers in the western section. In the western section the moisture was not urgently needed, except by the straw berry crop, and the greatest benefit was to it. In fact, all crops were benefited, and all are looking exceedingly flourishing. Throughout the eastern section, according to all reports, the rainfall was heavy, amounting to an inch or an inch and a half in thirty-six hours, thoroughly soaking the soil to a depth of ten inches or more, and re viving th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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