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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1905

Livestock Wo k of the State Veterinarian. *!,, !>iennial report of State Veteri rta S. B. Nelson was issued recent "ar shows the condition of the live- JJrfj n the state to be most excellent Jnm health standpoint. Dr. Nelson ay S iat at no time since the office fst c veterinarian was established ?v tl legislature have the stock in ures been in such a highly satis facto and excellent condition as hey '.re at this present time. fh state is entirely free from hog ho lr i and swine plague. Glanders ■ n i) ses has decreased nearly one ha lf dthough nearly twice as many bor g'i have been examined as in any nrevi us period. Th number of animals examined - ere <»,291 horses, 1,098 cattle, 4,724 sheo ,,. and 437 hogs, a total of 12,550, an d ■ ere the property of 121 owners. T\\. nty-four horses were destroyed as biing affected with glanders of w hicli number four were traced di rectly to importation from one of the Eastern states and three were brought from a neighboring state for the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1905

1.1 the days of cheap land and cheap grass. There is a special opportunity for the improvement of the milking breeds !n those earlier days the creamery was not established. Nearly every man who engaged in it lost money. There was no known measure of the value of milk. Everything was guesswork. That is all changed now. You can de termine the value of the products of the cow quite as accurately as you can the value of the products of an acre of grain. It is, therefore, a good time to establish a herd of dual pur pose cattle of any of the milking breeds. Look carefully over the advertise marts of ihe public sales that are to come off this winter and next spring Make a study of the milking form, for the milking form is similar in all breeds. Select some one breed and then buy good milkers of that breed using your best judgment. Study how to feed and to feed for balanced ration. Tf this policy were followed out we should have a class of steers growing on farms where men natronize cream e...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1905

ri for it. It is really cheaper than Jh, >ther, on account of so much of 1,, cheap kind disappearing in the f« r of liquid lard. Probably the men 1 feed hogs do not realize the differ ", in the results that are obtainable h» ifferent methods of feeding. It JL s certain that if we are to in %, c the price of the hog there must J )( , general increase in quality. The „ c is demanding both a lard hog !,,, a bacon hog. and there is no re: m why they should not both be fui ished. Concerning the Brood Sow. i feeding and care of the brood gO , is one of the most important oper a ,i is connected with the swine in ,l,, iy. In many sections the first pit r is made in permitting the young gil to remain in the fattening pens un tii the salable hogs are ready for market. This is sure to be more or Ips injurious to the digestive system, W !i h. in a. breeder, should not be ;l i, ,(i by the feeding of the wrong foods. Furthermore, gilts that are fat tened so rapidly have deposited about ili, -v...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1905

16 Tubular-osis r •*•*#»> IS PREVALENT ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. It seems to be restricted to -■■ ggg* farming communities, and readily attacks any man who habitually milks cows. i J£_f__j§f_ft''* - M <-: ■BBftSßJyf' This new fever, for it takes the form of a fever, was never heard of until the last 1 couple of years, but since its first appearance, its progress has been so rapid that it \^^^^^R|^^^^^^^^^jffmW has now spread all over the country. However, no alarm need be felt for it is *^^^ fMMB. ' easily remedied and we can prescribe for you a ready and sure antidote. We have l^ajafeMil had the pleasure of prescribing for 500 cases this year and a permanent cure was "^Wfl^CSHllHß^^^aß^"'-' established in each instance. We furnished each applicant with a brand-new Sharp- 3*4fljJ* H les Tubular Cream Separator. This is the only remedy. Others have endeavored V^PPSB^' * A Bii jt to allay it, by recommencing their blue separators, but a sickening feeling frequent '/ . i*~^-*^flfi_y(...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

. .vj*f^^^^^^^g-=ri^^^^^^*^^^^gEsSErz^sMßW^^^^^^r~::~— -^^ —-mßßßßE^^^^^^^^ j^^^^^^^Bß^R^ 4WSBB^IWIWifc* -—^^WBB^^^ _<jBRMRk_- "mwßS^wS^SSigl'" . VOI, XXII. NO. 3. THE DAIRYMAN FARMER j& JEt££r£££ Any person whose work it is to cul tivate the ground is called a farmer. There are many departments of farm work, but the farmer in whom we are herein more particularly interested is the one whose efforts are confined to that department of soil cultivation known as dairy farming. Every farm er is not a dairyman and by far too tew dairymen are in truth farmers. At the present day and age of the world the secret of success appears to lie in the person being well grounded in the fundamental princi ples underlying the specialty in hand —such is more and more becoming me case in the work of dairy farming. A farm stocked with dairy cows does not of itself constitute a dairy farm— in defining a dairy farm Webster makes no mention of cows, but defines the same as "a farm chiefly devoted to ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

2 tests, conclusively demonstrated their superior value as milk producers. It is simply a business proposition then, that the farmer should grow such plants rather than to waste time and energy upon less valuable plants for such purpose. It is generally con ceded that the legumes, such as the clovers, vetches, pears and the like, head the list of such plants. A knowl edge as to the life history, habits of growth, and the best methods for se curing the same becomes all import ant. Whether our acres average one and one half tons or five tons of hay, or five or fifteen to twenty tons of forage, is of very great importance, when considered in its relation to the cost of production of our dairy prod ucts. As a rule, a poor harvest can be attributed to poor farming. Once the crop is produced a loss of from 40 to 75 per cent, often occurs in its feeding value, through improper meth ods in securing the same or bad man agement, or both, which is another important factor in the matter of chea...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

THE RANCH Office: 330 Colman Building: Mil.l IK FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors „ U -AL,UEN, H. L. BLANCHARD *' MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month Subscription, in advance, one year 60 '.«■ six months, 30 cents. If on time, »,ib-riipti°ns will be $1. Seattle subscrib es are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commissions and sal aries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until . n order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in wrUing. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer as we cannot find it n our list from the name alone on the a p or We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expira tion is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regu...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALOEN One of the new apples that is bound to come to the front is the Arkansas Black. Here in Seattle it can be found on many of the fruit stands in mid-winter. I know of no apple that will surpass it in fine appearance. When gently rubbed with a woolen cloth it glistens like highly polished mahogany. I know of no apple that will surpass it in brilliancy of color and have doubts if any will equal it. The tree is a strong upright grower. It rarely ever splits and its limbs, however loaded with fruit, never break. The quality of the fruit is ex cellent. We have been using this ap ple in our family this winter and our women folks think it one of the best cooking apples we raise. It is a su perior eating apple. The color of the apple is so intense that it penetrates the meat or flesh of the apple to some extent, thus adding a tinge of red to the cooked fruit. It is a good keeper. I have kept the Arkansas Black till May and found it crisp and juicy then. Some fruit gro...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

o wn use and have several boxes of them now in my cellar in Seattle, but they don't taste like they did in In diana when I was a barefooted boy an ,l would climb to the very top of ' t ) U . old Milan tree that I might get the best apple to be had. How I wish it were possible to live over one day o f that boyhood period of my life v, ith father and mother and brothers and sisters there and could eat the Indiana Milans again! • • * The only way to settle such a ques tion as this is to eat the eastern and western apples at the same time. Memory must be ruled out for the time being. This test was often made the past fall in St. Louis. There were the eastern and western apples side by side and the test was frequently made. The following, clipping from the Oregon Agriculturist and Rural Northwest, is a fine presentation of this matter and shows how good men and true may be mistaken: "At the opening session C. W. Galloway, who was superintendent of the horticul tural exhibit at the St. Lo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

0 THE DAIRY State Dairymen's Convention. The twelfth annual meeting of the Washington Dairymen's association was held this year at Olympia on Jan uary 19, 20 and 21, with President Reed in the chair. The attendance was large and the program as printed in The Ranch of January 1 carried out, with many interesting features interspersed. One of the important pieces of work was the preparation and approval of a draft of a bill to be introduced in the state legislature. This is an amendment to the present dairy law of the state, and confers greater pow ers upon the dairy and pure food com missioner, embodying the ideas ex- pressed by Commissioner McDonald in his report and printed in The Ranch. The dairy commissioner and his deputies virtually become state dairy inspectors under the proposed law, and have power to condemn un sanitary dairy premises, to test the milk and cream at any creamery where there is reason to believe an honest test is not being made, and to see that no creamery or ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

!ue sunbonnets, and each one carried " milk-pail. The town was decorated a. il l 1 yellow, and each creamery had T badges out, stating the amount of money it had paid its patrons during V past year. On arrival at the makers' stand, in the grove in front f the school house, the children went through a little exercise illustrating j a jr/scenes, such as milking the cow, and "going out to the field in the morn ing- II was a remai"kable case of a quirk change from one style of garden in <r ,o another. A Home-Made Starter. The Jersey Bulletin gives the follow ing recipe for making a home-made staitor. It is worth preserving for future reference: "You can make it from skim-milk. That from a fresh C ow gives the best flavor. Place the skim-milk in a closed earthenware or glass vessel, or clean tinware will do, and keep it at a temperature of from SO to 90 degrees until it is lop pered, or has a slightly acid taste. If the quantity thus prepared is not enough, get some clean skim-milk an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

8 duction of each cow in his herd and whether she is a source of profit or loss. For the time and expense required, there is nothing that will bring the farmer better returns than the rais ing of chickens and the producing of eggs. But to be a success the in dustry must be given the most care ful attention all the year round. In fitting the hen for winter work bone and muscle are essential, but not more so than feathers. A good coat of feathers for the laying hen during the winter to keep her warm is essential to egg production. The problem of getting the milking done on the farm would lose much of its importance if it could be done by means of a machine instead of by hand labor, thus rendering the work of milking easier and reducing the necessary hired help on the dairy farms. Ever since dairying became a separate industry the subject of milking machines has been prominent ly before inventors of an agricultural turn of mind, and many a time and oft' it has been confidently hoped th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

HOUSEHOLD MBS. S. C. BUTCHER i ointnunicntlons for this department may Sf . n t to Mrs. S. O. Butcher, Ellensburg, or direct to The Ranch. All ques will be carefully answered; contribu tor publication are welcome. Housekeeping. To be a first-class housekeeper re quires a great amount of knowledge, backed up by good executive ability. Hisiness and art go hand in hand to make housekeeping a success, and not a little of each are required. One must have a knowledge of food, sani tation, house decoration, and econom ics, should be able to plan and con si riict articles of convenience for the Ikune, etc. But this is not all. A housekeeper may always have her house in perfect order; the most crit ical eye may not be able to detect a spot of dirt or speck of dust any where; the table may be well supplied with all the necessary articles care fully selected in regards to the re quirements of each member of the family; all the curtains and draperies may display the touch of an artistic hand, y...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

10 POULTRY ——— H. L. BLANCIIAItD Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Squab Raising and Feeding. (By E. L. Reber.) In raising squabs for profit the per son who goes into the business must not think for a minute that there is no work connected with it. Just like the poutry business, it requires some attention and those who make the greatest success are those who study their birds and try to improve their flock. The subject of feed is of course a very important one. Wheat and cracked corn are the standard feeds, with Canada peas, millet, hemp, rice and kaffir corn as delicacies. Some breeders stick to wheat and cracked corn alone but the experience of the most successful breeders of this coun try has been that better results are obtained if the food is more varied. Particularly is this true of your breed ers. Birds that are raisi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

proper Size for Different Flocks. r o hn W. Tressider, of San Francis ' C»], writing to the author of Blan fihkrd's Poultry Book, says: "Have • ,'st finished your little book and en l it very much; and while some JhinKi are not clear, I am taking ad nnAge of your offer on page 22, and ani writing my questions on another paf^On page 13, par. 2, in reference lo ihe size of breeding pen, etc., you ".. "A small yard from 50 to 200 feet square. Now, that's not very definite, and here is the question that i desire to know: 1 want to keep 85 White Leghorns in one pen, and how lar^e or what size house and yards are necessary? Answer—For the house there should be 5 square feet of floor soa-e for each fowl. The yards, when possible, should be long and narrow. This gives grass a chance to grow in that part of the yard farthest from the building. For 85 hens the same ought not to be less than 40 feet by 150 feet. I do not approve of so many fowls running together when confined in yards. It will...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

12 THE, FIELD Favors the Irrigation Code. In regard to the irrigation code prepared by the Mcßride commission, I hope the present legislature will adopt it. Of course, before this is done any alarming defects should be eliminated. In the study I have given the code, I find one item of great im portance too ambiguous: Sec. 61, par agraph 1 and 3, pages 37 and 38, viz: "taking into consideration the value and character of the service perform ed." This phrase should either be cut out or limited in its application to the "carrier." The charges evidently should not be based upon the profits arising from the use of the water. All of the criticism of the proposed code that I have seen comes from men bitterly opposed to the party who appointed the commission. I am in favor of the code: First, because all of the conflicting interests on the subject were ably represented on the com mission; second, because the code em bodies the best laws of all the arid states, and the suggestions of the bes...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

Alfalfa Culture Without Irrigation. (By Byron Hunter.) Aitliougnt alfalfa gives its largest f; ]ITS under irrigation, often yield x and seven tons per acre in '"", ason, it has been quite thor °n!l,iv demonstrated that it is the JJLgt yielding and best paying hay 5Xt that can be grown on dry up ind ;" eastern Washington and east .. Oregon. On such land it does not c' (,',' its highest development until JJoul the third year, as it requires om , time for the root system to de- Lop sufficiently to take up the re an , v \ I moisture for the plant. There fore little must be expected the first year and only light returns the second. Preparation of the Soil. — The ground selected should be as free as possible from weeds, as these are the greai enemy of the young alfalfa plan*. Land plowed deep in the spring and Hioroughly cultivated during the summer makes an excellent seed bed tor alfalfa. With land prepared in this way and early fall rains, early fall seeding would probably give very sat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

14 LIVE STOCK Cattle Prospects and Retrospects. Chicago is the livestock center of the world and what is being done there may be taken as a good basis upon which to form some idea of the business throughout the country. Last year was a bad one at the Chicago market, owing to the prolonged strike at the packing center. The receipts at the Union Stock Yards for the year show a decrease of 173,301 cattle, 4,244 calves, 87,177 hogs and 78.130 sheep in comparison with the receipts for the previous year. This, however, is only 5 per cent under the receipts for 1903, but is a gain of 4 per cent over 1902. This decrease was due entirely to the strike. At the same time the demand for meats fell off very materially, resulting in the turn ing back on the ranges of a portion of the year's crop of cattle that would otherwise have been sent to market. Naturally prices declined, especially on common grades and half-fat stock, and spoiled what might otherwise have been a prosperous year for the ran...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

n ,l plenty of exercise should be pro a ,|,, t i The food should be nitrogen ous in character, such as will furnish material for growth and build up a JJrong, robust body. The muscles. hones, and tendons, which form the foundation of the body, are rich in dtrogen, an element secured from nrotein. Foods rich in protein are L s t suited to pregnant and growing animali, and among such foods are Dyan, wheat, oats, shorts, rye, barley, peas,' skimmilK, alfalfa, etc. V ration selected from the above foods for the brood sow will give good results, provided the proper care is exercised in feeding. It should be regular and such quantities given as w jjj ] iee p the animal in a robust, grow ing condition, but extremes of thrift must be avoided. Bran, oats and bar ley are more or less coarse and bulky, and should not be fed singly or in too great proportions, but they may be ad vantageously fed along with shorts, wheat, rye and skimmilk. If wheat and rye are to be fed unground it should be soa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1905

16 Tubular-osls fmi&n Mbv^ vl H H fl^im*** ■ y^SS^^P^l3^^^ IS PREVALENT ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. It seems to be restricted to , . , •i^QSaßßjf^sfc'^''- -s'^v-V> ' "*»■ farming communities, and readily attacks any man who habitually milks cows. |: -.1 JgjfcZJ|L y'j-l~'^&£&£k* This new fever, for it takes the form of a fever, was never'heard of until the last '"*^*rHj3B^V " " §tf3;H 1 couple of years, but since its first appearance, its progress has been so rapid that it ■'<ilS*iiß!iß«^ 't^'^i^iW&Wsks \ has now spread all over the country. However, no alarm need be felt for it is -:^^^^»By^i^i^^w- J easily remedied and we can prescribe for you a ready and sure antidote. We have .r^^^^i^ had the pleasure of prescribing for 500 cases this year and a permanent cure was '• :s^^^^M^i|Bsw^^^^ji^^l established in each instance. We furnished each applicant with a brand-new Sharp- IP^IJKI ;'l^^wHß«^^^^'fe*^' * es tubular Cream Separator. This is the only remedy. Others have ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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