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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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REPLIES TO "INFORMATION WANTED." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

REPLIES TO "INFORMATION WANTED." A subscriber states in reply to " Information Wanted," in our issue of March 4th, that if our Now Haven querist ■would obtain from Prof. Brewer the species of grass called " Kangaroo," a better judgment could be formed of its iitness or unfitness as a forage or pasture plant for California; he further states he has not heard of any trial having been made of it in this State. On other points he remarks that lucerne has not been grown on a business scale, but alfalfa has, and has generally given satisfaction: but a good or high farmer could find superior substitutes bj adopting the Belgian proverb which he quotes. Italian rye grass has only been sown sparsely. Its qualities aro overrated, both in Europe and America; its best points consist in affording early spring feed, especially under irrigation; but for feeding, and especially fattening, it is nut of much account. We may here remark, that, according to the experiments of Sinclair, under the superin...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

TO CORRESPONDENTS. "Our Sugar Supply," by " W. W.," will appear next -week; also "Farm House Chats," No. 51, and " Short Papers on Agriculture," No. G. "Nell Van" sends us another excellent story for the Home Circle, and a short story for the little folks. " J. W." —Descriptions of lands in your district are of no value io our renders, unless accompanied by the market value of the same. It is also important to know at what price emigrants can buy land of the best quality. "NYhut do they get besides naked lands? Speak of the houses and fences, the wood and water, the orchards, vineyards, etc. This is a dear country to prospect in; and emigrants can't afford to go and examine unless such details are first presented. Expebimbnt with E<;<is. A correspondent sends US the result of his experience in raising chickens from eggs reported to be of imported blooded fowls. His experience shows that he was " badly sold" in his egg purchase. Better deal with people of establ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Insects Injurious to Vegetation. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Insects Injurious to Vegetation. Quite a handful of dark, plump cutworms or grubs, as they are called by some, were exhibited to us yesterday, having been taken out of a young cabbage patch, where they had done much mischief, having in the night eaten the young plants off near the surf ace of tho ground. They troubled tomatoes also and other vegetatables. There is likewise a small wire worm, sometimes white and sometimes yellow, tliat is found in beans nnd corn soon after being planted, perforating the kernel through and through. Will the Rubal Press at San Francisco, or some other paper, give gardeners some remedy against these nuisances. We take the above from the Srcmmento Union of March 23d, and as this is the time of year when insects of various kinds do great damage in the gardens, orchards and fields we will devote a little space to those most injurious. The Cut-Worm. This is the American name of one of the most destructive insects in the country. It is sometime! called the c...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Ware's Traction Engine. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Ware's Traction Engine. The object of the builder of the engine, represented in our engraving, has been to produce a self-propelling steam carriage for running on common i*oads, or on ice, and an engine which can be adapted to the work of the farm, to driving thrashing or other machinery, pumping, watering gardens, and other purposes. One form of the machine is shown in the accompanying engraving, and presents a very neat appearance. The boiler is held between two forks of a steel frame, which meet on the forward axle and diverge toAvards the rear. The engines work on an incline, and drive a shaft which actuates the rear wheels by means of a chain. The engine is intended to give three revolutions of the first shaft to one revolution of the driving wheels. The difference can be multiplied to nine times. A lever in front of the driver's seat serves to guide the machine when used as a carriage, and a rod with handle connected to the engine shaft readily reverses the motion of the engin...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Herbage and Forage Plants. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Herbage and Forage Plants. It must have been observed by those who read the article published under the above head last week, that the earlier cultivators sought with much avidity for herbage and forage "grasses," as they termed them, among the leguminous and similar plants, eschewing with seeming care the true gi'asses. The reason for this practice, as given in the work from which we are enabled to collate these interesting facts, was that the true grasses " produced many small, hair-like roots which filled the soil, and therefore, could not but be impoverishing and hurtful thereto." The necessity of a rotation of cro2>s was unknown in those days, and the only method of recuperating an overcropped field was to let it remain a few years —a practice and result which of itself was a contradiction to their false theory. The only mode of collecting grass seeds, up to about 1760, was by shaking them out of the hay made from natural grasses; without considering that as the diff...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LOVE IS MIGHTIER THAN FEAR. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

LOVE IS MIGHTIER THAN FEAR. NELL VAN [Written for the Press.] It was breakfast time in the homo of the Mortons. The second bell had been rung, and the maid had just brought in the smoking steak and fried potatoes, when Robert, the eldest son, entered the room with cautious step and downcast look. Mr. Morton stood with his back to the tire, apparently waiting for something or somebody, for his wife and daughters were already there, taking their seats at the table. As the boy slowly , walked across the room to his accustomed place, the father spoke his name in a stern voice, and enquired where he was at supper-time of the preceding day, and at what time he came home. Robert, accustomed to harshness from his father, was prepared for a scene, and immediately began by stating that he had passed the night with Nod Austin. with whom he had gone to skate after school. Ned coaxed him to go home with him, afterwards, that they might study their lessons together, and it being late when they fi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A CHAPTER FOR THE MONTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

A CHAPTER FOR THE MONTH. April. [Written for the I'iirss by Mr. UcD.] A true child of sensibility art thou, gentle and pleasant Aprill Thy soft, pearly tears are so soon charmed away by a gleam of blessed sunshine, that we know not whether to call thee a weeping, or a smiling deity. Refreshing showers are thy benison; and thou oomesi so like the presence of a kind, familiar friend, that the heart is even open to bid thee welcome, [ris hath lent thee her robes of shadowy Light; and her crescent is bending above thy gentle forehead. Not with their gladdest solids do the thrash and robin greet thee; for thy own spirit is infused into the soul of Nature, and every chord of her thousand stringed lyre vibrates with a tone of thrillingsweetliess, as if the bosom of Joy, herself, were'touched with the gentlest thought of sorrow. Is not thy presence clothed with a mission to the human heart, touching its selfishness as with a dissolving wand, until the fountains of benevolence gush within; a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Use of Putrid Food. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

The Use of Putrid Food. Most civilized people prefer meat that is fresh and sweet, to that which has become more or less tender by partial decomposition; still there is a large portion of the enlightened world that prefer the latter. Some barbarous nations prefer it after it has become quite putrid; as the Tartar and Siberian tribes and many others. The native New Zealanders, who eat large quantities of soaked and boiled corn, will not eat of it until after active putrefaction has set in from soaking. A decayed egg is said to be preferred by the Siamese to one just laid; and it is all the more esteemed if accompanied with an incipient chick. In England, esjjecially among the gourmands, fresh meat of any kind is not considered tit to eat until it has become repugnant to the refined olfactory organ. Venison especially is never put upon the table by them until the signs of its having been long killed are unequivocal. This peculiarity of taste is nothing new in the world, for we are tol...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Domestic Receipts. " L. S. 8.," Sacramento.—We can give only the receipts which yon send. To Make Com Bi cad: —Take one quart o\ meal, after sifting, put in two tablespoonfuls of brown sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt —too much salt in corn bread makes it hard— pour on boiling water until the meal is of the consistency of thick mush; when it is cool enough to work without burning your hand, put in half a cnp of yeast, then a coffee cupfull of flour, mix well and put in a well-buttered pan for baking; allow it to stand in a warm place for one hour, to rise; it must not rise as much as wheat bread, else it will fall in baking. Put it in the steamer, and steam for three honrs; then in the oven, and bake one hour. You will find this bread light and healthy. Corn bread should be made when other cooking is going on, to save fire and extra labor. To Make Wheat Bread. —The same correspondent sends the following: It is better to make four small loaves than one large one because a cut loaf d...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Mechanical Hints. Precautions in Making Varnish. —As heat is often used in dissolving gums for making varnish, there is always more or less danger of the mixtures taking fire from boiling over, upsetting or by some other accident. To avoid danger it is well to always have a piece of board close at hand to cover the top of the vessel, in case the spirits or other mixture takes lire within the vessel, as it sometimes does. A further precaution, and the only effectual one to use if the liquid boils over, is to have a piece of wet blanket always at hand, sufficiently large to cover both the vessel and the stove or fire. This (should be instantly thrown over in case of fire to, smother it. Water will be of little use; loose earth or sand is much better. These precautions should always be taken. To Bronze on Wood. — Having stained those parts intending for bronzing black, by any of the usual methods, take japanners' gold size and mix with a small portion of Eoman ochre and Prussian blue; ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Life Thoughts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Life Thoughts. Self-Reliance.—For that thou canst do thyself, rely not on another. The happiest man is the benevolent one for he owns stock in the happiness of all mankind. No man is master of himself so long as he is a slave to anything else. A Wise man makes more opportunies than he finds. Shakespeare defines charity: "Gently hear, kindly judge." Don't give up trying to do right. Whatsoever your trials may be, look above for strength to do your duty, and leave the result with God. If the highest life is that which is inspired by faith in God, the most efficient is that which is energized by a spirit of faithful labor. The aim of an honest man's life is not the happiness which serves only himself, but the virtue which is useful to others. Soekow comes soon enough without despondency; it does a man no good to carry around a lightning-rod to attract trouble. The man who feels remorse for the evil he has done is to be pitied; but there is one being still more unfortunate, he who feels...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to be a Man. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

How to be a Man. A few woods of advice to such young men as wish to be anything or to achieve anything in this great, busy, bustling world, is given in the Spectator of this city as, follows:— Ist. Would you be a man ! When Diogenes went through the city of Athens, with a lighted candle, in open daylihgt, being asked what he was looking for, he answered, " A vwn." Would you be a man, in the sense of Diogenes, in this famous laconic reply. If so, consider what it is to be "a man." Study the truest models of manhood. Make your ideal, and keeping it steadily in the mind, make a persistent, unremitting effort to grow up to this standard. Inquire, diligently, what are the elements upon which men of this pattern have subsisted and grown up to their noble proportions. Your having before your minds a grand ideal will stimulate and sustain your energies and by a mysterious law of your mental nature will operate a gradual conformity and approximation to this lofty standard, which habitually a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

CORRESPONDENCE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE AGRICULTURAL VALLEYS OF HUMBOLDT CO., NO. 2. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

THE AGRICULTURAL VALLEYS OF HUMBOLDT CO., NO. 2. Eel River Valley. Eel river empties into the ocean about eight miles south of Humboldt Bay. The scent ry in the vicinity of the mouth of the river, is bold and beautiful. Towering headlands project into the sea; Cape Mendooino on one side, and abrupt hills on the other. The valley widens out rapidly as we progress inland, until it swells and undulates for miles in extensive fertile meadow land, broad, productive basins. and fertile hillsides. This valley is the best settled portion of Humboldt County; the settlers are an unusually excellent class of people; their farms are under good cultivation; they have fine schools and schoolhouses all through the valley, several churches, good homesteads, some tine residences, ornamental grounds, thrifty orohards,and an abundance of life's comforts. Well into the heart of the, valley, we find the town of Rohnerville, a thriving place about four miles ride from Eureka. Three miles farther is Hydev...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CATTLE AND FISH CULTURE IN VERMONT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

CATTLE AND FISH CULTURE IN VERMONT. Editors Pukss:—Having lately made a short trip through parts of the four States of Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut, it occurred to me that some of your readers might be interested in a short account of some of those matters that came tinder my observation. I know that there is many a New England boy now tilling the fteldl of California who would like to take a look at his native State, and see the changes that have taken place since '4\K Perhaps to such my letter will not be unwelcome. We will begin in Vermont, at the old town of Rookingham, Windham county. The hills are steep and the valleys are narrow, but the pasture! are good and the hay is sweet, and many a drove of fat oxen and sheep go from here to the city markets. Those who farm on correct principles seem to be doing well, in spite of the whioing of the shiftless ones. By correct principles in farming, I mean rotating crops on tilled fields; keeping animals to turn a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Meteorological Observations. AT Sacramento, Cal., BY THOS. M. LOGAN, M. D. Permanent Secretary of State Board ot Health. Lat »T31'41" FT, Loner. )2l n2«'44//W. Hlghtjit Levee above mean low tide, at San Franei'oo, 74 feet. Hi«ht ol lower surface of mercury, 'II feet,. The aniolillt of OlOUdinea* is de<i(rnated by figure*, Id being entire olnudjneM; ft, half cloudiness; 0, entire clearness; ana Intermediate numhen in proportion. The force oi the wind is hlho registered In tin'same manner; 0 being a. calm, 1 a very light breeze, and 'Ha hurricane. The means.ire derived from three daily readme" at. 7 A. M.. 'i P. M.. and ft P. M., in uniformity with the arrangement! of the Smithsonian [mtitute. *Thermoinetograph. tKain. Hi'.MAiiKs —we luivcit wilHwieen in thisweek'itable,an installment of 0.830 inohei more of niin towards making up the complement dua thin month. HesjdeH the chances of setting a larger proportion of the average rain-fall for March, we have »t ill to expect a ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CITY MARKET REPORT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

CITY MARKET REPORT.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC PRODUCE AT WHOLESALE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

DOMESTIC PRODUCE AT WHOLESALE. S\n Fbaxohoo, Thurs., a. m., March 30th. FLOUB Has boon iv only moderate demand for either export or milling. We quote focal brands, superfine, $5.75(7? 0.00; extra, $7.00(27.25. Oregon brands, superfine, j55.50@55.75. Extra, $0.75@7.25. Transactions include 5,500 bbls. Cal. extra, •2,0011 bbls, Oregon extra, and 8,500 do. California and Oregon superfine, for export and private. WHEAT—The market still continues very dull, but firm. Two cargoes have been shipped but the receipts have been very light, and the rain-fall has not been sufficient to prompt any more activity in sales. The foreign demand is likely to bo good. The wheat crop of Belgium has boon badly injured by the severe winter, and the fall sown wheat fields are being plowed up for spring crops. The stocks in German ports an 1 small with a good demand for wheat for future and present for France and Belgium. Sales during the week have averaged some 6,000 sacks, from $2.40(a)52.50. At the close...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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