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Elephind.com contains 7,005 items from Richmond Guardian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Mr. Tudor's Opponent Makes Inauspicious Opening Speech—Senseless Youths Jeer at Clergyman and Anzac Hero. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

Mr. Tudor's Opponent Makes Inlus= picious Opening Speech-Seriselesi Youths Jeer at Clergyman ind Anzac Hero. Charles Louis Copeland, the Nat ional Federation candidate for Yarra, mounted a lorry at the foot of Stan ley-street and opened his campaign last Friday night. Councillor W. Bur gess read the "Guardian" nbte that the young man in khaki was playing a lone hand, and he came down to take the chair. Drizzling rain accom panied his opening remarks, but the crowd increased in numbers. There was a "Hear, hear, Billy," when the chairman said that Richmond could be depended upon to give the candi date a "fair go." Sergeant Copeland was in ordinary civilian costume. -Those in front gave him a bit of encouragement. They put their hands together. Sergeanit'Cope land began to repeat the old story of how the war began, but the crowd became impatient. "Give us your pol icy," was one interjection. "My pol iev is Win-the-War," replied Copeland. Such an answer was satisfactory enough to those ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mr. G. C. Russell New President of Burnley Progress Association — Church Street Bridge, Tram Fares and Lighting Discussed. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

Mr. G. C. Russell New President of Burnley Progress Association - Church Street Bridge, Tram Fares and Lighting Discussed. President Shields occupied the chair for the last time at the annual meeting of the above association, held in St. Bartholomew's Parish Hall, on Saturday evening. After routine busi ness had been disposed of, the elec tion of officers to manage the affairs of the Association during the ensuing twelve months was proceeded with. The following were elected:--Presi dent, Mr. G. C. -Russell; vice-presi dent, Mr. J. R. Green; treasurer, Mr. A. E. Smith; committee, Messrs. S. Halliday, R. Knape, J. Shields, H. Gawler and J. Scott; press corres pondent, Mr. A. J. Curtis; secretary, Mr. H. M. Kennedy. It was resolved to direct the atten tion of the Richmond Council to the bad state of the Richmond half of the Church-street bridge. Incidentally, the anbmalies in connection with the fares charged on the electric trams, the bad lighting of the principal street corners (espe...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GAS MASKS and GOGGLES RICHMOND BOYS IN THE GREAT ADVANCE. LIVELY LETTERS FROM THE FIRING LINE. SOLDIER'S APPEAL TO SHORTEN THE SUFFERINGS. MORE APPRECIATION OF "THE GUARDIAN." [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

OAS MASKS and GOGGLES RICHMOND BOYS IN THE GREAT ADVANCE. LIVELY LETTERS FROM T?iE FIRING LINE. SOLDIER'S APPEAL TO SHORTEN THE SUFFERINGS. MORE APPRECIATION OF "THE GUARDIAN." Casualties from Richmond since our last list include: Killed in Action. Corporal A. Ross, Privates J. A. Cozens, G. Young. Severely Wounded. Private P. Scharp, J. G. Fyfe and N. C. Wills. Wounded. Privates J. O. Murphy, A. J. Mur ray, J. McKenzie, J. Coleman, P. T. Clark, H. Duggan, G. H. Pile, E. M. Russell, Sergeant J. J. Sheehan. Seriously Ill. Private E. L. Bennett. Enlistments from Richmond since our last list include:-F. J. Dyer, P. G. Need, J. Shiels, N. Gardner, J. McGolderick, L. A. Kneale, W. West head, W. H. Sheppard, J. H. Dunn, R. Arnott, C. S. Thomas, J. P. G. Grace, W. S. Sims, F. Myers, R. Webb, W. H. Hodges. Private Hughie Williams, as well known as any fellow ever was among the best-and worst-in this and other towns, is living the life at Lark Hill Camp, Salisbury, where he re cently arrived...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Candidate Copeland and His "Many Friends"—Burlesque Show in Small Town Hall. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

Candidate Copeland and His "Many Friends"-Burlesque Show in Small Town Hall. Nothing funnier or more farcical than the preliminary meeting of friends and supporters of Sergeant Copeland in Richmond Town Hall (small) has taken place here for some years. It was a scream from the be ginning. The candidate arrived at the tick of eight. "I am pleased to see so many friends," he is said to have remarked. He found out at the finish that he did not have one half so many "friends" in that hall as he at first supposed. There was a hitch at the start. A chairman had to be elected. Some body suggested Tom Pepper, and somebody else Mr. Angus McLachlan, J.P.-one of Mr. Tudor's thick-and thin supporters. There was a laugh but no response from either, and the chair was still vacant. "Cr. Kemp," called a voice. "Yes, why not Kemp?" kidded in the crowd at the rear of the room. Cr. Kemp stepped forward. "That's settled Copeland," chipped in a prophet. It was, indeed, an omen. Cr. Kemp has fought in so...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Alpine Warfare. ITALY'S "HANDY" SOLDIERS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

Alpine Warfare. .ITALY'S "HANDY" SOLDIERS. (By Dr. Mario Borsa.) Italian General Headquarters. One. of the most typical means of transport in Alpine warfare is the one our soldiers call "wire ways." These consist- of steel cables, slung from ridge to ridge, that span yawn, ing depths,.or reach almost vertically into the clouds. Up to these cables travel guns and food, as well as tim ber for the huts and men for the trenches. Down them come the wounded. There are about 300 fixed installations of "wire ways"; some of them have a length of seven miles and a carrying capacity of 8001b. Be sides the fixed ones, there are also the movable "wire ways." These are in sections, easily mounted and dis mounted, and can be transported from one place to another in twenty-four hours. In their gradual and. costly con quest .of the heights held' by the en emy the Italian troops had to carry everything with them-food, water, timber. Water is lacking, not only on the Carso plateau, but also in sev era...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE VALLEY OF THE SHADOW. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

THE VALLEY OF THE SHADOW. 'All still on the line." So official re 'porter Will send to the Press the report of last night. 'Tis true! No battalions leapt out to the slaughter 'Neath the bursting of shells or the scream of. their flight. Crouched .in my dug-out, I passed the long hours, And watched the pale moon to the' parapet sink. ,-Rats-fea-rful no 'longer of mana or his - powers Mrde fetid the air with-,their -.car rion stink. "All still on the 'line!" Past thes-:q?uare sandbag setting That stood for a door, in ;the: sha - dowy gloom, Two figufres passed' upright,- the- night silhouetting A third, very still 'gainst the slieen 3f the moon. .: Just a stray shot from a casual sniper, Guided by Death. across No - Man's :Land, And His human harvest to-night is riper. -As the pick falls down from the sapper's hand. "Only one man"-'tis the hourly story, Too -trivial, far, for the bulletin board. No' florid columns shall -. paean. his glory. "All still on-the line" is their only word. ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Harry Lauder Scored. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

Harry Lauder Scored. In spite of-his great success, Harry. Lauder has never become ~spoiled," and he hates snobbery with a whole some hatred. He relates a neat snub that he -ad ministered on one occasion to a some what conceited member of the aristo cracy. "A certain nobleman was introduced to me one night," he says, "who asked me to dine with him. I accepted, and then he hesitated and said: 'I don't mean dine at home, you know. .My wife doesn't approve of--er-music hall people, you know. I mean, dine at my club." "'At your club?" said I, with a hor rified look... 'Oh, no!. No' -thank you, my-lcrd. I'm sorry to have to decline, .but -the-fact is;-'ydu know;, my wife doesn't approve of-er-c-lubmen." Wainted-A. boy. to deliver oysters that can ride a bicycle.-Martinsville (U.S.A.) "Bulletin." Oystes. that can ride a-...bicycle ought to do well in vaudeville.--Hous ton "Post." To which we add that any oyster at present quotations would be asham ed to ride in anything, but its own touri...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A WAR PROPHECY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

A WAR PROPHECY. The story that holds pride of place as a prophecy of this war is that of the experience of the first German Emperor William at a soothsayer's in 1849. As William was leaving the tent the woman called to him and said, "I will tell you one more thing. What year is it?" "1849," answered the King. "Add 1 and 8 and 4 and 9 together, and add it to 1849. It will be the year of your kingdom's greatest triumph." "1871? Perhaps," said William, and once more prepared to go. Again the soothsayer recalled .him. "Do you want to know the date of your own death? Treat the figures of 1871 in the same way." The King did so. "1888? A long enough life, in all conscience." A third time the woman called him back. "If you wish to know the year in which your great kingdom will tot ter to its fall, do the same to 1888." And in 1913 the great European treason was devised and inaugurated by the fatal demand of Austria that Italy should help her to crush Ser bia out of existence.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RAILWAY BUILT OVER THE SEA. Connects Island with Mainland. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

RAILWAY BUILT. OVER THE SEA. Connects Island with Mainland. The building of a railway more than four miles long over the sea is a prodigious feat, especially when there are such difficulties as violent storms and floods to contend with, yet the engineers of the Key West Div ision of the Florida East Coast Rail way managed to build track over a hundred miles long which connected the islands with the mainland. The Florida Keys are islands situat ed at the south of the Florida Penin sula. One of these, Key West, is four miles long and one mile wide, and has quite a large population. The building of a railway which would connect the islands together with the mainland was started four teen years back The work was accomplished with the aid of dredges, pile-drivers, and all sorts of boats to carry up sup plies. When the work was well under way a terrific hurricane swept away practically the 'whole of a year's work. Many men were lost, besides some £6000 worth of material. The bridges that ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OLD MAXIMS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

OLD MAXIMS. The fine old maxims sometimes fail, and show themselves of small avail. My father used to say to me, "Salt down the dimes, wher'er you be. It isn't what a fellow makes that saves him from financial breaks, but what he wisely puts away, against the dark and rainy day." All through my youth I heard this spiel, "Salt down, salt down the shin ing wheel," so when I came to man's estate, I thought the scheme was truly great. I watched with pity oth er lads, who lavishly blew in the scads, as to the bank I took my way, with hard-earned kopecks, every day. They went to dances and the like; they raced fast trotters on the pike; they blew in money on the girls, and swelled around like belted earls. And I deried myself all fun, and buckled down to saving mon, and as I toiled I often said, "These lads who paint the village red, and throw the useful plunks away, will all be broke, some bitter day. And while they for a handout yell, in Easy-street I hope to dwell." And so I slaved and...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
When Pa Is Sick. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

When Pa Is Sick. When pa Is sick, he's scared to death, An' ma an' us just holds our breath; He crawls in bed, an' puffs and grunts, And does all kinds of crazy stunts. He wants "Doc." Brown, an' mighty quick, For when pa's ill he's awful sick. He gasps and groans, an' sort o' sighs, He talks so queer, an' rolls his eyes. Ma jumps an' runs, an' all of us, An' all the house is in a fuss. An' peace an' joy is mighty skeerce When pa is sick it's something fierce. When Ma Is Sick. When ma is sick, she pegs away; She's quiet, though, not much to say. She goes right on a-doin' things, An' sometimes laughs, or even sings, She says she don't feel extra well, But then it's just a kind o' spell. She'll be all right to-morrow, sure, A good old sleep will be the cure. An' pa, he sniffs an' makes no kick, For women-folk is always sick. An' ma, she smiles, lets on she's glad When ma is sick it ain't so bad.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Lesson of Samson. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

The Lesson of Samson. There is a lad in a town in New Hampshire, where the thrifty mothers are still wont to cut their children's hair by means of a pair of shears and a bowl, who has always felt that sort of thing to be a degra dation. In Sunday-school the teacher told the class of which this boy was a member the story of Samson and De lilah. When she had finished she said to him: "Henry, what do you learn from the Samson story?" "That it don't never pay," respond ed Harry promptly, "to let a woman cut a feller's hair." The following speech was made by an Irish barrister on behalf of his client whose cow had been killed by a train: "If the train had been run as it should have been ran, or if the bell had been rung as it should have been rang, or if the whistle had been blown as it should have been blew, both of which they did neither, the cow would .not have been Injured when she was killed."

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ROBIN'S SONG. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

THE. ROBIN'S SONG. Wounr you be blithe when the sun's shut out? Watch the robin! Chirpi~g, carolling, mocking doubt That's the robin! Winds are cold and the ground is wet; Crumbs and berries are scarce; but yet "Things are taking a turn; don't fret," Sings the robin. Songs are dreary and drab and glum; Watch the robin! Sure, still sure that the spring will come Is the robin. Still he sings you a happy verse: "What's December but April's nurse? Things are bad, but they might be worse," Pipes the robin. Are you sick with a secret fear? Watch the robin! Thanks, what thanks for each crumb of cheer Gives the robin! Longest lanes have a turn, a bend; Longest troubles are bound to end. "When things get to the worst they mend," Chirps the robin. Hope burns high when the sun Is low; Watch the robin! Singing, "Are we down-hearted? No!" Goes the robin. How he sang, when the light was hid Under a sky like a great grey lid, "Things are taking a turn." They did! Trust the robin! •- -------:- . , ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

I- DON'T TRUST YOUR MEMORY % lL O/I TO TIHE 'S. , EVER?G-CHANGI:NG LIKENESS I·.amOF YOUR I KITH and KIN or FRIEND ,_ _ xpert artists ensure perfect ' pictures. _.. _ Pu*- -'+ , €-,: othing left to chance-care fulne-s predominates. Sie-like portraits from any Thot .E IS NON photo. . ..... NEED TO WORRY Iterations made if neces sary. When you place an order for o,- .an Enlargement with us tion. SUCCESS IS ASSURIED eputation our recommenda- SUCCESS IS ASSURED roups from various photos Our unique and great know on one picture. ledge, combined with our E nquiries welcomed. Call or .. practicability, is ask us to call. - YOURS for the ASKING ilitary photos are a special- ?COME TO-DAY. ity. COME TO-DAY. xcellent results from the Don't delay any longer most faded photo. "That's the place." on-Fadoable Guaranteed. Take down that old photo to atisfaction is assured. STHIS IS THE PLACE "WHERE THEY DO THEM BETTER." 'PHONE-CENTRAL 1430. WRITE OR CALL. International Portraits Co., Sf(L. A &am...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Regular Cheer. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

A Regular Cheer. "I hear," said a member of the church to the young parson-"I hear that you have an offer from another church." "Yes," the minister replied, "I have a call offering four thousand dollars a year." "And what," the friend inquired, "are you getting now?" "Nine hundred." "And you call the other a call, I should think it was nothing short of a yell."

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Not So Pious After All. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

Not So Pious After All. One afternoon a tramp knocked at the door of a suburban home, and when the owner of the house appeared, he meekly asked for a small piece of bread. "I see," responded the householder critically, sizing up the unwelcome visitor, "that the knees of your trous ers are badly worn." "Yes, sir," answered the tramp, "I wore them through kneeling in prayer." Much touched by this proof of piety, the householder gave the man a good ly portion of food, and with many thanks the latter turned and started to move away. "Just a moment," exclaimed the householder, "I notice that your trous ers are also pretty badly worn at the back." * "Yes, sir," replied the tramp, steer ing for the gate, "I did that backslid ing!"

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Breaking It Gently. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

Breaking It Gently. "I understand that your daughter is going to take music lessons." "Not exactly," replied Farmer Corntossel. "We haven't the heart to tell her that her voice sounds ter rible, so we're goin' to hire a regular teacher to do it."

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Equine Heroes of the War AS NUMEROUS AS THE HUMAN. WITH THE BRITISH ARMIES IN FRANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

IEquine Heroes of the War AS NUMEROUS AS THE HUMAN. WITH THE BRITISH ARMIES IN FRANCE. It would be difficult to find a more pampered lot of beings than the war horses. In the stress of battle they suffer with the men, but the number of equine "casualties" among the hun dreds of thousands of horses em ployed is very small. There are veterans among the horses Who have been wounded three or four times; there are even those wno have suffered nervous break downs from the shattering shock of shells. If they were men in khaki they would have gold stripes of hon or upon their sleeves, but the faith iul old horses go back to the' front time and time again, asking nothing in the way of rank or distinction. What they get instead is the very best of food and plenty of it, the kind est of care and the keenest apprecia tion of the services they render. Vis itors to the battle zone invariably ex press amazement at the appearance and condition of the horses. Just now they are snug and warm under th...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
St. Stephen's Harriers Hold Annual Meeting on Thursday— Question of Continuing Pastime This Season to be Considered. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

St. Stephen's Harriers Hold Annual Meeting on Thursday-Question of Continuing Pastime This Season to be Considered. The ninth annual meeting of the St. Stephen's Harriers will be held in St. Stephen's Parish Hall on Thurs day evening. On the success of this meeting depends, to a large extent, the future existence of the club. All youths and young men of the parish are invited to be present and decide for themselves whether or not cross country running should be continued this season, The committee are par ticularly anxious to enrol a large num ber of Junior members, for whom a specially low membership fee will probably be arranged. Past and pre sent members are specially urged to maked a p6init of attending. The business to be considered includes the presentation of the report and bal ance-sheet and the election of office bearers for the coming season.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARRYING AN EDITOR. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 21 April 1917

MARRYING AN EDITOR. By His Wife. Yes, I'm Mrs. Peter Snow, an edi tor's wife. 1 well remember the day when Mr. Snow asked me to become his wife. I confess I liked Mr. Snow, and, thinking it would be a fine thing to be the wife of an editor, I said "Yes" as prettily as I knew how, and I became Mrs. Snow. I have seen -ten years of married life, and find my hus band to be an amiable, good-natured man. He always spends his evenings at home, and is in that respect a model man; but he always brings home a pile of manuscripts and papers which is only limited by the length of his arms, and reads and reads and reads, while I patch the knees and el bows of his trousers and coat. I break the stillness by asking: "Mr. Snow, did you order that coal I spoke to you about?" "What did you say, my dear?" he asks, after a minute's silence. "Did you order that coal I spoke to you about?" "Indeed, my dear, I'm sorry; but I forgot all about it. It shall come to morrow." Another hour's silence, which is r...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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