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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

vy ya fry-y k "'"TF'f r,'s' ., - - -r.-r -r- f r"-wF''7f'T,rFii'!(iwwjijPn'iW The Indian Advocate. 180 ADVESNT. VSWWA &' - The name of Advent is given to four weeks preceeding the Holy Feast of Christmas. The name is of Latin origin and signifies coming. It is evidently very appropriate, because it is applied to the coming of Christ upon earth, which is pre eminently the coming for us men. We may distinguish four Advents of Christ: His Advent in the Incarnation, "And the Word was made flesh and dwelt amoug us." His second Ad vent is by the grace of the Holy Ghost into the hearts of men, "If any one love Me, My Father will love him, and we will come to Him and will make our abode with Him." The third Advent of Christ is at the time of the departure of the soul from this earth, of which St. James says: "Be patient, there fore, brethren, until the coming of the Lord. The coming of the Lord is at hand. Behold, the Judge standeth before the door." The final Advent of Christ, on the d...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

- t-"stv 1 181 The Indian Advocate. , The observance of Advent seems to hf-ve originated in France, in the diocese of Tours, where, in the Sixth century, o fasting was enjoined three times a week from the feast of St. Martin until Christmas. From Tours the practice spread to other parts of France, and Rome adopted it before the end of the Sixth century. In the Seventh century we see Advent ob served in nearly all countries by fasting and extraordinary prac tices of devotion. In the Greek Church it was not introduced until the Eighth century. '"The time and duration of Advent, it is true, were not iden tical everywhere. The Greeks began it with the feast of St. Philip, on the 14th day of November, and they called the fasts of this season, for that reason, the fasts of St. Philip. The Gothic rite celebrated only two Sundays of Advent; the Gallican Sacramentaries three; the Church of Milan and Spain had six Sundays. Some placed the beginning of Advent in the beginning of the month of D...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 182 chant peculiarly of Holy Christmas-day, for which we are now only preparing. The organ is not played at High Mass (the third Sunday excepted). All festivities and noisy celebrations, as all public and solemn marriages, are prohibited during this time. The lessons of the Divine office are mostly from the $ prophet Isaias, announcing the coming of the Redeemer and exhorting the people to prepare by penance and righteousness. Isaias is called "the prophetic evangelist," because his prophe cies concerning the coming of Christ are so detailed and defi nite as if he had been an eye-witness to the reality, and merely recorded it as an evangelist.' The prayers and x.n thems of the Church all voice this disposition of penance, and entreat God for grace to purify and worthily prepare our hearts. The gospel of the first Sunday of this time terrifies us by its vivid picture of the last Advent of Christ as Judge, and on the other Sundays we hear the voice of John the Bap...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

..lilllPIMII 183 Tun Indian Advocate. is the feature of all "things in time. Of earthly things the wise man has thus expressed it: "The sun riseth and goeth down, and returneth to his place, there rising again. All ,the rivers run into the sea; unto the place from whence rivers come, they return, to flow again." In the Heavens the spheres revolve in their great orbits, to begin again after having completed their -j 1 r 1 , , .1 . 1 . tiCn l, oiig course, ui numan Kinci me preacner agaiu aciys. wi r generation cometh," only to pass away in its turn. We see all -men restlessly busy and active, each in his own sphere, N with his own purposes, towards his own end, regardless of others, stopping at nothing, engaged in incessant toil and hurry. We, ourselves, find time growing rapidly and relent lessly upon us twenty, thirty, fifty, perhaps eighty years have passed! One moment chases the other, and every moment adds to the days and years. We would fain grasp a moment and fix it, and pause...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 184 ?j y passed the sea with its bounds, when He balanced the founda tions of the earth, I was with him forming all these things." In these long ages, during which the worlds were forming, Christ, the Godman, was present, and coeval to all those creations. Yes, throughout all eternity, He was present to the infinite mind of God as the ideal after which all should be created, and for whom all sould be created. This is the great yesterday of St. Paul, when he" speaks of Christ's existence. In the age of mankind Christ was still more truly the Al pha and Omega, the beginning and the end. He was the hope, the stay, the consolation of the entire Old Law, not only for the Jews, but for all nations, "He shall be the expectation of the peoples." He appeared to the patriarchs, He was the angel guiding the course of the chosen people, He was the vis ion of the prophets. And how truly present is He to us in the New Law; pres ent to all men as the Redeemer, present in His H...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

185 The Indian Advocate. THE ADVENT OF LIFE. All of our life might be called an Advent. Our life on earth is a time of expectation and of preparation for the com ing of Christ. It is a time of penance and suffering, through which we must become conform to Christ. It is a time of perpetual unrest, of aching desire, of unsatisfied craving, true to 4he words of St. Augustine: "Our heart is unquiet, until it rests in Thee, O God!" But there is another season of Ad vent, even after life. THE ADVENT OF PURGATORY. The souls in Purgatory are making the last preparation for the coming of Christ. Their preparation is one of peniten tial suffering far more than the Advent upon earth. Their longing for Christ is as intense as was that of the just of the Old Law, with whom they cry out: "Drop down dew, ye Heavens from above, and let the clouds rain the just one. Let the earth be opened and bud forth a Savior." The great anti- phons of Advent apply with double force to these Holy souls. ' $ "O Le...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

Rpfvnpop1: Xfrw7qryr'rw " fwf 'm f&w n Tine Indian Advocate 186 A SONG, iiiHlfJ&iiilaYrfilftAinfcAMirtiiW.Tl'il'jtiaiitoVflTMii - - J Sad loss and happy finding, So we pass along; What to-day we are binding, 0 so firm and strong, With the tears of sorrow We shall loose to tomorrow. Laughing for the foolishness, Weeping for the wrong. With tears our smiles combining, So the days go by; Young eyes brightly shining Shall not long be dry. Dies the merry laughter, Follow swift thereafter Tears that drown all happiness Souls that smiles defy. .Laugh while laughter pleases, Weep when mirth is done; .Every day's light ceases With the setting sun. Youth and health are flying, All the world is dying; To 'the sea of restfulness All the rivers run. "Chota Wallah:' 'J& 4$i '.;, J

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

JQft"r irr-Tm; inf JtK, i -- f -. - ' -y -- 7 -r r-" rwTp" "VT" 187. Tun. Indian Advocate. ROLL OF1 HONOR. L r cornice ;js jjiopa rtment. Juniors. Ayliff Mooie, Jacob Stucki, W. Piazzi, Horace Wilson, R. Richardson, H. C. Hill, Webster Whitehead, Thos. O'Dea, John Haster, Wm. Fender, Leo Rodke. Seniors. E. Kretschmar, A. Mohat, Wm. lsbcll, P. Grotz, G. C. Holloway, M. Stoll. If you would relish your food, labor for it; if you would enjoy your raiment, pay for it before you wear it; if you would sleep soundly, take a clean conscience to bed with you. Irascible man (at one end of the 'phone). "Is there a blithering idiot at the end of this 'phone?" Voice from the other end: "Not at this end, sir!" Buyer (entering poultry shop): "I should like to see a nice fat goose." Small boy: "Yes, sir; mother will be down directly." Indian School. Stephen Ncghanquet, John Hardin, Thurman O'Gee, Clarence O'Gee, Fiankie Wano, David . y Bruno, Oliver Peltier, Michael McDole. " Alumna rn. Albert Trace...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

1900, CALENDAR 1900, 2 DECEMBER, 2 X X, wyNwwvi I 2 3 4 5 .,- 6 7 8 9 io ii 12 13 15 16 M 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 4 r , St. Stanislaus Kostka, C. D. 1 st Sunday of Advent, Semid. St. Francis Xavier, C. D. St. Peter Chrysologfus, P. C. D. 1 4 St. Andrew Avelini," CD. St. Nicholas, P. C. D. Vigil St. Ambrose, P. C. D. D. Immaculate Conception, D. 1st cl. with Oct. 2nd Sunday of Advent, Semid. Transl. of the Holy House, D. maj. St. Damase, Pope C. Semid. Octave, Semid. St. Lucy, V. M. D. St. Dominic Silos, Abbot, O. S. B. Octave of the Immaculate Concept., 3rd Sunday of Advent, Semid. Of the Feria, Semid. Expectation B. M. V. D. maj. (Ember Day) Bl. Urban V. Pope C, O. S. B. (Vigil) Of the Feria, Semid. (Ember Day) St. Thomas the Apostle, D. 2d cl. (Ember Day) Of the Feria, Semid. 4th Sunday of Advent, Semid. Vigil of Christmas, Semid. Christmas-day, D. 1st cl. with Oct. St. Stephen Protomartyr, D. 2d cl. with Oct. St. John the Apostle, D. 2d cl. with Oct. Holy Innoce...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

v rtF 5k. T ." X tf v 3? ivs .v 1 iVAK3Kif3 JJn5 iffftfc yv ,n niaHESsPfexH .i.'Wjii?iu.m;H,i t --flB JBSn 'Jt'fe'Jv JiA&'tS! A J

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

3g . 'TY-rtf.- w- THE ZEw&& aBS " j$-- Mt 11 '.qfc U JflAJbtX . Home, Sweet Home. Seminoles, (Continue Iaroe IAAJMMfc Vlndians.To Pay the Seminole Glaim.B ricks and Mbrt,Faoiiie; PW"' Tyjiii il , C? ,"t- Ti ,t iriJ XT t J 1-i. TV t Itti.!',; y ;; Jiuuuriius. too job, U..7- A?cuuuue ews. ri-utats.rrtr13 J0 w FW-JkTri'lr TmuinWe ' htrilinm fNftr'at'TCtrat timiirrlU 'PlMaiM fcft tt yHeaft of jeus;CalenyCr. Gnristmas aftlie. 6oligeprhfs; Vvwas -inserted, in "the" front' part, as'thebody6f:theA'bvbTii.'i "att The bird, that soars to yonder skies Though nigh to heaven, still seems unblessed; It leaves them, and with rapture flies Downward to its own much-loved nest. When heaven shall bid this soul depart, This form return to kindred earth, May the last throb, which swells my heart Heave, where it started into birth. And should affection shed one tear, Should friendship linger round my tomb; ' The tribute will be doubly dear, When given by those of "Home, .Sweet Home." -a m

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

k fc Vol. XIII. H to A "T THE ADVOQTL January, 1901. No. 1. HOME, SWETCT HOME, srsssssKrssstS0 OME! how that blessed word thrills the ear. In it what recollections blend! ' It tells of childhood's scenes so dear, And speaks of many a cherished friend. - O! through the world, where'er we roam, Though souls be pure and lips be kind, The heart with fondness turns to home, Still turns to those it left behind. The bird, that soars to yonder skies, Though nigh to heaven, still seems unblessed; It, leaves them, and with rapture flies Downward to its own much-loved nest. When heaven shall bid this soul depart, This form return to kindred earth, May the last throb, which swells my heart Heave, where it started into birth. And should affection shed one tear, Should friendship linger round my tomb; The tribute will be doubly dear, When given by those of "Home, Sweet Home." ?

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

' ' JI'JP'i-ti!''l'l""''T' T " The Indian Advocate. THE SEMINOLE1S. WVNAAAAAAAAA AT HOME. A VISIT to a Seminole camp reveals many interesting lit tle things which touch the heart and enlist the sympathy of the observer. The affection displayed by the stern faced father, when coddling his pappoose, convinces the most skeptical that in the barbarian of the forest "the heart of man answers to heart as face to face in water," whatever the skin it beats under. Where the Seminole is hospitable, is around the camp fire and the "sof-ka" kettle. "Hum-bux-chay" (come eat) is his salutation. The kettle is placed in some convenient part of the camp and at the meal hour the members of the house hold sit around it. A large sof-ka spoon rests in the pot and is handed from one to another, each taking a single mouthful. A fastidious taste might shrink from using the large spoon, but to affect such taste would be to offend mine host. Sof-ka is the Seminole standard dish, and is simply a stew made by ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

"S'f fT V'" The Indian Advocate. &' 5v make dolls and play houses, revel in mud pies, roast the small birds they kill before a "spit-fife," and play they are roasting wild turkey. They rarely cry, as they are taught from infancy to show no such weakness; they must obey the slightest command of their elders. The little four-year-old is taught to assist in the duties of the camp. He can carry wa ter, gather wood, watch the little pappoose, and learns thus early that he is an important factor in the tribe. The boys are allowed to handle no weapons until old enough to use them successfully. When an Indian boy is taught to use a Winchester and returns from the chase with his first deer, favors are shown him by the elders, tokens are presented and he becomes for the time the young nimrod of the tribe. Seminole children are on the whole very much like other children some bright, some stupid, some good, some perverse, all exceedingly human. With the discipline al ready instilled into th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

gw-VT"TF;-xT- - WT. 7TfMWIlfJIJ( MUm V The Indian Advocate. , kerchiefs from around his neck. As each article was removed, the Indian became less conspicuous. After divesting himself of six or eight shirts, and eight or ten handkerchiefs, the In dian and his costume now blended with the surrounding ob jects. His dusky form was in perfect symphony with the dead leaves and grasses, through which he silently crept to wards his prey. To-day, as we meet the Seminole "at home," we find the wigwam made of palmetto leaves and the skins of wild animals; the floor of this structure is made of split logs and elevated about two feei above the ground. A few of the In dians have in late years built board houses, but the roof is made of palmetto thatch. Here, surrounded by the gloom and wierdness of the Everglades, miles from white man's habitation, the baying of the alligator, the hooting of the great horn owl and the croaking of the heron are the only 'sounds to be heard. Truly the picture is on...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

Tins Indian Advocate. are supported for their benefit. This independent Indian does not increase the expense of the jail nor of the penitentiary; he is no starving Indian who must be fed at the expense of the Government. In these red sons of the forest we meet the original "real Indian" unchanged by contact with the white man. The visitor of the "Wild West" who complains that "the Indians do not look like the Indians of fifty years ago'" would have little ground of complaint were he to visit the Seminoles in their marshy fastnesses. In personal appearance, many a Seminole brave might be taken as a type of physical excellence. He is bright, copper in color, is over six feet in height; his carriage is self-reliant, deliberate and strong. His step has all the 'lightness and elasticity that nature and practice can combine to produce as lithe and soft as the tread of a tiger. The Yale, the Harvard or the Oxford student with years of training in the athletic school, would be but a novice ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

Tin? Indian Advocatk. whole with brilliant effect. With young braves the more im portant the occasion, the more enormous the turban. Another characteristic of the dress is the number of handkerchiefs worn, knotted loosely about the neck. Regardless of temper ature, the Indian adorns himself with more or less bright ban dannas, exhibiting great pride in the number he possesses. A belt made of buckskin completes the costume. From this are suspended a hunting knife, a revolver, a pouch in which is carried the ammunition and small articles necessary for the chase. The physique of the women will compare favorably with that of the men. They are healthy and robust, and among the younger members some comely well-featured women are found. The dress of the squaw is very simple, consisting of a straight, full skirt, made long enough to hide the feet.- The upper part of the dress is a long sleeved, loose fitting waist, which fails to meet the waist band of the skirt by about two inches; this'od...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

Tn Ks In di an Advocate. 7 on festal occasions. What the turban is to the brave such is the necklace of beads to the woman. It is her chief glory and is worn constantly. Her ambition seems to be to gather as many strings of these brightly colored beads about the neck as she can carry, often burdening herself with several pounds. Even the wee tots are adorned with small strings of the much prized necklace. Music is not a genius with the Seminoles. True, they have some songs which are monotone and rythmical. They are the hunter's songs, the camp songs and the lullabys. The war songs which sent such terror to the hearts of the white settlers in the Seminole war days, they seem to have forgotten. Some of the Indians have natural musical ears, and they are recognized by their people as musical leaders. They have no standard of pitch, but start their songs where the natural quality of the voice renders it easiest to sing. The pitch of the song depends upon the individual. An incident, ful...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

The Indian Advocate. ISSUE DAY, HOW RATIONS ARE ISSUED AT TELE KIOWA AGENCY. REGULAR bi-weekly issues of rations are made at Ana darko to all the Indians on both reservations, the aggre gate quantities of the principal articles issued during a year 'being about three million five hundred thousand pounds of flour. For bi-weekly issues the agent is first required to di vide the year's supply of each article into twenty-six equal parts, which gives him one part for each issue in the year. One part is then divided by the whole number of Indians on the reservation, and that gives the ration of each Indian at each issue. " . Once a year an actual count of all the Indians is made, and the census roll of each band corrected by subtracting the deaths and adding the births. This is a piece of work that requires great care and watchfulness, for many of these once guileless children of the prairies are now civilized to the de gree that they are not too truthful to deny deaths, nor too honest to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1901

The Indian Advocate. opened, so as to be convenient for weighing and measuring by the family ration. The squaws are admitted in line at one door, and pass out at another. The issue clerk is sta tioned with the interpreter near the entrance. When the squaw presents her ticket to him, he punches out the date and calls the number of rations. She hands her sacks across the counter, and one employe gives her flour, another sugar and salt, another beans and rice, and another soap and baking powder. In this way issues can be made with accuracy to sever al hundred in a day. The Indian police are required to pre serve order and keep the women from crowding. A number of chiefs also always attend, to see that the issue is fairly made, and to sign the agent's vouchers. For issuing the beef cattle, the agent divides the In dians into "beef bands" of twenty-five and fifty persons, and appoints a "beef chief" for each band. At Anadarko the bands of twenty-five get one beef, and those of fifty get ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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