ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,070 results
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

February 1993 'jpftlK, <®yj ' i ■^^ :, ■s : ■'^ -"•— "*"|- '" '■, h iJ/v> 'sH' ■"■■" Chris Kasenchak helps register the more than 500 people scheduled to attend the VFBF's annual Convention. (Photo by Kathy Dixon) Convention survey indicates success By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—The 1992 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Convention has received mixed reviews. Based on the responses from 215 voting delegates who filled out post-convention surveys, the majority were pleased with the overall meeting. However, many were not pleased with the banquet meal and some wanted a change of location. But despite the constructive criticism, VFBF convention committee members noted that 98 percent of the survey respondents rated last year's meeting either' 'excellent" or "good." That means, aside from a few specific areas, the format of VFBF's annual convention will remain the same. Plans for each convention originate from comments from the last year's meeting. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

4 Feb. 4: 4-H Ambassador Day, Capitol, Richmond. Contact John Dooley, executive director, state 4-H office, Virginia Tech, 703-231-6371. Feb. 4: Virginia feeder pig sale, Farmville, 2:30 p.m. Contact John Parker, Virginia Pork Industry Board, 804-786-7092. Feb. 4: Virginia Forage and Grassland Council's area forage conference, American Legion Building, Gretna. Contact Harlan White, Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, 703-231-9802. Feb. 4-5: American Farm Bureau Federation National Leadership Conference, offered to members through satellite teleconference, Richmond. Contact Greg Hicks, coordinator, 804-225-7527. Feb. 4-5: Timber Income Tax Workshop, Donaldson Brown Continuing Education Center, Virginia Tech. Contact Harry Haney, Virginia Tech, 703-231-5212. Feb. 5-6: Second annual Farming for the Future Conference, Penn State Univ., College Park, PA. Call 814-349-9856. Feb. 6-7: Second annual equine seminar, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Sponsored by Southern Landowners and b...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

February 1993 Mary Frances Houff has long fist of FB accomplishments By GREG KICKS VFBF Communications Director FISHERSVILLE —When Mary Frances Houff came unexpectedly to Farm Bureau more than two decades ago, "there were concepts (in the organization), but not programs," she recalled. Since she began volunteering her time and efforts to the Augusta County Farm Bureau, the organization has seen the rise of the Young Farmers program, the Rural Health program and countless other projects that benefit the needy, the elderly, the young and the farmer. The programs are now squarely fitted on the concepts. Last fall, Ms. Houff retired from the Augusta County Board of Directors after a 22-year tenure. The county Farm Bureau presented her with a 12-foot scroll listing her accomplishments over the years. In addition, the Mary Frances Houff Good Citizenship Award will be presented annually in her honor to an area high school student. Ms. Houff was an unlikely player on the Farm Bureau scene w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

6 Celebrate President's Day by planting an historic tree Presidents' Day, the federal holiday on Feb. 15, provides an occasion to consider some of America's history. It is also a good time to evaluate your home and community landscapes and plan to plant trees. By supporting a new, nationwide tree planting program, it is possible to directly connect your national heritage with your horticultural and environmental efforts. Famous & Historic Trees is a treeplanting project and educational program of the American Forestry Association. AFA is the nation's oldest nonprofit citizens' conservation organization. The group's missions are to improve the environment by planting and caring for trees and forests, and to educate people on the importance of trees and forests. The Famous & Historic Trees project takes a unique tack on the trees it raises and promotes. The program staff collects and plants seeds from trees that bear relevance to America's historic and cultural...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

February 1993 Public's acccptsncc of biotechnology key to its success By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Edtor ANAHEIM, Calif.—Consumer acceptance of biotechnology is the key to its success. ' 'There's been a lot of investment in biotechnology and the stakes are very, very high," Dr. Thomas J. Hoban, associate professor and Extension sociology specialist at North Carolina State University, told a group of American Farm Bureau Federation annual meeting attendees. "It's our feeling that there's a great need for (public) education." 4 'The bulk of the population has no idea where their food comes from," added Dr. Susan Harlander, director of dairy foods research and development for Land O'Lakes Inc. "Without understanding the basics of agriculture, it will be a challenge for the public to understand biotechnology." It's important that the public accepts biotechnology and genetically engineered food products because they can significantly change America's food supply, the speakers emphasiz...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

8 Insurance fraud creates problems Qs How serious a problem is insurance fraud? A: Although we don't have exact figures at this time, the property and casualty insurance industry as a general rule estimates that around 10 percent of the claims it receives are fraudulent. The National Insurance Crime Bureau estimates that fraud costs insurance companies and their customers around $18 billion a year. Q: Can't insurance companies recognize fraudulent claims and refuse to pay them? A: The insurance industry has been fighting fraud for years, and is doing more all the time. We are improving the training of our adjusters by putting more emphasis on detecting fraud. We have developed fraud indicators that can be "red flags" for fraud. Some of those indicators are having three or more Wilder reaffirms commitment to farm trade RICHMOND —Gov. L. Douglas Wilder reaffirmed his commitment to form trade in Virginia Jan. 14, and said his legislative proposal to offer incentive tax credits also ext...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

February 1993 Continuing progress Construction on the new Virginia Farm Bureau buicflng in Goochland County continues, in this photo, taken in December, the roof had been put on and some of the wals were going up. This sign (inset) sits at the entrance to the new buicflng site to let visitors know what's taking place. (Photos by Greg Hfcfca) USDA office closings could affect some Virginia farmers WASHINGTON —Under the former Republican administration, 52 Virginia county offices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture could have been closed over the next two years, but the new Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy wants to cut costs from the top before closing hundreds of field offices across the country. Espy's predecessor Edward Madigan has proposed shutting down or merging 1,200 USDA field offices nationwide in order to streamline the agriculture department. He said the closings would reduce multiple offices in the same localities and save taxpayers money. The net result, Madigan said,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

10 DODGE JUST CAME UP WITH 500 MORE REASONS FOR BELONGING TO YMIR BUREAU. FARM BUREAU NEWS February 1993

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

February 1993 USDA tells Americans to eat more—grains and legumes It's rare to have someone tell you that you need to eat more. The someone in this case is the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, along with a bevy of health experts across the nation. The new Food Guide Pyramid, which you NewWellness Jeanine M. Sherry, M.S..R.D. President, NewWelness Inc. read about in an earlier issue of the Farm Bureau News, encourages Americans —in no uncertain terms —to eat more grains and legumes. The problem is, many of us aren't sure how to best fit more of these high carbohydrate, fiber-packed super foods into our diet. VGfell, read on—l'm going to give you plenty of practical tips for increasing your intake of grains and legumes. The old myth—that complex carbohydrates or starchy foods such as breads, cereals, pasta and beans are fattening—has been dispelled. We know that gram for gram, carbohydrates (4 calories per gram) offer less than half the calories of fat (9 calories...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

12 Healthcare . _ - - • M.iny ;nc iim lotujcr ,itiK■ It > , iijunl mi:(iii ii mimit-m-... tji .-c, iu-,- - of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums Does Your I Blue Cross and Blue Shield 1 Your Current Policy Provide? I of VfcgHa Coverage Policy Coverage $5,000,000 Medical Coverage? I ! -y , , Our plan provides up to $5,000,000 ■ in lifetime benefits for covered services. ■ | An Annual Out of Pocket Limit I YJijfl The Maximum you will personaHy pay toward covered services I in any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, (for option I) I — _J L Dental Coverage Included Coverage for restorative and preventative dentistry. | Wr j ■ Prescription Drug Card 1 i I Just show your card at participating pharmacies for I Br immediate coverage. I 1 „ — Supplemental Accident Benefits I V%jf\ Addition...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

February 1993 |k* B. r T1 Helpful hobnobbing Above, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation board member Spottswood Taßaferro (I) chats with Sen. Frank Noien, DAugusta County, Jan. 20 during the VFBF Farm-City Legislative Reception, sponsored by the Farm Bureau's Women's Committee. (Photo by Grag Kicks) To the right, Mklwest District Women's Chairman Janet Mttchel dishes out strawberry mUk punch to Del. Wilard Finney, D-Frankln COUnty. (Photo by Kalhy Diwn) The reception is held annualy to give Farm Bureau board members and department heads the opportunity to dscuss their concerns or just get to know their legislators and other state officials. r\ Spring Savings from SAFEMARK! $50 SAVINGS . Biiy 2 radial rear farm tires or 2 of the following bias farm tires and receive a $50 U.S. Savings Bond. Ayli u \ \ Limit one savings bond per customer. See your local Farm Bureau Safemark dealer for details. I \ Yl S* sV 1 Safemark Long/Bar Short/Bar Mufti Angle Long Bar/Short Bar II til 1 \ I . Multi A...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

14 SEVEN PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS ready for service (18 mo.). Bred and open purebred Charoiais heifers. 703-592-3323-36 BRED HEFERS. Some registered Angus to calve in March. Cal 804-848-0704. REGISTERED PCX I FT) HEREFORD BULLS with excelent btoodfcnes and good E.P.D.s. 703-382-2050. REGISTERED ANGUS—yearling buls and performancebred females. Franklin County. 703-576-2809 evenings. REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS buls—sl,ooo and up. Also registered black Angus cows with calf, $1500 and up. Phone 804-792-9022, day, 804-793-7002, evenings. PERFORMANCE TESTED ANGUS BULLS—Tye Brook Angus. Paul Saunders & Sons., Farm, 804-277-5455, Jim, 804-277-9133. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN BULLS—service age. Also open and bred heifers. 703-825-0590. BULLS —Registered Angus, various ages. For rent or sale. Grapendge Farm, Goochland, VA. 23063. FOR SALE—Jersey cow fresh in March 1993. Cana, VA. Phone 703-755-4286. WANTED—Downed or crippled cattle. 804-352-5846 or 804-352-7352. REGISTERED ANGUS—S he...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

February 1993 Farmers Market (Continued from Page 14) WANTED—GIass cylinder visible gasoline pump in restorable condition by serious non-dealer individual. 703-962-1067. WANTED—Gbson, Fender, Martin, Gretsch, Rckenbacker, Danetedro, Moserite or any other quafty name brand guitars, bass guitars, mandoins, banjos and amps. Paying top dolar cash. Espectaly wanted are models buit before 1975, but al considered. Premium prices paid for Fender Stratocasters and Tetecasters made in the 50s and 60s, and Gbson Les Paul models made in the 50s. If you have any of the above and they are for sale cal 703-382-4027 or write Karry East, 385 langlewood Drive, Christiansburg, VA. 24073 ENVIRONMENTAL SENSITIVE LOGGlNG—Balanced uneven aged management through single tree selection. Draft horse skidded. 703-651-6355. GREAT FOR HOUSEWIVES—Want to save and make money? Cal 1-800-484-7517, ext. 1357. WEDDING RECEPTION PUNCH recipe. S.A.S.E., $2, Coins, PO.B. 365, Tasley, VA. 23441. PLASTIC POTS sightly used,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

L95e5 p ! u ! 6j ' a 'P uoLju M^!a xoa Od 133J1S 3Dej D IS3A\ 003 ■TTTT—py-y7| Auedui<o 33uejnsu| Aimuuy neajng uuej yjai^nos 1 1 [* || L l l a3uejnsu| ajn nvajng uuej ujatjinos ■ 3Duejnsu| sj»m*S *M®3 K Al 1 k r Aueduico »3usjnsu| |eninw neajng uuvj v;ujSjiA S^SmmSmSSSSSSSS S3OIAJ3S pue S3}ey /. An i s t neajng uuej 9jeduioy VCO V'oOL \vUo/ 3d n • • oinv *e M stn^SmdpH - il t a !l* J i 2 S-S It' 0 "3 3 1 4_i Co 1 Hi to *> i §o *-» *,* % I i.r|r 8 tlsgS" b al3 |51 i «!s«* S S «> t* s 5 J nils 2 r® BQC 5! 10 e ! 11l CO . I} 4 I lflj I mil INSIDE

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1993

■■ wSm ■ JHHH |Hhß «H| JHL JH jßHHtap J/L I W/tKrWRF mmmr IRHHRI Vol. 52, No. 2 The photo to the right shows a close-up view of mature, berry-bearing EngKsh holy. Below, J. Stuart Nelson explains that it takes about six years tor a rooted cutting to grow to its mature height of six feet or more. (Photos by Kathy Dixon) , I t)il i> ifl Jl Wi\ ■ •^43H®'JQMSw#Caiß6tw*sZsE*^^^H^KB i $ \/■ -li \ m , ■ Kk | ' 11/, r * 1 ; 3 a i»^3ES&K^K£3i^B^^IIH^HIfIK & ? jte,t\ English holly may be newest form of alternative agriculture By KATHY DIXON Rum Bureau News Edtor REEDVILLE—EngIish holly is cropping up as the newest alternative agriculture for Virginia farmers. Not much is known about English holly orcharding or the potential markets. But there is at least one Viiginian who thinks it's a great opportunity for farmers and other landowners who want to make some money without too much effort. ' 'Growing holly doesn't take much mote work than mowing a lawn,'' said...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1993

2 Leadership conference prepares county leaders for lobbying efforts This is always a special month for Virginia agriculture. March 14-20 is National Agriculture Week, farmers are busy with spring planting, and Virginia Farm Bureau Federation volunteer leaders travel to the nation's capital to meet with their respective congressmen. As a final tuneup for the March 16-17 congressional trip, 45 volunteer leaders from around the state attended the American Farm Bureau Federation's National Leadership Conference via satellite in Richmond Feb. 4-5. Entitled "Strategies for Change," the well-polished program offered our members a better understanding of the national issues farmers face today. And it helped them better formulate strategies for influencing national legislation that affects their livelihoods. This is the type of action planning Farm Bureau should continue to emphasize. It's what Farm Bureau is all about. The leadership conference gave our participants some practical, applica...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1993

March 1993 Holy can help cfvetsify 0 W 0 (Continued from Page 1) Spencer Neate, Virginia Farm Bureau's assistant director of the Commodities/ Marketing Department, agrees with Leggett. "Vtfe support any form of agriculture that benefits the farmer,'' Neale said "But the market needs to be studied before anyone jumps into it." English holly investigated Stuart says he's studied the marketboth for growing and selling the perennial plant—and has found nothing but a bright outlook for those who take a chance on English holly orcharding. "If a farmer doesn't set aside 10 acres and plant English holly, he's a fool,'' Stuart said. From his experiences in the Holly Society, he has found that there's an established industry on the West Coast, but nothing in the East. He studied what was done in Oregon and deckled that the Tidewater area was suitable for growing English holly. Holly orcharding is profitable Stuart planted English holly from Oregon at Towles Point in Lancaster County in 1952 a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1993

4 March 7-9: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation State Women's Committee Conference. Contact Sandy Bennett, 804-225-7544. March 9-11: Implementing Integrated Environmental Management Workshop, Virginia Tech. Contact John Cairns, 703-231-5538. March 10: Virginia Council of Farmer Cooperatives, Graves Mountain Lodge, Syria. Contact R.V. Rice, 804-281-1452. March 10-11: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Livestock and Dairy Commodity meetings, Ramada Inn, Lexington. Contact Spencer Neale, 804-225-7508. March 12-14: International Symposium on Red Bordeaux Varieties, Omni Center, Charlottesville. Contact Katherine Martin, 804-353-8699. March 13s Forage and Horse Nutrition Conference, Abingdon. Contact Philip Blevins, Virginia Cooperative Extension, 703-628-2161. March 13: Open Horse Forum, Harrisonburg. $12 w/ lunch. Call the Rockingham County Extension office, 703-564-3080. March 13-14: Highland County Maple Festival, Monterey. March 14-20: National Agriculture Week. Call your local Cooperativ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1993

March 1993 Moderate caffeine intake is considered safe for most adults Coffee and tea are among the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. Coffee intake began about 1000 A.D., while tea came into use even earlier— approximately 350 A.D. in China. Coffee and tea aren't the only sources of caffeine, however. Cocoa, chocolate, soft drinks, headache remedies and diet pills also contain significant amounts. Caffeine, actually considered a drug, is one of a compounds called methylxanthines, which act directly to stimulate the central nervous system, with effects throughout the body Depending on how much you consume, it can temporarily boost your metabolism, heart rate and mood; increase stomach-acid secretion and urine production; and constrict some blood vessels while dilating others. It also improves alertness while warding off drowsiness and fatigue. Some of these side effects are desirable at times. A short-term improvement in intellectual activity may be just what you need to...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1993

6 Farm safety one of Women's top priorities One of the issues of the 1993 Women's Program of Work is farm safety. Just recently, a 3-year-old child in my county died as the result of a farm accident. It breaks my heart to think such an accident might have been prevented. As difficult as it might be, we need to heed the advice: "Just say no," when our children and grandchildren beg to ride, or play on farm equipment. They need to be kept out of work areas and fields for their own safety and our peace of mind. It would also be helpful to know first aid, including CPR, and have a fully equipped first aid kit at your home and shop. First aid kits could also be kept at remote work sites, on tractors, combines and trucks. The National Safety Council advises those of us who employ workers to provide personal protective equipment, such as safety goggles, face masks, respirators and hearing protectors for jobs that require extra precaution. The equipment should be properly fitted for the wor...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x