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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FARMING MISCELLANY [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

FARMING MISCELLANY

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
MANURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

MANURES. (Prize Essay of 111. Agl Soc.for 1870.) BY It. OXDDXNGB, ROCKTOBD ILLINOIS. Engaged, as we have boon, in the business of market gardening and seed growing, we long since learned that our net annual income can almost certainly be predicted from the amount of manure secured Knowing so well its importance we have naturally been led to make it the subject of some" thought, and not a few experiments, the practical results of which wo shall seek to embody in this paper. Wo shall make no effort to discourse learnedly upon theories, or the teachings of the books but rather to tell simply and briefly the methods we rind most profitable in saving, manufacturing and applying manures. From the moment we come into possession of it we find the chief difficulty with manure, as with riches, is to keep it. Il our fields be idle and free from frost, we can at once put it under the surface. l>ui this is possible for only a small portion ol the year, and often a long time it must li...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Eagle Hay Press. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

The Eagle Hay Press. We give herewith a representation of what is claimed to be the most efficient hay press ever introduced to the notice of the public. It is known as the "Eagle Hay Press,'" theinvention of J. A. McGillivral, of Illinois, by whom it was patented in ISC.."). Its large sale in the Eastern States has induced the proprietors to introduce it into California and the Pacific States. The power is applied by means of two levers, arranged in such a manner that its application increases in ratio to the resistance, as the levers approach a horizontal position. It is not only a powerful press, but it is simple and not liable to easily get out of order; hence it can be afforded cheap. It is said that three men, with one horse can bale from 10 to 15 tons of hay per day, each bale weighing from 250 to .'SOO pounds. It is also well adapted for pressing hides, rags, wool or cotton. When a bah 1 is pressed and fastened, the follower runs down of its own weight, and the bale can be t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Gopher Trap. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Gopher Trap. Wo have previously spoken of a simple and effective trap, invented by Mr. 1). N. Phelps, of San Leandro, and patented through the Scientific Pkess Patent Agency. We now give a small cut show- ing the construction in which one or two improvements have been made. The trap consists of a stout wire, bent so as to form a spring trap as shown in the drawing. It is sprung by pressure against a broad sheetiron trigger. The dotted lines show the trap when sprung. It has boon tried in a large number of cases with great success. The trap is made of different sizes, and by a slight change in the adjustment of the trigger, can be used for catching rats. It is, indeed, used for various " small deer," squirrels, rabbits, skunks, badgers, coons, foxes, coyotes, etc., etc. Its effectiveness recommends it highly to our farmers. It is manufactured by Mr. Phelps, who may be addressed as above. A White-winged Txal Duck was lately killed in Yolo county, and is now on exhibition, stuffed, at ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PATENTS AND INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

PATENTS AND INVENTIONS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. (From Official Reports to DEWEY * CO., I. 8. and Foukiun Patent AOEHTi, AM) PUBUIHKBi OK TIIK scientific PBXM.] For the Week Ending March 14th. Potato Masher. —Charles Adolph Frederick, San Francisco, Gal. Medical Compound for Treating Bronchial and Lino Diseases. — Shelby Wadan Holm, Bachalor Valley, assignor to Britton Capell and Win, J. Rose, Little Lake Valley, Cal. Boot-Jack.— Joseph Rouard, San Francisco, Call Machine fob Blocking Ribbons, Etc.— George Vincent, Stockton, Cal. Molding Machine.James H. Culver, San Francisco, Cal. Hair Restorative.— P. Thomas and Joseph F. Boardman, Elko, Nevada. Saw.—William Kidd, Duncan's Mills, Cal. Note.—Copies of V. 8. ami Foreign Patent! furnished by Dkwky & Co., in the shortlist time possible (by telegraph or otherwiw) at the lowt'Ht rates. All patent buHinesH for Pacific coast Inventors tmnuctsd with greater security and In much less time than by any other agency.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notices of Recent Patents. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Notices of Recent Patents. Pen-Holpkh.— J. Both, Virginia City, Nevada. Although the pen, as acknowledged by the general public, is mightier than the sword, notwithstanding its inferior size, yet it has not been subject to as much attention with regard to the facility of carrying it on the person. Mr. Both proposes, by his invention, to enable every one to have this powerful weapon always ready to the hand. For this purpose, he simply modifies its construction, obviating the necessity of having a more or less cumbersome case. He so constructs tin 1 metallic pen-clasp that it can be hinged to tin 1 end of the handle or stock of the pen, which, consequently, oan be shut down upon the handle. A metallic ferrule is arranged to slide up and down along the handle, and serves to stay the pen and clasp it firmly in place when open for use, as well as to slip over and protect its point when it is closed down on its handle. The device being so handy, it is feared that editorial combats will b...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. Sheep-Shearing:, Etc., in Fresno.—The Expositor of the 15th instant says: The sheep-shearin< season for the spring clip has begun. The clip will, on account of the increased number of sheep in the county, be fully one-fourth, if not a half larger than last season. The cattle trade will not, we think, be as good as usual, on account of the severe drought which has prevailed in a portion of the county, and the further fact that the pasture lands are over-stocked with sheep and cattle, and consequently stock is not in as good condition as usual at this Beaton of the year. Our fanners are expecting to realize good crops this season. If ruins only follow to sustain tin; growth of vegetation, we think their hopes will be fully realized. Taking everything into consideration, we may anticipate a reasonably prosperous season. AlsikeClover Experiment.— The Stockton Independent has received a package of Alsike clover, which has been handed to Mr. Armi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AN OREGON POTATO—THE DIMICK. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

AN OREGON POTATO—THE DIMICK. Mr. David Newsome, an experienced agriculturist of Oregon, recommends through the Willamette Farmer, the "Dimick," or as, is sometimes called the "Savage Potato," as one of the very best varieties to cultivate, and superior to the far-famed "Early Rose." Mr. N. writes as follows:— "I know it is a difficult matter to place any one variety of the potato above all others, and contend for its sujjeriority. There are over fifty varieties of the potato cultivated in the United States, and perhaps half of them are unworthy of attention. Perhaps half of the remainder may have some good qualities, and be worthy, in some localities, of considerable attention. Some of the best fourth part be very early in bearing, and hence pr Stable for early marketing. Some may be very prolific and hardy, and may do well on thin lands, and shift well with weeds and poor culture. But the farmers and gardeners of Oregon need some one variety of potato, that combines, as nearly as p...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Arboriculture in California. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Arboriculture in California. [Written for the Pbess.] With a Glance at the Writer's Experience with Trees. The cultivation and care of trees has been a passion, bordering on a mania, with us, since our earliest boyhood days. Born in the woods, nurtured in a primitive log cabin, in a scant "opening" in the primeval forests of Central New York, where the lofty elm, the stately pine, the majestic and beauteous maple,the pyramidal balsam, fir, and the elegant magnolia and their multitudinous forest companions, threv. welcome shades and scattered their fragrant blossoms far and near; wo seemed to have been inspired with these grand old forest scenes with the spirit of the woods, with those magnificent sylvan beauties, from our very infancy. To plant and protect the trees, whether fruit or forest, has been with us an almost religious duty, for the half century since we were of sufficient age to commence our joyous mission. "Woodman, spare that tree," has been to us a sacred talisman. And,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
UP COUNTRY LETTERS.-NO. 6. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

UP COUNTRY LETTERS.-NO. 6. JEWELL [Written for the Phksb.] Dear Reader. —Nell and I have mtule a discovery. Amelia is in love ! This is how it happened. About half a mile from the farm-house there is a charming little spot I have named "Dingly Dell." A huge pile of rooks, with overhanging trees and clinging vines forms our cave. A clear, babbling brook, tumbling carelessly among and over big stones, comes dashing down a miniature precipice just here, which awakens echoes and makes the "Dell" a spot of rare beauty. I have noticed, of |late, Amelia's prolonged absence from home, her deepened color, brilliant eye, lightness of step and heightening beauty without comment or thought until now. In my quiet walks and rambles Nell is often my companion, unless needed at home. To-day we sauntered to the "Dell;" the noise of the brook quite overpowering our voices and foot* step*, until lifting aside the vines to enter the cave, we started at finding the place already occupied. A young man, p...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A New Fire Escape. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

A New Fire Escape. Editors Pkesb:—We—that is, our little family—are much pleased with your paper, the more as it takes in such a wide scope of information, so much wider than its title, and the usages of agricultural papers, would lead us to expect. My husband, a retired physician, is so much engaged with his horticultural pursuits, that ho cannot now find time to write, to contribute his dues to the general stock of knowledge, in return for the much valuablo information received through your journal. Although the grand object of your paper is to furnish knowledge, whereby to promote the means of sustaining and rendering ! pleasant human life, yet anything that may be calculated to aid in its preservation, I am satisiied will be acceptable to your renders. A few months since, I was much shocked by the account of the destruction of the Spotswood House at Richmond, Va., and the sad and unnecessary loss of life at that i disaster. You will remember that egress by the stair-ways was cut...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Chemistry and its Applications. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Chemistry and its Applications. rProf Ezra 8. Cabu baton the Mechanic Arts Col UMI, M<>el.anicH' Institute Hall, 8. F. Rtporte exim>HHly for the Press.J Earth and Man. Owing to some niis-connection the apparatus for the usual chemical lecture was not in readiness on Saturday evening, and Prof. Carr accordingly treated the students and visitors to an original written lecture on Earth and Man—to use Guyot's brief and expressive title for that broad and rich field,— though neither the title nor the matter of the Professor's lecture was from Guyot or any other one author. Man was in the beginning commanded to subdue the earth. He has learned very many of Nature's great ilaws, like that of the eclipses. A wise conception of the ancients considered him as a microcosm, and he was indeed the true Jacob's ladder on which the angels ascend and descend' — the Lord at the top and the earth at the foot; man intercommunicating with and benefiting from all. „ Clima...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Steam-Power vs. Electricity. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Steam-Power vs. Electricity. Prof. Morton, of the Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J., gives in a New York paper the following statement of the relative economy of steam and electricity for motive power:— "The doctrine of conservation of force (now as well established as that of gravitation) teaches us that a certain maximum of force can be developed by the use of a given quantity of any material —as, for example, coal in a steam engine, or zinc in a galvanic battery—which may be more or less completely utilized, but cannot be exceeded. Thus, a pound of coal burned in one minute, if applied without any loss whatever, would develop 332 horse-power tor that time; as applied in practice in our ordinary engines, it develops but about 12 horse-power, all the rest being lost. We see here what a margin for improvement exists. We are getting but from tlu-ee to five per cent, of the 'good' out of our fuel, and we might suppose that some other way of developing force, if less wasteful, might be...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Catarrh. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

Catarrh. [Written for the Phess.]| As much of the general information upon this subject has been furnished by the "patent medicine man," some errors are generally entertained which public "welfare dictates should be corrected. What It Is. Catarrh, from the two Greek words krtta, down, and rein, to flow, is the name given to a mucous discharge from the nose, head and throat. Any mucous membrane may become diseased, so that it will secrete and discharge an unusual amount of mucous, consequently we have nasal and bronchial catarrh, ophthalmic catarrh, leucorrhoea catarrh of the stomach, intestines, bladder, etc. Catarrh of every form may be either acute or chronic, according to the length of time, since its invasion, and the changes which have taken place in the mucous surfaces. There are also some forms of specific catarrh, communicated by contact, but they need not necessarily be described at this time. It will, however, be understood that any unusual flow of mucous, from any mucous ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. Onr farm fronts this week on the sea-coast, and from the entrance we see a busy scene of stout-hearted men Launching the Life Boat in their brave endeavor to save the lives of fellow beings. But we see this scene by looking though one of the windows of Prang's Art Establishment, and we learn at the same time thereby How C'hromos are Made. We turn for a moment from this view to see what lias been done for the farmer in the way of Mechanical and Scientific Progress, but on leaving the refreshing coolness of the library see another tragedy, that of the Snow-Bound Starved Emigrants of '•!•>, which is pat in B different light from that in which we previously viewed it. Another turn and we come upon something infinitely less exciting although practically no less interesting,—a Manure Heap. By the side of the heap is a Hay Press, and near at hand are other valuable Inventions. All these are capable of being turned to profitable account. The Agricultural Notes of...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC SUGAR CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 1 April 1871

DOMESTIC SUGAR CULTURE. Though the Alvarado Sugarie has proved so successful, and some movements are recorded at Sacramento and San Jose, nothing seems likely to be done this year, beyond Alvarado, except raising beets for next year's seeding. We regret to learn that Mr. "Wadsworth's efforts to secure the subscription of a capital of S2"),000 for putting up works to make sugar from watermelons have thus far been unsuccessful; but it is not yet too late to initiate the enterprise. The undertaking has no risk, because if only syrup be made, its delicious flavor will secure an eager market, as in Italy. It requires only very simple works, such as can be put up in two months; and by additions, beets can be added next year, for the sugar of each is alike when refined. There is very great economy in the co-working of beets and melons. Between thorn the sugarie can be kept in work the year round; and melon refuse makes a palatable variation in the feed of stock. Beets give no syrup for fam...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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