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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
BULLETS, BOATS, AND BALLOONS. ODD THINGS ANIMALS MAKE AND USE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

BULLETS, BOATS, AND BALLOONS.   ODD THINGS ANIMALS MAKE AND   USE. Spiders often fall on the decks of ships miles   out at sea. They belong to a species that have   the power of emitting a line of silk so light that it floats in the air. When a breeze comes, the   insect crawls to the top of the grass blade,   spins her floating web, and away she sails. Not only do spiders thoroughly understand   how to make the wind assist them, but they also   know how to counteract the injurious effect of a heavy storm. A spider has been watched   hanging to the bottom of her net a piece of   stick, three inches long and as thick as a pencil,   to save it from being blown away.   The common English gnat builds a boat out of her eggs, and uses air bubbles to float it. You   may push this tiny craft under water with your &nb...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BASHFUL LOVER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A BASHFUL LOVER.   "Young man," said the mother of the family, confronting him in the parlor, "you have been coming to see my daughter for more than a year. Have you any reason to think she would ever ac- cept you as a lover?" "Why, I will confess to you, Mrs. Glasspy," responded the youth, meeting her stern gaze with the fearlessness of conscious rectitude, "that when she wrapped her arms around my neck last night, and kissed me, I was almost emboldened to speak out."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DRY WASHING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

DRY WASHING.   It is a familiar boast of English people that   we are above all others a washing nation, says   the "Lancet." Soap-and-water is a standing dish   in Great Britain, but so little were we disposed   to credit the habitual cleanliness of foreigners   that a piece of soap in the valise was till recently   the habitual companion of an Englishman on his   travels.   Nowadays such an item is scarcely a necessary   part at the traveller's impedimenta, though there   are still fair-sized hotels on the Continent where   soap may be searched for in vain in the bedrooms,   while the smallest inn in this country would   blush to the roof at such a deficiency. All kinds   of theories have been raised to account for this   national tendency to ablution, and most diverse &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ENGLAND SHOULD HAVE MORE Ms.P. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

ENGLAND SHOULD HAVE MORE Ms.P.   —♦— Briefly put, if representation were made pro- portionate to population, Ireland would have thirty-one fewer members, and Scotland three fewer than at present, and England thirty-four more. The representation of Wales is precisely what it should be. On the average, Ireland has one member for every 7144 voters, Scotland one for every 9678, and England one for every 10,897. The average English member represents 10,897 voters. But there are in England and Wales no fewer than twenty-nine constituencies of less than 5000 each, and there are sixty-six with more than 15,000 each. The Romford division of Es- sex has one member for 33,556 electors, and the borough of Durham has one member and only 2632 electors. Again, the largest six constituen- cies in the kingdom have an aggregate of more than 150,000 electors, and the smallest forty five have an aggregate of less than 150,000. So one set of 150,000 electors have only six, while another set...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOUND HER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

FOUND HER.   "I'm looking for my wife," he said, As by her side he tarried. "Your wife," she cried, "I didn't know, Nor dream, that you were married." "Who said I was? Not I, indeed; But won't you end my search?" And then, of course, she saw the point (It's going to be in church). —"Philadelphia Bulletin."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OLDEST ENGLISH DOCTOR DEAD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

OLDEST ENGLISH DOCTOR DEAD.   A gentleman, believed to be the oldest member of the medical profession in England, has just died at Monkseaton, Northumberland, in the person of Dr. John Warren Edgar. The deceased gentleman was born in September, 1803, and had therefore lived to the remarkable age of 98 years, most of which were spent in practice in Kirby Stephen, Westmoreland. He took his de- gree is 1828, and continued in practice until a few years ago. Dr. Edgar came of a long-lived family, an elder brother, Dr. Robert Edgar, reach- ing 94 years; Dr. Paul Edgar died at 93, while a third, Dr. Thomas Edgar, lived till he was 80.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SO WOMEN "MAKE TRADE." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

  SO WOMEN "MAKE TRADE."   Nine commercial travellers for lace; eight for dresses and prints; six for feathers, flowers, and straws; six for mantles; five for trimmings and umbrellas; five for ribbons; four for gloves and hosiery; three skirts and underclothing; three "general;" two silks and velvets; two flannels; one cloths; one calicoes; and one haberdashery— 66 travellers in all (23 "town" and 33 "country"), form the autumn staff "on the road" of one alone of London's big wholesale drapery establish- ments.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN MILITARY "HONOR." AN OFFICER DRIVEN TO DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

GERMAN MILITARY "HONOR." AN OFFICER DRIVEN TO DEATH. A young officer of the East Prussian garrison   of Insterburg, named Kurt Blaskowitz, the son of a village pastor, has fallen a victim to the insti- tution of duelling in singularly sad circum- stances. He had invited his comrades to a farewell bachelor symposium on the eve of his marriage, and, although he had not lost command of him- self when he parted from them, it would appear that on his way home he was overcome by the effects of wine. In this condition he was found   by two artillery officers of the garrison, who   volunteered to help him home to his lodging. Lieutenant Blaskowitz, who by this time was in a state which rendered him entirely irrespon-   sible for his actions, appears to have offered   some show of violence to his two benefactors,   with the result that they arrived at the conclu-   sion that he had seriously insulted t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OYSTER SALAD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

OYSTER SALAD. To make oyster salad, take one quart of oysters, one head of celery, one-third of a teaspoonful of mayonnaise dressing, three tablespoonsful of vinegar, one tablespoonful of oil, salt and pepper, and one tablespoonful of lemon juice. Let the oysters come to a boil in their own liquor, skim them well and drain them, then season them with the oil, salt, pepper, and vinegar, and add the lemon juice. When cold set them on ice, or in the ice chest. Scrape and wash the whitest, tenderest part of the celery, cut it in very thin slices, and put in the bowl with a large lump of ice or set it in the refrigerator until it is time to serve the salad. When the oysters are ready to serve, drain the celery and mix it with the oysters and half of the dressing. Arrange the dish, then pour the remainder of the dressing over it and garnish it with celery leaves.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN HISTORIC CHAPEL. WHERE BUNYAN PREACHED IN LONDON. SOON TO DISAPPEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

AN HISTORIC CHAPEL   —♦—   WHERE BUNYAN PREACHED IN LONDON. SOON TO DISAPPEAR. A building which connects us with John Bun-   yan and his times is being swept away by the   demolition of the famous Zoar Chapel, in King's-   court, Great Suffolk-street, Southwark, where the   author of the "Pilgrim's Progress" is said to have   occasionally preached.   Thus, one by one, the historic landmarks of   London are disappearing, and another link which   binds us to the past is about to be severed. Even   of the London that Dickens wrote about it may   be said that comparatively little of it remains   as it then was, so rapidly do architectural and   street improvements succeed one another nowa-   days.   HOW FEW REMAIN!   It is a thing of almost daily occurrence to read &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SCOTCHMAN'S VOYAGE. HOW JOHN BROWN REACHED MARSEILLES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE SCOTCHMAN'S VOYAGE.   HOW JOHN BROWN REACHED MARSEILLES. A Scotchman named John Brown was found   lying in a fainting condition in a small boat   in the harbor of Marseilles early in December.   The previous evening a small boat which had   come from the open sea was noticed moored at   the wharf on which the offices of the Board of   Health are situated. The solitary occupant ap-   peared to be unwell, and one of the board offered   his assistance. He refused, and was afterwards   seen to lie down in the boat, covering himself   with a rug. Subsequently one of the police   authorities also offered assistance, but the offer   was again declined. The following morning the   harbormaster noticed the boat drifting about   the dock. Putting out immediately in a launch   he overt...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANIMAL DRUNKARDS. NEED FOR A TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT AMONG BEASTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

ANIMAL DRUNKARDS. NEED FOR A TEMPERANCE MOVE- MENT AMONG BEASTS. A taste for strong drink is far commoner among animals than most people imagine. Indeed, the French Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has recently had a conference with a temperance society for the sole purpose of de- vising some method of saving their proteges from the disastrous effects of habitual intemperance. Professor Walsh, who has devoted a whole volume to an examination of these voiceless inebriates, declared that elephants, bears, goats, dogs, etc.. have the keenest possible taste for   liquors, and that monkeys can toss off a glass of beer like the most practised two-legged toper, while the whole lot of them would give their lives for a glass of eau-de-vie. Most people at one time or another have heard of dogs and cats that willingly sip saucers of beer apparently without suffering any after effect. And the deplorable condition of the pigs who made a full meal of the warm waste fr...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOULD PREVENTATIVE STOPPER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

MOULD PREVENTATIVE STOPPER. A glass stopper for preventing mould in syrups and other substances has been invented by a German pharmacist. It contains a chamber with   perforated bottom, into which is stuffed cotton   saturated with chloroform, and the vapor from   the chloroform prevents any fungus growth in   the bottle.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE GIRL AND THE GLOVES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE GIRL AND THE GLOVES. Naturally, he was a little surprised when the   school-girl, swinging her school-books in a   strap, stepped up to the counter and asked   him timidly if he kept gentlemen's gloves, size eight. But, he reflected, she was probably exe- cuting the commission for her father. As a matter of fact, she was merely filling in a little time between the end of school hours and the beginning of luncheon with the pastime which pleased her most—the pastime of making people feel mad. "Certainly," he said, with a patronising and encouraging smile. "What kind of gloves would you prefer, miss? Dogskin is being a good deal worn just now." "Thanks," she said. "I don't think I should like gloves which were made from the skin of poor little dogs. It seems so cruel." He smiled afresh. "That is merely a trade term," he said. "They are not really made from the skins of dogs." "I don't think," she said, "I want to buy gloves that are not what t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Complete Short Stories. AN ORDINARY EPISODE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

Complete Short Stories. AN ORDINARY EPISODE. It is a very old story. Nothing out of the ordi-   nary. But even the commonest, most everyday things sometimes have an honest pathos and   reality of their own, and so I tell their story   exactly as it happened. If it borders on the   tragic, nay, if it is tragic, don't blame me, for,   after all, the real, heart-breaking, killing tra-   gedies are enacted right in our midst (as theirs     was) and we every day carelessly brush by many   a quiet white face, bereft now of its first stony   despair, behind which—in the passionate heart   that throbs and grieves—is the tragedy of a   broken life.   But to go on with the story, which, I swear, is   true and faithfully recorded.   They met on board one of the best "ocean grey-   hounds."...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LILLIAN'S LOVER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

LILLIAN'S LOVER. "Must I really go, sweetheart?"   "Yes," replied Lillian M'Guire, placing her   shapely white hand in his, and looking into his   face with a tender earnestness that showed the   true womanliness of her nature: "it is better—far   better for both of us that we should part for   ever." And as she spoke the hot tears of pain   welled up into her beautiful brown eyes, and   with a little sob of pain Lillian's head was bowed   upon George's shoulder in an ecstacy of grief.   But George was not to be denied so easily.   "Cannot I have one hope?" he said.   Lillian lifted her head, and looked at him   steadily. She said, in cold Siberian tones, "Since   you will have it, under no circumstances can I   ever accept your proffered love, for I am a green-   grocer's daugh...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Did You Know This? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

Did You Know This? Tissue paper cleans and polishes any kind of glass. Some insects, while in the larval state, never sleep, but eat all the time. There are four sovereigns in circulation to one half-sovereign. Nothing is more promotive of health and de- structive of disease than continued sunshine. Of 35 warships built last year in Britain 18 only were for the British Government. For every 100 people who live in the country in the United Kingdom 258 live in towns. In London, 121 per 1000 of the deaths are from consumption; in Paris 170, and in Vienna 252. Men's wages in British factories average 25s a week, against 16s in Spain, and 15s in Italy. A proclamation has been issued at Pretoria prohibiting the establishment of betting houses in the Transvaal. Silver articles can be cleaned better, and will keep bright longer, when cleaned with lemon, than with any other preparation.   The monster Socialist petition against the German Customs Tariff Bill shows 3,431,784 sig- ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Books Worth Reading. OR TALKED ABOUT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

Books Worth Reading. OR TALKED ABOUT. Perhaps the most interesting book that came to hand by the last English mail, and is now on sale at the principal booksellers throughout Australia, is R. Barry O'Brien's "Life of Lord Russell of Killowen." Extracts from this im- portant and valuable work have already appeared in "The World's News." It is one of the most interesting biographies published for many a day. Another book on similar lines, and one likely to create a great deal of attention, is Stanley's "Life of Arnold," the headmaster of England's great public school at Rugby. All who have read "Tom Brown's Schooldays" will revel in the pages of this new work, which gives a keener insight into the life and motives of Dr. Arnold, who was beloved and revered by all who knew him. "Prosperous British India—a Revelation from Official Records," by Wm. Digby, C.I.E., throws the lurid light of criticism on the other side of the question. He starts out to show that that country and people are ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RAILWAY EXPERIMENTS: 100 MILES PER HOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

RAILWAY EXPERIMENTS: 100 MILES PER HOUR. Latest speed tests upon the German mili- tary railway between Berlin and Zossen show that a maximum of 100 miles an hour has been attained. The test is based on the records of automatic speed indicators, and it is said that neither the permanent way nor the equipment of the car have suffered. The greatest diffi- culty disclosed by such high speeds has been the air resistance, to overcome which motors capable of a nominal output of 1100 horse-power and a maximum of 3000 horse-power have been found necessary. The current is supplied by over- head wires.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
R. L. S.'S VIGOROUS ADVICE. INTERESTING LETTERS TO AN ARTIST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

R. L. S.'S VIGOROUS ADVICE.         INTERESTING LETTERS TO AN   ARTIST. Six hitherto unpublished letters of Robert   Louis Stevenson are printed in the November   "Harper's Magazine" by Mr. Horace Townsend.   They are addressed to Mr. Trevor Haddon, now a   well-known portrait-painter, who was at the   time at the beginning of his career.   In an undated letter, addressed from Heriot- row, Edinburgh, occurs the following character- istic passage:— "I quite believe that it is better to have everything brought before one in books. In that way the problems reach us when we are cool, and not warped by the sophistries of an in- stant passion. Life itself presents its problems with a terrible directness, and at the very hour when we are least able to judge calmly. Hence this Pisgah sight of all things off the top of a book is only a rational prepar...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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