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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. i 60 cree has forced the Florida Indian into the most desolate lands of the state. Where they once trod as master they now fear to place foot. We cannot be unmoved by the thought that here are the tattered and poverty stricken handfuls of a tribe of war riors that held at bay 21 strong government for half a century, a tribe that counted their cattle, their lands and their slaves in magnificent proportions. At the present time, to avoid com plications with the South Florida cattle herders, none of the race are permitted to own cattle. There is a certain pathos in the Indian's story of his rela tion to the white race, which arrests our attention and com pels sympathy. What of the future? Touch any point of the red man's history, where you will, or how you will, and the helpless savage always gets the worst of it. We judge the In dian too harshly. It is hard to give up old traditions, especial ly if the adherence to them means a life of ease. We are all in the purs...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

161 ' The Indian Advocate. have his way. The broken treaties of the past the Seminole has not forgotten. The old chiefs are as proud as the most imperious king. They regard these lands as their own, and cannot understand the government's claim. They say, "what right has the big white chief at Washington to give to us what is already ours the land of our fathers?" The white man who receives any confidence from the Florida Indian, must indeed possess great magnetism, for the Seminole is suspicious of every overture and will mislead his questioner on all occasions. And while the white man is studying "poor Lo," "pour Ln" is similarly engaged in studying him, and continually revolving in his suspicious mind, "what can the pale face want from the In dian any way?" The chiefs have taught the young braves all about the out rages perpetrated upon their tribe by unscrupulous agents dur ing the wars; and while the Indians themselves, in many ca ses, practiced cruelty, it was always in retalia...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 162 camp deserted. For, while the Seminole has regular settle ments, at various times during the year, the entire camp will assemble at some point where game is abundant and where a 'big hunt" will occupy a few weeks. Again syrup boiling will be the festival all will join in; at another time a large quantity of Koonti (wild cassava) will be made into flour. At ' these gatherings the tribe or families occupy temporary dwellings called lodges. The Indians in Florida number about 600. They live in tribes apart, each independent of the other, but in friendly re lation. The life of the Seminole has been without any aid or in struction from the white man. He has adopted a few of the implements,'' weapons and utensils of civilization; but in no other way has he imitated his pale faced brother. In the natu ral course of evolution he has made some progress he has not degenerated. Government reports show an annual appropriation of al most $7,000,000 for Indian service; ye...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

163 The Indian Advocate. aid from a government which they regard as having stolen from them the lands of their fathers. As the agent dwelt on the presents the red men of Florida should receive from the big whitfe chief, Tiger Tail, a worthy descendent of the invulnera ble Tustenuggee replied: "You came from Great Chief? You say Great Chief give Indian plow, wagon, hoe?" Then pointing in the direction of a small settlement of shiftless whites, he ad ded, "he poor man, give 'em to him. Indian no want 'em." Delivering his speech with the spirit of an old Norse King the chief strode majestically away, leaving the agent no nearer the fulfillment of his trust. We cannot but admire the proud and independent spirit of the Seminole as he refuses, in firm but Indian-like measures, the proffered liberality of a government which he believes has wronged him. And, from his high pinnacle of pride, he cer tainly bears the distinction of being the only American who has been found unwilling to share ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 164 while treachery may be a distinguishing feature of the Indian nature, yet the lowest one of them has some conception of honor when fairly approached. History shows that all through the Seminole war, misrepresentations and dishonorable schemes were practiced against them by the whites. Almost universal sympathy goes out to the remnant of a people who fought so bravely and so persistently for the land of their birth, for their homes, for the burial place of their kindred. As their traditions tell them of the oppression their people suffered as they wandered in the wilderness thrice forty years, who can tell the secret of their hearts? To do this, it would be neces sary to become, for the time, an Indian, to put ourselves in his place and what white man has ever done this? Ask the wa ters of Tohopeliga, or the winds that waft across Okeechobee. To the elements are whispered the heart throbs of these red fawns of the forest. The present Florida Indians are de sc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

1 65 The Indian Advocate. brave as the lion that roams the desert, with whom so many treaties have been wantonly broken, are driven farther and farther into the Everglades and their hunting grounds confisca ted to the land-grabbers. Is this justice?" To the Western Indians, under the protection of the gov ernment, and supplied in a large measure by the taxes which civilization pays, pages arc devoted by philanthropists for the betterment of their condition. The rights of the Seminoles of Florida should be defended. The day is not far distant when they must be made to go to the reservation in Arkansas or to bad lands set apart for them in Florida. To remove them from their tropical homes to the chilly blasts of the Indian Territory would be an act of cruelty and wholly unnecessary. They are certainly not foot-sore for the war path and are fearful of doing any thing to arouse the whites. "Indian no fight," is the answer to the questioner. They have sense enough to know that if war sho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 166 QUANAH PARKER'S CAREER. fWSAAAAAVNAAA CHIEF OF THE COMANCHF.S, WHOSE MOTHER WAS A. WHITE. A PROMINENT delegation of Indians, headed by the princi pal chiefs ot the Kiowa, Comanche and Apache tribes, have been in Washington for several days for the purpose of pro testing to the Great White Father against the allotment in sev eralty to the Indians and the sale of the residue to the white man, of their lands in Oklahoma Territory, in accordance with an act of Congress which became a law last spring. In the delegation is one of the greatest and most widely known Indian chiefs of recent years. He is Quanah Parker, chief of the Comanches, who form the aristocracy of the reservation. Starting out in life as the sworn and implacable enemy of the white men, he later became their fast friend and protector, and to-day stands as the arbitrator of all disputes between his people and the surrounding settlers. The influence which he exerts is remarkable, for Quanah is a ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

167 The Indian Advocate. ted with the Comanches with no civilized influences thrown around her, she was reared as much an aborigine as it was possible to change the white girl into the uncouth Indian. WEDDED A CHIEF. When the girl became marriageable she was taken as a wife by the then chief of the Comanches. Quanah Parker was an issue of that.union. Many years after her capture and mar riage, the Texas settlers made a raid into the Comanche country in retaliation for some mischief done by the redskins, and the white wife of the Comanche chief was recognized, captured and taken back to her people. She had been too long accustomed to the ways of the Indians to remain long with her relatives, and she soon effected her escape from her early home and went back to her Comanche husband. Again she was taken by the Texans in another raid on the Indians. This time she was kept under surveillance by her white relatives after being re moved to Texas, where she remained practically in captivity...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 168 COMANCHE REPRESENTATIVE. In all matters relating to the affairs of the government with the Comanches, Quanah Parker is always the chosen rep resentative of the Indians. Where he was the uncompromis ing foe of the Texas people, he has become the arbiter between his own people and his former sworn enemies. Not only is Quanah Parker chief of his tribe, but his word is also law with all the Comanches a law from which they know no appeal. For years, many Texans fed their herds in the Comanche reservation, sometimes under lease and often without any. It was profitable for the cattlemen to hire Quanah Parker to watch their interests and to see that their property did not suffer. From this and other sources, Quanah has accumula ted a large fortune, estimated at $200,000. "I stand as a fence between the Texans and the Coman ches," said Quanah to the writer, when speaking of his busi ness relations with the cattlemen. "When any of my people take cattle from the Texan ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

-- b - r $, w ' 'fT''' 7"'wiz "ir' - -" jp?5s:51Pipyp5iwwf?iFT y-TVQ?TK fi 169 The Indian Advocate. FACETIAE. After South Africa, China. When we get to the end of the Boer we nat- -urally meet the pig tail. "Why Daisy, what on earth ails you? Your tongue has been going like a bell-clapper for an hour." Why, we're playing house, mamma, and I'm you." i Teacher: "In the sentence 'Patrick beat John with his fists,' what is Patrick?" Bright boy: "He's Irish." "Was Rome founded by Romeo?" inquired a pupil of the teacher. "No my son," replied the wise man, "it was Juliet, who was found dead by Romeo." Mrs. Blanche: "I cannot see any callers to-day, Nanette." Nanette, five minutes later to caller: "Monsieur, I haf ze plaisure to in form you zat Madame is blind to-day." Judge: "You are charged with stealing chickens. Have you any wit nesses?" Prisoner: "I have not. I don't usually steal chickens before witnesses." "William is a sharp man," said Ben. "I should use the comparative de gree inst...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 170 1 f j The first candidate rose and said: ' 'I fought for you, my friends, and to-day, the bones of my right arm are bleaching among the hills of Africa. "The sec ond candidate followed with: "My leg, friends, lies listless in the shadows of Spion Kop!" "Both of my legs "said the third candidate," are in Maef king. Then the fourth man rose and said: "I went through the war without a scratch. Here are two strong arms to uphold your rights and two live legs to kick till you get 'em!" "Little boy, do you know your catechism?" Little boy: "Yes; but I want to tell you, Miss, that I ain't going to be no missionary and to be sent to China." Aunt Tecumseh (reading the police court news): "Well, well! there's one thing I'd never do. If I had fifty children, I'd never name one of them Alias. Seems as if they're sure to go wrong." "Do you believe in the transmigration of souls," asked Julius. "Yes," "Don't you," said Mac? Sometimes. "What do you suppose I was before I b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

171 The Indian Advocate. TJ3DE PRESS AjST OA.THOMO YOUTH". THE liberty of the Press is beyond dispute one of the most terrible weapons which the impious have devised against the Church of God. Books and magazines, pamphlets and newspapers, all are employed in disseminating the most per fidious calumnies against the Church and its followers. Day by day the poisoned venom siul's deeper and deeper into the hearts of the prejudiced or ignorant class, who think that every thing which is printed must be true and beyond discussion or deni al. "I believe," recently wrote an illustrious Spanish literateur, 1 believe that if the demon could return to earth in a manner after his own heart, he would choose to com'e'in the form of a "bad newspaper." "A bad book" writes another distinguished Catholic savant, "is the most powerful of weapons, the most bitter of enemies, the most cruel of assassins." It Ms said, we know not how truly, that Guttenbcrg once had a singular dream, in which he had a rev...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 172 may be a young man, the surprise and delight of his parents; he has respect for age and wisdom, in the joy of labor and a studious life. Perhaps it is a generous soul on whom God has particular designs. The hour of temptation and ruin has arrived. The perusal of this evil book throws him precipitately into the arms of vice. And the weapons of this corrupt press are so numer ous: spurious scientific works, writings against faith and re ligion, volumes upon volumes, which, if they do. not openly advocate immorality, portray it in the most seductive forms. Alas! what shall be said oi those persons of mature age who manifest indifference towards this foe, knocking daily at the door of every household in the land. Would that we all had the courage of oar convictions, like that monk in the monaste ry, who being invited to take the hand of Renan the apostate that blasphemed the divinity of Christ, exclaimed: "Never shall I touch the hand of the blasphemer of my God...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

173 The Indian Advocate. It behooves us then as parents, guardians, teachers and Catho lics, to stay as far as possible this destructive tide by patron izing good newspapers, magazines and reviews, and not failing to take in as great number as our purses will allow, standard Catholic publication, as well as to keep from the eyes and hands of our children and young people the daily papers, the best of which contain the most revolting details of infamous crimes. As for works professedly immoral and infidel in their tendency, no Catholic, worthy of the name, will give room in his library. In the matter of selection of good literature, especially as regards subscription to the current Catholic journals and maga zines, let us not leave it to our neighbor, but consider the sub ject solely in relation to ourselves. The fruits of our gener osity will sanctify our own souls and be productive of far reaching results to those committed to our charge, thus pro curing benediction for ourselves a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

" "prrj - W"k I"FTW The Indian Advocate. 174 BENEDICTINE NOTES. An event of great importance in the history of the Bene dictine Order, was the reopening of the Abbey of Ettal, near Oberammergau. The solemn opening took place, August 5th, the feast of the Transfiguration of Christ. The decrees from Rome restored to the monastery all its former privileges and nominated Rupert III, of Scheyern apostolic administrator of the Abbey. The execution of these privileges was intrusted to Hildebrand de Hemptine, the Abbot Primate of the Order. This prelate, in accordance with the power thus conferred upon him, canonically established the new foundation, ac cording to the Rule of St. Benedict. The reopening of Ettal again reminds us of the many Benedictine Abbeys that are still in the condition in which the avarice and irreligion of a government has placed them. Such places are especially numerous in Rhenish Prussia. Maria Laach, it is true, has been restored to its rightful owners. There are, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

175 The Indian Advocate. clothes of Our Lord, a particle of the Holy Cross of extraor dinary size, and the body of St. Cornelius, from whom the place derives its name. These relics, brought thither by the Benedictine monks, together with those of Aix-la-Chapelle are exposed and publicly venerated every seven years. In vain, however, do we look for those who built up the place. When will bigotry and prejudice cease and restore it to its primitive condition? Speaking of Rt. Rev. Boniface Krug, Abbot of Monte Casino, Italy", on the occasion of his visit to St. Benedict's Abbey, The Atchison Daily Globe says: "He is in high favor with Pope Leo, and is at the head of Monte Casino, the Abbey established by St. Benedict about the year 500, and over which St. Benedict himself presided as its first Abbot. The Church in connection is one of the grandest pieces of art in Europe. Abbot Krug also presides over a diocese, and has 220 priests under him. He was born in Germany, but came to America ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

The Indian Advocate. 176 LOCALS. The treaty with the Cherokee Indians was to remain good "while grass grows and water runs." The full-bloods claim that the treaty has been violated so often that they do not want any more. On November 8th, D. Vincent, O. S. B., and D. Hilde brand, O. S. B., pronounced their solemn vows. D. Aloysius, D. Stanislaus and D. Vincent, on Novem ber 10th, were made sub-Deacons, at the hands of Rt. Rev. Bishop Meerschaert. On November nth, the same gentlemen together with D. Maurus and Timothy received the deaconship. May all of them prove worthy to ascend higher still in the near future, and may they, then, bring forth fruits worthy of their sublime calling. The candidates and the community of Sacred Heart beg leave to acknowledge the kindnesses shown the ordinants by our Bishop, Rev. Fr. Germahus, the good Sisters and the congregation of Shawnee. "Honor cut Honor." The Advocate forgot to mention in its last issue the promotion of D. Hildebrand Zoeller, O. S...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

r!ST 177 The Indian Advocate. "wwKIPfjjmil'ti Died: On November 5th, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Crain, a prosperous merchant of Sacred Heart. May this little angel pray for her dear parents. Mr. Seek, of Shawnee, has purchased the premises of ' Mr. August Zoeller. After December 1st, the hotel and liv ery business will be run by Mr. Seek, and the patrons, we are sure, will be satisfied. life seems very cheap, just now, around the Mission. Since our last issue, three persons have been murdered in cold blood. Two Indians, and a young white man by the name of Nolan. Time was, when we were told that we lived in the wild Indian Territory, but never did the writer hear of any murder committed around Sacred Heart. Since, however, Yankee civilization has struck us, we hear of nothing but murder and robbery. Gambling hells and fire-water dives play sad havoc indeed. When will our "wise solons" deliver us from such evils? -A mass meeting of white persons, living in the Osage Indian r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

ffp"r vTfzfm$$$Ffm The Indian Advocate. 178 was on the premises the second week of November to study the situation so as to determine what additional legislation will be needed. The Hon. Gentleman hopes to get the appro priation through by the middle of January, but it may be late in February before the bill becomes a law. It will take a cou ple of weeks to put surveyors in the field and two months to make tho allotments. After that it will probably take "six weeks to approve the allotments. It is hoped the lands will be opened in June. "On time" is a good motto to have in Sacristies. When the congregation has assembled for 10 a. m. service, a 10:15 beginning is not conducive to piety. This is not meant for any one who loses his temper at a gentle hint. It is for the hum ble of heart who may "forget." 8AORED HEART POST OFFICE. , jt

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

179 The Indian Advocate. JOJE. VAAAVA All clay long, with a vacant stare, Along in the chilling winter air, With naked feet, he wanders slow Over the place the idiot Joe! I often marvel why he was born, A child of humanity thus forlorn, Unloved, unnoticed by all below; A cheerless thing is the life of Joe. Beauty can throw no spell o'er him; His inner vision is weak and dim, And nature in all her varied show Weareth no charm for the eyes of Joe. Earth may wake at the kiss of spring, Flowers may blossom and birds may sing; With joy the crystal streams may flow, They make never glad the heart of Joe. His vague and wandering thoughts enfold No dreams of glory, no schemes for gold; He knows not the blight of hopes, yet, oh! A blighted thing is the life of Joe! Who would not suffer the ills of life, Its numberless wrongs, its sin and strife; And willingly bear its weight and woe Rather than be the idiot Joe? I think of him in the silent night When every star seems a beacon-light To guide...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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