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Elephind.com contains 2,658 items from Tomahawk, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 19 April 1917

ONE of the first impressions the visitor receives when, he en ters California is the wide va riety of palms to be found ev erywhere. You see them in the gar dens of rich and poor, along the city streets and country lanes, in park con servatories, in private homes, in the theaters, the hotel lobbies, the shop windows. Your interest is aroused and then you begin asking questions. You soon get so that you can pick out the most popular varieties and then you learn their history and origin, forV palms from every section of the world grow in California. From a historical standpoint, the most unusual palm tree in the state stands at the foot of the Presidio Hill, In San Diego. It was planted by Father SFunipero Serra, who brought European civilization into California in 1769, and it is said that the only time the seedling bore fruit was in 1869, probably in honor of its one hundredth anniversary. For years, a group of these tall palms stood on this spot, much scarred and neglected. In Apri...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 19 April 1917

I* 5 1 if- Ji te, Grand Council Of American Indians. 4 AN ASSOCIATION ESTAB- LISHED FOR THE BETTER- xMENTOF INDIAN INTERESTS. All those who wish to join the Grand.Council of American In dians, recently organized at Wash ington, D. should apply to George Tinker, secretary, Paw hauska, Oklahoma, and enclose one dollar as a fee for a membership. Mr. Tinker will, upon application, .furnish full information to any person who may wish to join the association. Denninson Wheelock COUNSELLOR AT LAW and Solicitor in Chancery Interior Department Practice. Indian Law a Speciality. Address West De Pere, Wis. Frank 0. Beaulieu. ATTORNEY AT LAW. White Earth, Minn. D. B, Henderson Attorney at Law 915 Evans Bldg., Washington, D. 0. JOHN LEECY Notar Publi ipers drawn for conveying reservation lands WHITE EARTH, MINNESOTA Dr. Albert A. Campbell Physician and Surgeon Special attention given to dis eases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. Eyes tested. Glasses fitted OGEMA, MINN. Gall me by telephone day ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 19 April 1917

EV i i $ j 0) 0) Grand Council Of American Indians. AN ASSOCIATION ESTAB L1SHED FOR THE BETTER- MENT OF INDIAN INTKRFSTS. AH tho&e who wish to join the Grand.Oouncil of American In dians, recently organized at Wash ington, should apply to George Tinker, secretary, Paw hauska, Oklahoma, and enclose one dollar as a fee for a membership. Mr Tinker will, upon application, furnish full information to any person who may wish to join the association. Denninsofl Wlieelock COUNSELLOR AT LAW and Solicitor in Chancery Interior Department Practice Indian Law a Speciality Address West De Pere, Wis Frank 0. Beaulieu. ATTORNEY AT LAW. White Earth, Minn. D. B. Henderson Attorney at Law 915 Evans Bldg Washing-ton, D. C. JOHN LEECY Notary Public aner$ drawn ior conveying reservation lands WHITE EARTH, MINNESOTA Dr. Albert A. Campbell Physician and Surgeon Special attention given to ds eases of the Eve, Ear, Nose and Throat. Eyes tested. Glasses fitted OGEMA, MINN. Call me by telephone day or nigh...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

Vol. XV. Justice and Fair Dealing for every Indian who desires to become a good Citizen. THE TOMHAWK. (JUS H. BEAULIBU. Publishet White Earth Agency, Minnesota. Entered at the Postoffice at White Earth, Minn., as tnail matter of the second class. ^SUBSCRIPTION: $1.50 PER YEAR III AOVAICL CURTIS'' REORGANIZA- TION BILL. On the 10th of this month Sen. Curtis introduced in Congress a bill which proposes the reorgani zation of the Indian office at Wash ington. This bill is the most im portant legislation proposed since the passage of the General Allot ment Act, and will be watched with the utmost interest by the Indians in general. The bill is as follows: A BILL Creating a board for the manage ment of Indian Affairs, to provide for the classification of Indians, and for oth^r purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Con gress assembled. That there shall be in the Department of the In terior a board consisting of three member*,...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

"jjfc'n.ot.*" K: 1 lffn Vol. XV. l^k^& Justice and Fair Dealing for every Indian who desires to become a good Citizen. THE TOMHAWK. QUS H. BBAUL1BU. Publishei White Earth Agency, Minnesota, Entered at the Postoffice at White Earth, Minn., as mail matter of the second class. ^SUBSCRIPTION: S1.50PER TEAR III MIM Cl CURTIS' RE0R6ANIZA- OD the 10th of this month Sen. Curtis introduced in Congress a bill which proposes the reorgani zation of the Indian office at Wash ington. This bill is the most im portant legislation proposed since the passage of the General Allot ment Act, and will be watched with the utmost interest by the Indians in general. The bill is as follows: A BILL Creating a board for the manage ment of Indian Affairs, to provide for the classification of Indians, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Con gress assembled. That there shall be in the Department of the In terior a board consisting...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

FRENCH STILL CONTINUE TO FORCE ENEMY BACK Additional Gains Made by Them, Men and Guns, Being Captured as South ern Part of Hindenburg Line in France Continues to Fall Back. Petrograd, April 21.German prep arations to attack the Northern tront, supported by a German fleet, reports of which appear to be well founded, bear out the war office warning re cently issued that the enemy means to march on Petrograd. The prepara tions consist of the massing of troops on the Dvinsk-Riga front and the con centration of transports, warships and shallow draft ships in Baltic sea ports. A portion of the German fleet is re ported to have moved from Kiel to Lribau. It is regarded here as extreme ly probable that the plan is to cut off Petrograd from the active enemy. French Make Additional Gains. London, April 20Additional im portant gains have been made by the French at numerous points from Sois sons eastward tg the Champagne coun try and the capture of men and guns is noted as the southern part of ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

r*, .A'-yr, w- "q&W, 4^ |r-^% fx BIG HAPPENINGS OF THE WEEK CUT TO LAST ANALYSIS. DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ITEMS Kernels Culled From Events of Mo* ment in All Parts of the World Of Interest to All the People Everywhere. U. S.Teutonic War News Students of Hamilton college at Clinton, N. Y., of their own volition, decided by a vote to give up athletic sports for military training. Twenty-five hundred applications were tentatively accepted by the cen tral army department at Chicago for training in the six camps now being established to supply 10,000 officers for the new army. Illinois is leading the country in re cruiting for the army. Figures issued at Washington show 2,240 men en listed or the period of the war on April 18. The navy reported 999 net gain for the previous 24 hours. It was officially announced at the Boston navy yard that no credence was placed in reports from three coast guard stations on Cape Cod that heavy gunfire had been heard off the coast. The positive statement...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

A sLaeV*-*, At an editor's desk in Westerville, /O, there sits a stoutish man of about fifty-two, preparing the lay-outs of a chain of temperance magazines and newspapers His head is as bald as an egg, and it would surprise anyone who had just met him and was listening to the editor's gentle, half-timid accents, to know that the several indentations in the top of it come from revolver butts implanted there during a strug gle in a courtroom somewhere in Texas, whea the said editor was known as the most sensational news paper detective west of the Missis sippi. William Eugene Johnson is a natural-born bad man That his ac tivities have always been enlisted on behalf of good citizenship is probably an accident due to early training and environment. Picture a man of about six feet three, by four feet in diameter, an elongated flour barrel, with mus cles bulging out all over him the face of a bandit, utter fearlessness, a love of fighting surpassing an Irishman's, a strain of Indian blood...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

V''"""$ J. 5 $*% i**^ '-n cluding Theodore Roosevelt. With more than a million population It has no slums such as disfigure and dis grace even the more progressive North American cities. Within its wide mu nicipal area it has more asphalted streets than any other city can toast of, and at night its prodigal illumina tion gives the right to take from Paris the title of the "City of Light." A great thriving seaport, a wonderfully beautiful tropical capital, Rio de Janeiro visualizes the remarkable transformation which has taken place in Latin-America, and particularly in Brazil, within the past 20 years. It is more than simply a justification of re publican government in Brazil It car ries a rich promise for the develop ment of South America. A few years before the beginning of the present century, travelers de scribed Rio de Janeiro as a fever pest spot. It was under the empire one of the most unhealthful cities of South America. The sewerage system was poor and there was an almost u...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

W til WOMAN SICK Could Do No Work. Now Strong as a Man. Chicago, 111. "For about two years I suffered from a female trouble so I was unable to walk or do any of my own work. I read about LydiaE. Pinkham's Vegetable Com pound in the news papers and deter mined to try it. I brought almost im mediate relief. My weakness has en tirely disappeared and I never had bet ter health. I weigh 165 pounds and am as strong as a man. I think money is well spent which pur chases Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound."Mrs. Jos. O'BBYAN, 1755 Newport Ave., Chicago, 111. The success of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, made from roots and herbs, is unparalleled. I may be used with perfect confidence by women who suffer from displacements, inflam mation, ulceration, irregularities, peri odic pains, backache, bearing-down feel ing, flatulency, indigestion, dizziness, and nervous prostration. Lydia E. Pink ham's Vegetable Compound is the stan dard remedy for female ills. They Use 'Em in the Trenches...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

-L* Vt 'N ts CASGARETS" ACT N sick headache, biliousness, bad taste or constipation by morning. Set a 10-cent box. Are you keeping your bowels, liver, and stomach clean, pure and fresh with Cascarets, or merely forcing a passageway every few days with Salts, Cathartic Pills, Castor Oil or Purgative Waters? Stop having a bowel wash-day. Let Cascarets thoroughly cleanse and reg ulate the stomach, remove the sour and fermenting food and foul gases, take the excess bile from the liver and carry out of the system all the constipated waste matter and poisons in the bowels. A Cascaret to-night will make you feel great by morning. They work while you sleepnever gripe, sicken or cause a ny inconvenience, and cost only 10 cents a box from your store. MiUions of men and women take a Cascaret now and then and never havo Headache, Biliousness, Coated Tongue, Indigestion, Sour Stomach oz Constipation. Adv. Striving to Be Consoled. "Coal is exceptionally scarce." "Yes. But it has one element of ec...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 26 April 1917

&.' Grand Council Of American Indians, AN ASSOCIATION ESTAB L1S1IED FOR THE BETTER- MENT OF INDIAN INTERESTS. All tho* who wish to join the Grand Council of American In dians, recently organized at Wash ington, should apply to George Tinker, secretary, Paw hauska, Oklahoma, and enclose one dollar as a fee for a membership. Mr. Tinker will, upon application, furnish full information to any person who may wish to join the association. Denninsofi Wheelock COUNSELLOR AT LAW and Solicitor in Chancery Interior Department Practice. Indian Law a Speciality. Address West DePere, Wis. Frank 0. Beaulieu. ATTORNEY AT LAW. White Earth, Minn. D. B. Henderson Attorney at Law 915 Evans Bldg., Washing-ton, D. C. JOHN LEBCY Notary Public apers drawn for conveying reservation lands WHITE EAPTH. MINNESOTA Dr. Albert A. Campbell Physician and Surgeon Special attention given to dis cases of the Eve, Ear, Nose and Throat. Eyes tested. Glasses fitted OGEMA, MINN. Call me by telephone day or night. and ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

Vol. XV. i^ [-&<% Justice and Fair Dealing for every Indian who desires to become a good Citizen. THE TOMHAWK. QUS H. BEAUUEU. Publlshei WML* Earth Agency, Minnesota, Entered air the Postoffice at White Earth, Minn., as mail matter of the lecond class. SUBSCRIPTION: $1.50 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE THE CONSCRIPTION ACT. The conscription act has been passed by congress arid is now a law. The one fault among many which can be found against it by those who are opposed to a war is that it excludes the men who passed it, and likewise federal and state office holders. In making an address to cdn gress in support of the bill Rep resentative Sydney Anderson is quoted as saying regarding volun teers that those who would not answer to the call of patriotism would say "Let George go." A This is exactly what congress has done it in substance has said, "Take everybody but us." Representative Lundeen of Min neapolis voted against the con scription bill, but he gleefully ap plauded when an effort ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

APS*1 I U.S. CD-OPERATiOH RIGHTSAYSVIVIAN FRENCH VICE PREMIER ISSUES STATEMENT OF GRATITUDE OF HIS NATI ON AT STAND OF AMERICA. ALL FREEDOM'S FORCES ARE TODAY LET LOOSE Heartily Applauds America's Long Suffering Patience Before Appeal- ing to Force and Only Then When There Can Be No Other Means. Washington, April 28.In a state meat to the American press, Rene Vi yiani, France's vice premier and head of the war mission, said the co opera tion of the United States would mean not only a military victory which was already assured but a victory of mor ality and right. He expressed deep gratitude tor the enthusiastic recep tion. M. Viviani's statement follows "I am indeed happy to have been choben to represent the greetings of the French republic to the illustrious man whose name is in every French month today, whose incompai able mes sage is at this very hour being read and commented on in all our schools as the most perfect charter ot human rights and which so fully expresses the virtue...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

5lTO.!!!lllllllllllllllllllll!!lllllllllllllllll!l!llll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllI News of the Week Cut Down for BusyReaders IQUIIUHIU U. S,Teutonic War News Captain Rice of the American steam ship Mongolia, which arrived at a British port, said that the Mongolia had fired the first gun of the war for the United States and sunk a Ger man submarine. The naval gunners on board made a clean hit at 1,000 yards. The periscope was seen to be shattered. Twenty steamships, runners of Ger many's submarine blockade, arrived in the U. S. and thus made available about 60,000 tons of space for cargo awaiting means of transportation to Europe. Four of these vessels are among the largest merchantmen affoat. One is a British craft on its maiden voyage. Lieut. William F. Greshnm, U. S. N., and 11 American bluejackets. suviv ors of the American armed steamship Aztec, destroyed on April 1 by a Ger man submarine, arrived in the United States from a foreign port. Lieutenant Greshain declined to discu...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

p'fa i. i'. k* One of the most singular situations in the history of outlawry was that tackled by William Eugene Johnson in the summer of 1907. It was the case of the Monte Carlo of No Man's Land, as it was called, and called fior an exhibition of grit, courage, and self-reliance that was not shown by any other persons interested in the affair. By the middle of 1907 Johnson, big, bald, and six-feet-three, had pretty well cleaned up the bootleggers ia In dian Territory. He had made him self a terror to those who were de bauching the Indians with spirits and afterward plundering them. He had become something of a legend. Im agine a male Carrie Nation, armed not only with a hatchet and sledge hammer, but with a pair of mailed flats and all the resources of the United States Indian Department at his back. He had run up the price of spirits per pint from twenty-five cents to three dollars, and even then the trade was risky. He had herded hundreds to jail and several into the penitentiary...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

Jrci^l irv Wgir Jorrv feurope i_ A HISTORICAL OLP BOROUND CHURCH CURIOUS thing about going to Norway is the indifference and even the boredom of the fron tier officials concerning your personality, aims and antecedents. I Relieve I am correct in asserting that the frontiers you cross going from Sweden into Norway and from Sweden over to Denmark are the only frontiers in Europe today where there are no formalities or intimate questionings. Going from Stockholm to Christiania nobody wants to know even your name. At seven in the morning, when your train gets to Charlottenburg, the cus tomhouse men come aboard, lift the lid of your suitcase, aimlessly fumble a few seconds in the interior, bow, mile, salute and depart. The engine whistles, the train rolls on. In ten minutes you are in Norway. The Swedes, however, are more in quisitive about you. As you near the Swedish frontier, going south toward Gothenburg, the conductor of your train hands you a long list of questions, starting with t...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

^p **tt' l| rr?" (Copyright, by W. G. Chapman.) Jean Thayer having for the past ten .years earned her living in office posi tions, and the occasional acceptance of a story at very small pay, and with long intervals between the checks, was very glad to find herself in a position with better pay, shorter hours, and |ame promise of permanency. Like *nany other women not trained to any trade or profession, when she found herself thrown on her own resources it was a case of experimenting to see hat she could do, and like many more women who have not the faith in them selves that moves mountains, her ex periments had not met with much suc cess. When Peter Shields had asked her to be his private secretary she had at once accepted the offer. He was the senior member of a publishing firm, and had begun to withdraw from an ac tive participation in the business. He came down to the office for an hour or two, sometimes only three or four times a week. He was a collector of autograph letters and...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

pft The Rig Does Knife. r/' Love and logic are not on speaking %terms. Fourteen Years9 Experience With Good Kidney Medicine For the past fourteen years we have been selling Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root, and we cannot recall a single instance where it has failed to accomplish benefi cial results in the diseases for which it is eo highly recommended. It is a remedy that always brings satisfactory relief to those who use it and they always speak in the highest terms regarding the results obtained. Very truly yours, DIAGONAL,DRUG & JEWELRY CO. J. R. Book, Ph. G. Jw^ April 19, 1916. Diagonal, la. Prove What Swamp-Root Will Do For You Send ten cents to Dr. Kilmer & Co., Binghamton. N. Y., for a sample size bqt tie. It will convince anyone. You will also receive a booklet of valuable infor mation, telling about the kidneyB and blad der. When writing, befifty-cent sure andand mention- this paper Regula one dollar size bottles for sale at all drug stores.Adv. Eminently Qualified. A tiny b...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 3 May 1917

Grand Council Of American Indians. A N ASSOCIATION ESTAB- LISHED FO THE BETTER- MENT O INDIAN INTERESTS. All those who wish to join the Grand Council of American In dians, recently organized at Wash ington, should apply to George Tinker, secretary, Paw hauiska, Oklahoma, and enclose one dollar as a fee for a membership. Mr Tinker will, upon application, furnish full intoimation to any person who may wish to join the association. Denninson Wheelock COUNSELLOR AT LAW and Solicitor in Chancery Interior Department Practice. Indian Law a Speciality. Address West DePere, Wis. Frank 0. Beaulieu. ATTORNEY AT LAW. White Earth, Minn. D. B. Henderson Attorney at Law 915 Evans Bldg., Washington, D. C. JOHN LEECY Notary Public apirs drawn for conveying reservation lands WHITE EARTH, MINNESOTA Dr. Albert A. Campbell Physician and Surgeon Special attention given to dis eases of the Eve, Ear Nose and Throat. Eyes tested. Glasses fitted OGEM A, MINN. Call me by telephone day or night. laMMMflMMIMM^M...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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