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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

2 l"\0 you contemplate the purchase of a new threshing rig this year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on this coast? If so write us for catalogue. Mailed free on application. E * • ■ /11 111 w^ ]* jj? mi r^ r^^^ mwr^ r^ Tanks, STACKERS' Saw Mills, horse, powers. THE "RUSSELL" COMPOUND TRACTION ENGINE TAKES THE LEAD. It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner, write us for particulars. Russell Co., Portland, Oregon. 320-324 Belmont Street, 160-166 East First Street. Purebred Jersey Cattle and Berkshire Swine .... M. HORAN, • • • Wenatchee, Wash. W. M. Darlington \V. L. Darlington. W. H. Darlington Darlington Livestock Commission Co. Ship your Cattle, Sheep and Hogs to us. Fair treatment, top prices and quick returns Chicago, - .... Illinois. Elm wood Herd of A. J. C. C. Jerseys McComblnation 39961, a grandson of Brown Bessie 74997, champion cow of the Columbian Dairy Test at Chicago, at the head of the herd; 411.5...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

RANCH AND RANGE- Vol 4, No. 7. DAIRYING. A Few Tliousflits From n Plain Farmer. There seems to be a widespread notion that "farmers' butter" cannot equal in quality the product of the creamery. Go to any country store and ask the price of butter, and you will be told that "cream ery" is worth so much, while farmers' butter is at least two cents, and often five cents or more lower. The cause of this discrepancy is largely due to a lack of uniformity, not only in the product of the neighboring farms, but several samples of butter from the samo place, and made by the same person, often shows a marked difference in quality. Farm Batter Lower Price. This uncertainty in the quality of his prod uct often reacts on the dairy farmer to his pecuniary hurt. For, as we noted above, the selling price of his butter is too often lowered permanently, even when it may near ly or quite equal the product of the nearest creamery. Now dairying is, or should be, the most profitable line of employment a f...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

4 THE COW PEA. As many of our readers desire to know more about raising and feeding that valuable plant, the cow pea, we print the following article about it. From the experience we have had in cultivating and raising it, and later in chopping it up, putting in the silo and feeding it, we know it makes a valuable feed. But we will let Mr. 11. J. Waters, di rector of the Missouri Experiment Station, who has had a great deal of experience with it, tell more about it: We have been growing this plant on the college farm for the past six years or more, with very satisfactory results. It matures very easily in this climate, and even succeeds well as far north as northern and central Iow Ta. Its special value is in the renovation of the soil. It has a particularly beneficial effect upon the ground, even though the crop is harvested and removed as hay. In this re spect it is much like clover, although as a rule more beneficial on account of the larger yield. It has the ability to thrive on ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

A WORD TO THE GIRLS. Qirll in the country sometimes grow tired or the quiet routine of farm work and long for the excitements and attractions of city life. But life in Ilie city is not the public holi day it seems to the girls on their occasional visits to town. Believe me when I tell you that working girls in the city have an Infi nitely more monotonous existence than the country girls ever dream of. You get up early and work hard, it is true, but the picnics you attend in summer and the sleigh rides and'parties that enliven your win ttp give you social recreation and change, while there is always the keenest enjoyment for those who know how to read Mother Na ture's book. Think of spending every work ing day in a dingy office, writing and figuring constantly, with but half a day's vacation in tliree years, as one girl I knew of has done! Think of spending all the hot, dusty summer disys at 8 sewing machine in a factory, with the ceaseless clatter of hundreds of other ma chines all ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

6 FRUIT LAWS OF MICHIGAN. Continued trota lust week. Section 1. An act to prevent the spread ing of bush, vine and fruit tree pests, such as canker worm and other insects, and fungus and contagious diseases, and to provide for their extirpation. Sec. 2. The People of the State of Mich igan enact, That it shall be the duty of every owner, possessor or occupier of an orchard, nursery or vineyard, or of land where fruit trees or vines are grown, within this state to spray with a poisonous solution or disinfec tant and of sufficient strength to destroy such injurious insects or contagious disease, all fruit trees or vines grown on such lands which may be infested with any injurious in sect or worms, or infected with any conta gious disease known to be injurious to fruit or fruit trees or vines: Provided, That if such trees and vines are infested with the San Jose or other scale insects, such trees or vines shall be either effectually sprayed or destroy ed: Provided, also, That no such s...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

NOW THE CODLIN MOTH. The worms of the codlin moth are hatched from the eggs of small gray moths. Until within the last few years it was thought that these eggs were laid in apple-blossoming time, and in the maturing blossoms, but our best authorities now say that the eggs are not laid until several days after the blossoms have dropped, and that they are then placed by the moths anywhere upon the apples, and oftentimes upon the leaves. In from eight to twelve days the worms hatch, and soon after coming out begin to eat their way, usually from the blossom end, to the cores of the apples. In about three weeks the worms complete their growth, after which they burrow out through the side of the apple, and spin for themselves silken cocoons in any crack or crevice they may find. Ten or twelve days later the full-grown moths fly from these cocoons. In some places at least two broods, and probably three, come out during a sum mer. The winter is spent in the cocoon. Keeping the life history ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED KVKRY SATURDAY. 11l the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, aiul.Stockmcu of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. published by the RANCH AND RANOE COMPANY. Conducted by - MILLER FKEKMAN Assistant Editor - li. At. WALLACE, B. A. Editorial Offices, -... Seattle, Wash. business offices: Seattle, . . . 315-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, • - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. SimsCKIPTIOSf, IN ADVANCE, - $1.00 PER YEAR. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. In the past week some pretty choice devel opments have come out regarding the Curtis Commission Co., of which lirin we spoke in our last issue. The people at the head of this concern are either unscrupulous or are so wholly lacking iv business judgment that they are altogether unfit to have the confi dence of the farmers. Their circulars, which have been sent out in the country announc ing the great boom on at Seattle and unlim...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS. The writer enjoyed the privilege of a half hour's conversation last week with Mr. H. H. Spaulding, of the Pacific Meat Co. at Tacoina. He told us some quite interesting things about the growth of the fertilizer busi ness in that city. His company has a most complete department in their packing house for the conversion of the bone, blood and waste material into commercial fertilizers. A large part of the demand has come from the plantations of Hawaii, where such crops as the sugar cane are such an exhaustive drain on the soil that constant replenishment of the plant food elements are necessary. On the large plantations the application of fer tilizer has become recognized as of such great importance that the larger growers have employed high-salaried chemists to an alyze the soils, find out their deficiencies and determine the proportions of the different chemical substances necessary to make a per fect balance for the plant growth. They spec ify on all orders ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

10 A HOME MARKET.FOR BERRIES. In discussing this question 1 shall confine myself largely to my own personal experi ence I have sometimes had poor fruit, al ways the result of neglect, and in that case have never allowed it to tarnish my reputa tion, but quietly slipped around to some dealer and let him have it at his own price, and then devoted my energies to growing a better grade of fruit. The successful fruit grower must not only crow the finest fruit, but he must educate his customers and manipulate them so as to keep them everlastingly eating and calling for more. The greatest error a progressive ri'it ™wer ever made is to take his fruit to some groceryman to sell, and then set down until his customers carry it away. They are always exposed to free air in front of the Btore; often in the sun, and made the roost ing place for countless flies and are pawed over by the dirty hands of boys and tobacco masticators until they are unsightly andpos it velv repulsive. Then they are dish...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

MILES. E>oes it pay to raise the mule? Yes; be cause he is ill as great demand as any other animal raised on the farm and can be raised more cheaply and sells for a better price. To prove this we will take our latest gov ernment figures on horses and mules. 1 do not wish to be understood as being preju diced or antagonistic to the horse, for I am not. The horse we must have and I glory in his development as much as any one. In 181)4 there was produced 151,280 head of mules and 304,170 were sold; 1895 and 1890 show just about the same ratio —the demand exceeds the production by about 100 per cent. This is the cause of the re cent jump in prices and the healthy tone of the market. Which is the most profitable for you to raise when we are producing five times the horses that there is a market for and only one-half the mules that the mar kets are calling for, as supply and demand regulate the market? I leave this for you to decide. Tin- Government Report. We quote from Bulletin No. 1...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

12 The poultry Y ard* S. M. SHIPLEY, :::::= Editor. A NEIGHBORS TROUBLE. A neighbor called the other day and com plained that his Plymouth Bocki were not doing well. We went and examined them, finding them pale, dejected in appearance, in fact looking as though tired of life. They were confined in a small yard about 20 by 30 feet. The ground was covered with ashes and dry sand. Not a particle of grit was to be obtained. Still our friend wondered what the reason of loss of appetite, lack of health and vigor, and consequent failure to pro duce eggs could be. She might just as well expect to get steam out of a steam boiler with no water in it, as to have looked for a healthy condition in fowls which were de nied access to good sharp grit with which to grind their food in order to convert it into bone, muscle and eggs. Some people seem to think biddy is supplied with teeth and chews her food the usual way of man and beast, instead of grinding it between the sharp edges of broken rocks, ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

HARKET REVIEW. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is sell ing at in round lots: Potatoes—Yakimas, $10@ll; native, $7 @11; Biirbanks, $9@H; rose, |7@B. New potatoes are now in the market; they are 2@2|c. Five cars of potatoes were shipped from Seattle to Chicago, May G. Celery, .Ss@4oc per doz; lettuce, 45c; rad ishes, 10c; onions, $50@(>0 per ton; new on ions, 2c per lb; cabbage, lfc per lb for Cali fornia; parsnips, per sack, 75@90c; cauli flower, fl per doz; rhubarb, l£c; Walla Walla asparagus, $1 per 15-lb box; hot-house cucumbers, f1@1.25 per doz. Oregon strawberries will be in the market this week. Comb Honey—lo@llc; Nevada, 12c; strained honey, fi@6^c. There are no quotations for Washington cheese yet. Eastern cheese, 12£@l'3c; Cali fornia, ll@l2c. Apples are practically out of the market. Dried Fruit (jobbing) —Apricots, bleached, per lb., 6£@Bc; peaches, evaporated, per lb., s|@Bc; apples, bleached, per lb, 6£@Bc; PAYING PRICES. The following prices are being offer...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

14 SOME VALUABLE EXPERIENCE. When I went to the station, I determined to work out the cost of production, and since I have been there we have weighed every pound of food the animals were fed, known its cost, weighed all the milk received, and tested it for its butter fat. We feed each cow all she can consume and assimilate. At the end of the first year we found that some cows charged us 17cents per pound for but ter made from their milk, while others charged only 12 cents, and others ranged be tween these two sums. The breed made no difference; some Shorthorns made cheap but ter, and some Jerseys costly butter. Breed had nothing to do with the cost; it was all in the cow. Size or color had nothing to do with it. We put all the cows that made cheap butter on one side, and ranged the cows who charged the most for butter on the other side. Each side, no matter what breed, showed similar characteristics. Those that charged a high price were, the sleek, nice looking animals, that would a...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

FARM FOR SALE. ■William McCarty farm, fourteen miles south of North Yakima. 155 acres, for sale for $3,500. Terms. $500 cash, balance on six years' time with annual payments of $500. Interest, 8 per cent on deferred payments. Also farms In the Palouse country. For particulars write to SPARK BROTHERS, Apl 4t Tekoa. Wash. ' Homes Wanted In the new west by eastern people. If you have property In country or town for sale, list It with me, as I am In a position to correspond with peo ple who have money to invest. M. L. Matterson, North Yaklma, Wn. FINE STOCK FOR SALE. One Imported Clydesdale stallion, one 3-4th's blood Clyde Stallion, one 3-year-old and one 2 year-old Short-horn bull. Also a few Berkshire pigs at bed-rock prices. WM.A.CONANT, ; Ellensburg, Wash. Aggers & Parker Produce and Commission. Cash paid for POULTRY and EGGS, also all Produce shipped to our Alaska Branch. All consignments receive prompt attention. 911 Western Avenue • Seattle, Wash. Your boxes will never burst...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 14 May 1898

16 Two Great Machines. CLARK'S RIGHT LAP PLOW CALIFORNIA CUTAWAY and Seeder Combined. Orchard Plow bU *t3 7 HIGfIT LAP j _z^ J ' lißSiiroß^^^^^^^^ £> Wr tK~JjT~^/[iififQ THIS IS THE WONDERFUL RIGHT LAP. Read.What others say about it: Plows close to the tree without driving horses in branches. Arlington, Oregon. down and turns the ground over equal to ■"*%__ 4-Vml^ „ *, Roseburg. Oregon, Feb. 2, 1898. Shurte Bros: In regard to the "Right Lap" any plow that I ever used. I can do twice Read til IS Se^iS^cTtawa^OrSa^d Wwf SSfffiKd I bought of you last spring would say that the work with it that I can with a plow it i n my orchard and find that it is exact it has exceeded my expectations in the way and find that the ground I put in with it ly what I want and decidedly the best it does the work. It not only plows the equaled at least one-third more than that - b een trying for ye^s to Iff a^ol to do ground but leaves it in better shape for put in in the ordinary method. Money I £TT£f* ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 21 May 1898

Mnch And Range /imfu \\ ' f .. _ . , f yf^' d§' ISSUED EVERY WEEK Ik- Vol 4, No. 8. 2 Largest Assortment in the Pacific Northwest of t j AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS I 3 Embracing the Most Popular Approved Lines. t 1 EVERYTHING THAT A FARHER NEEDS. | 1 What do You Think of This: I ~3 "Baby" De Laval Hand Separators, Capacities Increased J^P" ■■IT* J IfllpfOVC YOUF DflifiCS. E^ ~*^ Designs Improved. Make them Cheaper I Km. Ipak^. Sal T\ FARM BUTTER UNSALABLE.—That this Is a positive ... Than Before .. . M ■ JBiPtfiaaS^B^. l:" 's *00 weH known. Storekeepers till over the country are J^ WtL l^£«i ■B^^fl^a2r^li^H ""w nrtua".v "I'liKi'd to turn down FARM BUTTER, because B^ "^ Buby So. S.-Quaranteed 675 pounds per hour ■Ls/^'^vX f^S^^^Sß^^Sb tllcre "S "° market for v- " does not, as a rule, come up to the Baby No. 2—Guaranteed 350 pounds per hour. JoßffiilM'v jßlpij£ . [-ril JB&B* sell anything but Separator butter. long it will he impossible to Kp»- Baby No. 2—Guaranteed 350 pounds per ho...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 21 May 1898

2 DO you contemplate the purchase of a new threshing rig this year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on this coast? If so write us for catalogue. Mailed free on application. ■ . d (~\C^ vP 'f*lliip^ll pi^^ lylll^lllV^« % *t- . 111 l\ ly»jll Tanks, stackers, Saw Mills,"" 11111111 \ HORSE POWERS. . THE "RUSSELL" COMPOUND TRACTION ENGINE TAKES THE LEAD. It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner, write us for particulars. Russell & Co., Portland, Oregon. -^ « jl tr>A. 4. ./;« wAA Poc+ PSf*ct Street. 320-324 Belmont Street, 100-100 East First Street. Purebred Jersey Cattle and Berkshire Swine ..... M. HORAN, _J ■ Wenatchee, Wash. W. M. Darlington W. 1.. Darlington. W. 11. Darlington Darlington Livestock Commission Co. Ship your Cattle, Sheep and Hogs to us. Fair treatment, top prices and quick returns Chicago, - . - ■ ■ '■"■">»■ Elmwood Herd of A. J. C. C. Jerseys McCombination 39961, a grandson of Brown Bes...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 21 May 1898

RANCH AND RANGE- Vol 4, No. 8. THE WHEAT SITUATION. A Careful Survey of the World's Markets and the Causes of the Present Excitement. The wheat market fol* the past few weeks, especially in the eastern states and in Eu rope, makes an Interesting study. The price of wheat has been quite high ever since last spring and summer, when buyers and specu lators found out that there was going to be a scarcity of wheat, a scarcity due to crop failures in other countries and not in the United States. Some growers in Eastern Washington and Oregon received 75c for their wheat early last fall. Others who would have accepted that price did not have their wheat threshed and could not; still others refused that fig ure and later sold for much less. A few de termined to wait until they could get 75c or more, some even declaring they would wait for the dollar mark. It was conceded by most persons to be risky business to expect and wait for more than 75c. Those who did, however, and waited until this p...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 21 May 1898

4 est returns. Speaking of co-operation, one of the main elements of its success is the confidence of each man in his fellow. To the stranger one of the most impressive facts Is that every man speaks well of his neighbor and seems to feel proud of his friendship and takes a deep interest in his welfare. Fruit has been considered the leader up to this year, when alfalfa passes it and now be comes recognized as the banner crop. And no wonder, for the demand for alfalfa seems to have no limit. It grows to perfection and produces most abundantly and the effort re quired in harvesting is not nearly so great as with the fruit crop. Alfalfa is being sown by every one, and in the course of a year the product will have increased many times. The consumption of alfalfa can properly be put in three distinct forms: it is sold in the field to stock men; it can be fed by the farm er to his own stock and thus marketed, and it can baled and shipped. The latter method will meet with disfavor, because...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 21 May 1898

the valley were visited and among them was Mr. Horan. He has a ranch that is one great big object lesson, that stands out be cause of indications of energetic, well-ap plied effort to its every department, as bold ly as an exclamation point behind the scare heading in the P.-I, announcing another great victory over the Spanish. Mr. Horan has been on his place only two years, yet he has done more in that time than some men would in ten. Sometime soon we are going to give a good description of his farm, with a photo-engraving representing everything as clearly as a camera will permit. Suffice it to say that as a former and a breeder Mr. Horan is a success and a credit to the valley. Capt. A. & Bnrbank is making a pretty place on the north side of the river. In five years he has worked a great change where formerly was a desert. He raises water /7^*??^3§Plis&-~- 3 _ Square No. 2, each $3 p—^J r^ "•■' I Square No. 3, " $3.50 fi^^^^^tji -^§^ \ Ro«nd No - 2 > " *3 [I jEJ ! * | ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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