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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

. the tip of the teats being now de fended on for retaining the air. In this manner the air may be left in the udder for twenty-four hours, and when recovery is assured, it should be grad ually milked out. It is needless to say that the calf should not be per mitted to suck during this period. Inflamation of the udder (caked bag) is avoided if the milking tube is thoroughly disinfected before each ap plication, and if the cow's teats and bat; and the hands of the operator have been properly cleansed. If the apparatus is kept in its case free from dust and dirt, the absorbent or medi cated cotton in the metal cylinder will efficiently filter enough air to distend the udders of six cows. After this number has been treated it is advisa ble to replace the old cotton with a fresh sterile supply, which should be placed loosely in the cylinder. While this method of treating milk fever is a comparatively easy one for a farmer or dairyman to adopt, he can not expect to have the same success ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

8 stand over night in places where the air is made impure by adjacent hog pens, barnyards, etc., and not cooling the milk to under 70 degs. immediate ly after milking. "Our makers are having hard work at the present time in many of the factories to make even a passable cheese from the quality of milk being delivered, and the quantity of milk re quired to make a pound of cheese is much greater than if the milk was in proper condition. Where the makers are careful in selecting the milk at the receiving window there is not so much trouble in the factory, which leads one to the conclusion that the makers have the solution of the prob lem in their own hands. Where we find clean, tidy factories, we in variably find clean milk delivered; and where the factory and maker are dirty and untidy, the milk is general ly of the same nature. Cleanliness is the one great feature necessary to put our cheese on a higher plane." Snide Condensed Milk The entire wholesale grocery trade is watching with i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

tain irrigated lands will always exist, c 0 that every rancher should be fa miliar with methods of drainage as we ll as irrigation. [he drainage of lands under rain fall is not a new subject, but is al way s an important one in the develop ment of farms, either old or new. New men are constantly entering the agricultural field. Men more or less experienced in agriculture in one lo cality go to another and confront new difficulties in draining their lands, so that new phases of the subject ap pear at points where least expected and demand the prompt attention of the land owners. The treatment of some large drainage projects in lowa is discussed in the light of existing conditions. Preliminary work in the development of thes large fields is not always done with sufficient thor oughness. The following suggestions to drainage engineers indicate their responsibility in the matter: Preliminary surveys should be com plete and full data should be gath ered and placed on the maps. Every owne...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

10 POULTRY . H. L. BLANCHARD ■ Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. Is. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Notes On Turkey Raising Do not depend entirely upon young birds tor breeders. It is better to nave nothing that is not at least a yearling. If you must use some young blood, have males and females of di fferent ages. That is, if the torn is two years old, he may be mated with pullets. If he is a cockerel, mate him with hens. But if possible, have breeding hens over one year old. They must be vigorous, (which means health), strong and of good medium size. Some people make the mistake of se.ling all their larger birds, and keeping the inferior stock because it will not bring as much. If you have the idea that any old thing will do to breed from, it will not take a prophet or the son of a prophet to foretell your dismal failure, and you will be added to the numbe...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

nosed cases of cholera are due to overfeeding, the fowls being in an overfat condition and desiring a change of food, especially when grain is largely used, the real cause being indigestion. The remedy is to make ', complete change of food, allowing only one meal a day. For medicine, give twenty drops of nux vomica in every quart of drinking water for a week. Succes With Hogs Success with hogs will De just in proportion to a man's attention to lit tle details and his business ability breeding and raising hogs is just as much a business a banking or any other commercial enterprie. The successful hog men of the country are big, broad-minded men, full of push and enterprise. More over, they are enthusiastic students of their business. There is no place tor a man in this work unless he is willing to give it his time and put much hard work into it. It is not the most pleasant task to sit up all night with a sow, but it is frequently neces sary. For the man who likes the business and is w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

12 dition at the time of mating. Over fat or very thin animals will not be productive of the best results. Our practice is to have the females in fair flesh and also gaining at breeding. Our boars run in lots #ox6o feet ordi narily; but where they are inclined to become fat and also lazy we place them in large lots with the young, restless pigs and thus induce them to take more exercise. The feed of the male consists of shorts, clover, hay and milk, if we have it, with root and green feed in summer and winter The sows receive a small amount of grain in connection with the above mentioned feeds in winter. The sows may run together for a time after breeding. It is necessary, however, to see that tney do not overcrowd or cuff about certain timid or less rugged ones. After a time it is desirable to separate them, putting two together until near farrowing time, when each should have a separate bed. We feed sows liberally up to within a few days of farrowing time; then cut the feed down, ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

Get A Gasoline Engine We have seen farms where hus land. wife and children tooks turns in drawing water from wells 70 feet Lncl more in depth, for as many as 'xv , ye horses and thirty head of cat tle Many a youth has his nature spoiled by too much wood-chopping, a x grinding and churning, when a small gasoline engine would not only Jin all this work, but much more, and for less money than even a boy could be hired for. A young man's brains in the way of management and ex perience are worth more than any work he can do with his hands. Give the boy a chance to be something more than a hewer of wood and draw er of water. Buy a good gasoline en oine. You will save money by it. The latest fad of the smart set in Now York is to invite cows to their dinner parties. The cows are ushered into the dining room with great pomp and ceremony. There the guests are supposed to help themselves to the milk for their coffee. I trust that none of the cows thus invited will mistake the function for a r...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

14 EXPERIENCES All subscribers are Invited to write for this column. For each accepted article we give 30 cents, either in subscription or advertis ing. Make your articles brief and write as often as you like. Cement Floors.—A letter tells me of a man who followed out directions of advance dairymen and cemented his stable floor, and it is so slippery that his cows slip and slide upon it to their possibly injury. What rem edy? Well, next summer put on a very light coat of cement again and then "block" a garden rake so the teeth will be only a fourth inch long and cross rake the floor and platform both, so to make them rough. It will smooth out a little before it sets, but there will be no more slipping and sliding and the bedding will stay un der the cows and not slip back into the gutter. Instead of the rake you can use a stiff stub broom to roughen with. While cement floors are, as a rule, permanent and the best, they do need a good soft bed between them and the cows. It will save ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

. [idly and we seldom have a fail " p The beds are a foot deep and '".,, made up of fresh manure and a '"'•. tee of good loam. The stone wall I? at the back and a foot wide board JJ 'front to keep the bed back from he path. This dark cloth curtain sus pended between the flower bench and PL mushroom bed is to darken the fed for indoor mushrooms grow bet ter in the dark than in the light, and it also helps in maintaining an agree able surface temperature* and prevents quick drying. For the. beds we use fresh manure, well rotted in the stable and with a -nod deal of straw in it. Ferment or turn this for a week or ten days, and for a hotbed, then make up the bed very firmly, compact and eight inches deep; on top of this put a four-inch layer of much finer manure, with a lit tle loam mixed through it, and pack it very firm. This will heat to a tem perature of 120 degrees or a little more and when the heat subsides to 90 degrees I plant the spawn in the beds, using English brick spawn. I ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1904

16 When Others Say i'^Msmsx *'^!n^^^.«^«-njf33t4j^ >. That theirs is the ONLY Clean Skimming Separator, or that theirs is the only DURABLE S-^^kx^JSSsJt I^*^^--. v"V Separator, or that theirs is EASIER to clean than eevry other make, they are stating mu^^^^m9 U^ B^^L^^-;-^- ,K .'. ► something that they know is not so, and cannot be borne out by facts. The TUBULAR has ■'y^s^l^^stijjv" V " '■ - - H&'V&' many times demonstrated its ability to skim cleaner than other makes, yet we do not, nor 'dS^^^S^mW "' ' '• - ~ I could we consistently, claim that we had the "only clean skimming Separator." Truthful .''^"^^^^^W^g * / * <, ' t ness towards our customers is our chief aim. If we were to make claims that violated the : ; '-^^^^i^^^^^^Ssß^ / • 'V< , ' ' truth, and people are not so blind but what they can see through random assertions, we : V>}^J!f?r,'^^^^jftsj^^^^^^^^■■ would soon lose their confidence. We have bsfore us a letter from a TUBULAR Separator Iw^^^^^^^j^^M...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

-i^^^s^SPj^""-^^W"^SMtt^BBBBfe= :^=== '^^ m$Wm^^£z^L-— • ~_--^__^=q__q_bbs__^^^Br jtj^^^sypy5BBS«k _EMM—s^^sBI—_ —_~SH^ISbs^ j«R«^s. iWSwk^SSS^^B_•* . VOL. XXII. NO. 1. Needed Legislation for the Live vStocß Interests By E. F. Benson, President State Live Stocß Association There is no question but that the laws of this state are not in all re spects up to date in reference to live stock interests. It is true the open range is, in most parts of the state, a thing of the past, having given place to fenced pastures, wheat fields and in some places to irrigated alfalfa meadows, but there is yet in Okanogan, Doug las and other counties in central Washington certain range areas not susceptible of being fenced, that must always be chiefly valuable for graz ing and it is not wise to assume that this once most important industry in this state is soon to be done away witli and that its wants are not en titled to reasonable and necessary legislation. The live stock industry in Wash ington is j...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

2 expenses incident to this work and every Montana stock grower is more than satisfied with the expenditure and enthusiastic over the results. 2nd. A state bounty on coyotes and other wild animals. The direct damages caused by coy otes are much greater than any one would suppose who has not given at tention to the matter and the indi rect loss to the state is enormous. The coyote pest is a constantly in creasing menace. It is safe to say that 90 per cent of all the sheep losses in this state re sult from coyotes and lambing ex penses are quadrupled on that ac count. While these losses alone must run up into hundreds of thousands of dollars, the amount is small com pared to the damage done to farmers scattered all over the country. The stealthy coyote reaches the most thickly settled rural districts and lives on the fat of the land. Chick ens suffer most, but pigs and calves, melon patches and fruit all contrib ute to his support. Were it not for this pest, nearly every farmer would ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

THE RANCH Olllco: 330 Colman Building MILLEK FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors * w VLDEN, H. L. BLANCHARD h MRS. S. C. BUTCHER j^.d the First and Fifteenth Each Month Subacrlptloa, In advance, one year 60 *ix months, 30 cents. If on time, .übscriptiOßi will be $1. Seattle subscrib n,. required to pay fl.oo per year, on c , un t of local postage. v e nti wanted In every town to solicit , u b crlption* Good commissions and sal .l, r h paid to hustlers. ' The paper is sent to each subscriber until order to discontinue is received from the Ul -Tiber. W<- must be notified in wr'ting. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber Ills paper stopped. Returning the iappr will not answer as we cannot find it on „iii- list from the name alone on the Da pi i We must have both name and ad ,l,, and all arrearages or dues must be '„ as required by law. Date of expira t j,,n |i shown on your paper by address containing your name. ' Falling to receive the paper regularly, VIIU should...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDF.N It was my privilege to attend the Kittitas County Farmers' Institute recently. I delivered two lectures on fruit growing. Dr. S. B. Nelson, of Pullman College, delivered some very instructive lectures on diseases of fowls, calves and cows and one valu able lecture on the benefits we derive from scientific investigations Dr. Nelson is so well informed that his lectures are always of the greatest benefit to farmers We shall never know how much we are indebted to him for warding off diseases that would cause the loss of many thous ands of dollars to the stock men of this state. An expert, such as Dr. Nelson is, can always give valuable information and what he says should be heeded by all who raise farm ani mals from a hen up to a fine horse. * * • The people of Kittitas County are deeply interested in fruit growing. This in part is no doubt owing to the fact that the Capital, published in El lensburg, has a wide-awake editor who has been caring the attention o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

imost as soon starve a calf as a '?'ee Neither is advisable. If you an! to kill a tree root and branch allow a leaf to get as big as a "\ n rol's ear and it will starve to !Lth Trees may live without roots !.,,] often do as in the case of willows, , ut i lie elaborated sap* in the cuttings out roots and these begin to in the nutriment from the soil 2nd the leaves that start from the same Source cook it up, so to speak, into jjg, tible form. This lesson on the nature of tree growth may be turned to .i practical account in pruning. Re member never to leave your tree in sucl i condition that it will not put out ■eaves in the early spring. It may survive but "it will have a hard road to travel." There is a difference in different kinds of trees where they store their elaborated sap. A peach tree stores the most of its elaborated sap In its body while an apple tree has the most in the limbs. This ac counts for the fact that a peach tree can 1)9 pruned more heavily than an apple tree with...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

r> THE DAIRY State Dairymen's Convention Following is the official program of the twelfth annual meeting of the Washington State Dairymen's Asso ciation to be held at Olympia, Janu ary 19, 20 and 21, 1905: First Day—Thursday, Jan. 19, 10 a. m. Meeting called to order by the President. Reading of the minutes of the last meeting and report of the Secretary and Treasurer. "Ten reasons why we should en large and improve along all the lines of study and work of dairying," J. P. Marks. Thursday, 1:30 p. m. Annual address Pres. B. F. Reed "Leaks" W. J. Langdon "Care of the Dairy Cow".. .D. S. Troy "Preparing Butter for the Mar ket" Wm. M. Pease Discussion opened by J. A. Woll. Thursday, 7:30 p. 111. Address of Welcome President Chamber of Commerce of Olympia. Response H. L. Blanchard "Among the Cheese-makers of Hol land" Prof. B. E. Elliott, State Agricultural College. Second Day—Friday, Jan. 20, 9:30 a. m. Appointment of committees by the President. "The Quality of Washington Butter." ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

D fight 'em and win, if you will fol- gome of these bugs are our friends; hO , net into our cream and sour it roper!?* causing the globules of but f pr to free themselves properly and imoert a good flavor to the butter y e s we might say it is bug juice that „i v, good creamery butter that rich, aromatic flavor the millionaire likes L well, and is willing to pay for. There are other of these bugs which are not our friends, and get into our cream! and give our butter that musty tas te. You can tell that they have been in some of your country cream, too Well, how are we going to sepa rate the sheep from the goats in these bug families? We will tell you. We are going to have you keep out bugs of all kinds as much as possi ble Then, when we get the cream, W e will keep a few million of these friendly bugs bottled up, and when we have run out all of the unfriendly bugs we will turn our friendly bugs into this clean cream pasture, and make them give our butter just the flavor we want. Do ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. 8. C. BUTCHER Communication! for this department may be sent to Mrs. 8. C. Butcher, BUensburg. Wash., or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. the Most Expensive Foods Not Best. Scientific research, interpreting the observations of practical life, indi cates that a fourfold mistake in food economy is very commonly made. First the costlier kinds of food are used when the less expensive are just as nutritious and can be made near ly or quite as palatable. Secondly the diet is apt to be one sided, in that foods are used which furnish relative ly too much of the fuel ingredients and too little of the flesh forming ma terials. Thirdly excessive quantities of food are used; part of the excess is eaten and often to the detriment of the health part is thrown away in table and kitchen wastes. Finally serious errors in cooking are com mitted. For the well-to-do the worst injury is that to health; but people...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

s HOUSEHOLD ■ MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Communication* for thla department may be sent to Mrs. S. C. Butcher, EUlensburf. Waih , or direct to The Ranch. All «um tlon» will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are weloome. the Most Expensive Foods Not Best. Scientific research, interpreting the observations of practical life, indi cates that a fourfold mistake in food economy is very commonly made. First the costlier kinds of food are used when the less expensive are just as nutritious and can be made near ly or quite as palatable. Secondly the diet is apt to be one sided, in that foods are used which furnish relative ly too much of the fuel ingredients and too little of the flesh forming ma terials. Thirdly excessive quantities of food are used; part of the excess is eaten and often to the detriment of the health part is thrown away in table and kitchen wastes. Finally serious errors in cooking are com mitted. For the well-to-do the worst injury is that to health; but peop...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1905

Growing Wheat and Its Consumption Recently Secretary Wilson of the Department of Agriculture called at trition to the fact that in most of the older states wheat production per acre lias fallen off, and points to this fact a s conclusive evidence that the soil element! in wheat production are be coming exhausted. No doubt there is muC h truth in this. But it is very we il known by good farmers, who me thodically pursue a crop rotation which includes red clover and other leguminous plants followed by wheat, that the latter crop is grown in as large production as it ever was, and so there is nothing to become alarmed a t, lest the country should permanent ly fall below the demand for this great cereal. Soil humus and nitrogen are the great and essential elements in wheat growing. Red clover, cowpeas and other legumes supply both of these. In Southern Illinois where wheat soils became greatly exhausted farmers resorted to cowpea crops in the rotation, and the result on the following cr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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