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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

THE JOHNSON ROD MECHANIC Continued from page 16. The problem: few Americans took the car seriously. The Austin was too small for the average family. Sitler's Bantam was a roadster He bought it new for the original price of $335-00. It carried a 4-cylinder, 13 horsepower engine. The economic features of the car probably helped to endear it to Sitler's frugal nature. At any rate, he treated the car more like a beloved pet than a mode of transportation. Joe gulped his drink hurriedly and started to leave. "Drop back over this afternoon and we'll listen to the ballgame, I suggested. "I'd like to but I've got to get this job done. My mechanic moved last week and I have to do all the work. It's hard to find mechanics now. All the good ones are moving to the city where the money is." "I'm a good mechanic, Joe," Lilburn spoke up. His interest had perked up at the mention of a job. Why don't you hire me?" Joe stopped and scratched his head as if in deep thought. He knew Lilburn well, and he ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1986 A SPECIAL LETTER FROM A READER The following is a letter from Nell Thompson of Daleville, Virginia concerning the Concord Primitive Baptist Church. This is a copy of the note written by Leahvanna Clifton Cassell and her husband Russell B. Cassell some years ago. "Elder E.E. Cassell, Mrs. Ida Harris and the Deacons of Concord Church at Meadows of Dan, Virginia : We, Russell B. Cassell and Leahvanna Cassell, acknowledge the thanks extended to us by the Church of Concord at Meadows of Dan and feel grateful that we could help do something to make the Church House a more comfortable place to hold services during the winter months. We are not oblivious of the honor that your thoughtful kindness has bestowed upon us by entering our names on the "Church Book" of Concord Church and there is something else we wish to remind the Church, that our most sincere and humble thanks goes repeatedly to the One that, through us, it was made possible that we could ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

THE COUNTRY MOUSE By: Mel Tharp Four months in the city and already I was a jailbird. How could such a thing happen to an innocent law-abiding, young man from the hinterlands of western Kentucky. It happened this way. I had just graduated from high school that spring. World War Two had just ended and the world seemed ful of hope. I had a college scholarship awaiting me that coming fall, and I felt that I was justified in wanting to have some of the fun and frivolity of the city before settling down to a semester of scholastic grind. My father tried to sway me from my decision to migrate to the bright lights. He offered to get me a job at the plant where he drove a truck. But shoveling rock for the Hartford Limestone Company was not my idea of a way to spend a summer vacation. In a final effort to deter me, he related to me the fable of the city and the country mouse. It was almost inspirational how Dad in his simple, stumbling manner, related how that know-it-all country jake mouse ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1986 CHAPLIN wr ZA iz 'isif July tuff The small "R" marker to tne right is one of the eight markers noting child- ren's graves. Years ago when the Meadows of Dan Baptist Church cemetary was cleaned and landscaped a few old rock headstones were misplaced. The intention was to replace the markers someday but time edged forward and the memories of those plain old rock markers soon faded from the minds of all but the oldest of the church members. Finally it seemed that those buried where the old markers once stood were not only gone but were forgotten as well. Forgotten that is by everyone except Miss Addie Wood. Her memory recalled the names of the folks buried in the unmarked graves but more important she recalled a promise made to her mother many years ago that she would "see to it" that the graves would someday once again be marked. Miss Addie is 85 years old and lately her promise to her mother has been weighing heavy on her mind: somehow she had t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

THE COUNTRY MOUSE Continued from page 19. them. They were trying to outdo one another in seeing who could snap off the biggest branch. All of a sudden, Cuttridge, who held the biggest branch of blossoms climbed down and said to me," I have to tie my shoes. Hold my blooms for a minute, I'll be back." So I held the blooms. At that moment, a policeman put his hand on my shoulder. 'Well, well," he said. "A bunch of yahoos defacing public property ." He asked our names and started writing them on a piece of paper. Once he had our names, he marched us over to the street corner where a police car was waiting. A few minutes later we were at the police station. At the station, the desk sergeant booked us and advised us that we could make bail if we wished to do so. Otherwise, we would spend the night in jail and we were to appear for trail the following morning. Cuttridge assured us that everything would be all right. He would make a phone call and his father would be down shortly to bail us...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1986 ADDIE'S WORD Continued from page 20. for the cemetery committee to put the markers up and was now waiting for a second reply'. They asked, 'lf you're turned down again, what's your next step?' I said I was hoping to locate some relatives of the folks for some help. They replied, 'Go ahead. If it's money needed then we'll help.' They sent the date for the Chaplin children's marker and said the children's father and mother, Reverend George Henry and Frances Jefferson Chaplin were buried at the Stone Mountain Church. The markers are up now and many thanks to Frances Jefferson Bowman and Nellie B. Bausell for their financial support'.' " The new markers are for the graves of : The Chaplin children were Sarah C. Chaplin, born 1849, died 1854 and Elizabeth C. Chaplin, born 1847, died 1854. James and Mary Rutledge and eight of their children. All died of dipth—eria in 1884. [Names of the children are unknown.] Levi and Nancy Fitzgerald, dates unknown....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

BACKROADS Continued from page 22. board for many of the Parkway workers. 09-4 (0.1) At this stop sign, cross The Blue Ridge Parkway, bearing slightly to your left an then turn right on state road U63. 09.8 (0.4) Here on your left is a private park with a wooden arched bridge crossing a beautiful glistening stream. 11.0 (1.2) An old weathered barn sits here in the fields to your left with a picturesque view of the mountains in the background. 12.1 (1.1) The old church on your left is Mt. View Regular Baptist church. While walking through the cemetary beside the church, we found many headstones indicating people who lived in the early 1800' s had been buried there . 12.2 (0.1) Almost directly across from the church, we will turn right on state road 1472. 12.4 (0.2) To your right is a pretty little farm pond. It was frozen ove the day we did Backroads and that made it even prettier. 12.6 (0.2) There is an old farmhouse here on your right. 13.5 (0.9) At this stop sign, we will turn righ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1986

ft.- V fil Jjm+M HEARTOF THE BLUE RIDGE TAoiintain «i« \yur y -' A Copyright 1985 Laurel Publications Inc. FEBRUARY / * 1986 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Baekroads BACKRO^^ mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or' a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. This month our Backroad Tour will take us through Alleghany County, a beautiful rural mountain county in the northwestern part of North Carolina. It is the sixth smallest of the state's 100 counties, being taken from bordering Ashe County in 1859The word "Alleghany" is said to be derived from the Indian name meaning "fire stream". The name is suitable for this scenic, unspoiled county which is drained by the New River. On our Backroad this m...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

Monthly Journal of Mountain Life OUR THIRD ANNIVERSARY ISSUE Dear Readers, Yep, it's been three years this month since the first issue of The Mountain Laurel. Three years that we feel has been a "marriage" between readers and writers. So many of you have been so generous in sharing your wonderful stories with us all. To all of you who have contributed in every way, we say thank you. Our goal was to preserve some of the good old time stories of the Blue Ridge and share its "bigger-than-life" way of life and beauty with others. Readers have responded from all over the country proving that when you share the Blue. Ridge, that love doesn't diminish by giving it away, it grows. In this issue, we want to give you readers a present. We have had so many requests for copies of our first issue. We regret that we do not have any issues left to send. Those of you who have copies of that first issue from March of 19&3 number few among our present number of subscribers. As our present...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1986 "MIZ SARAH" (1863-1949} ' m Wy f ■HH| ? | >9H| '», V,> W 9Hlr m '*' . > . > --^- ;: *-*^f i/»» * /-.• **&'- .„ ' B K - W ■r.'a.i, M |gK x : " AM , «'„f ** * * ' <■- - Sarah Cockram French on her horse "Old Mae". Her daughter Al ice is standing at right of house. Many times I stand on the mountain top and gaze into the valley below at a winding trail leading to the remains of a tiny log cabin. This cabin was the home of a real pioneer lady in the Blue Ridge, Sarah Cockram French. She came here from West Virginia and was commonly called "Miz Sarah" by everyone. She was a person with a lot of spirit. There's hardly a person in the Meadows of Dan area over the age of fifty who doesn't remember going to Miz Sarah's. Miz Sarah and her daughter Alice lived in a beautiful valley about one and a half miles down the mountainside. Lordy! Was that winding path steep! I often wonder how those tw...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

THE DAY OF THE EASTER EGG HUNT By: Beulah S. Fox It was the last of March with the chill still in the air. Stowersville School, named for the ancestors of some of the pupils who attended, stood just off the dirt road in Bland County, Virginia, showing its age of over a hundred years. Once it had been a larger school, but now it was lucky to have 20 pupils in seven grades and one teacher. The pupils were bright-eyed children of farmers who tilled the surrounding fields. Teachers had done their best to make the schoolroom liveable by whitewashing the walls. Wainscoating came up about a yard from the floor. Many holes had been cut in the wood by pocket knives, the holes were stuffed with paper and broken pencils. A few windows were broken with cardboard tacked in. The sun came in through the high windows spotting the heads of the children and making a pattern on their desks. On that particular day, excess energies had accumulated for everyone was looking forward to the Easter egg hunt ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

PAGE A MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, I^Bb HOW PA GOT TO BE HEAD OF HIS HOUSE Taylor Ryan is the author of "My Love Is A Land So Fair". Billy McKay was the pen name I used in the Tri-State Press while covering the evacuation on Powell River when TVA built Norris Dam. For a lot of folks the evacuation meant the end of a way of life. But for Alec Bostic it meant a new beginning, in more ways than one. Troy, his oldest son, and one of my closest boyhood friends, wrote me this account. Dear Billy McKay: I promised to write you about how we got away from the River a few years after you folks left, and how glad we were to get away from there before the Carews and Tollivers went to war against the TVA for building the Dam. Pa and I always thought it was stupid tc want to stay in such a place in the first place. As you may recall, our farm was so far back on Yellow Branch the Lake reservoir would not have reached us if we had wanted to stay. But to us moving off the River was not the end of the wor...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

HOW PA GOT TO BE HEAD OF IS HOUSE Continued from page 4. Mom, like us youngins, was born in this house. It had been, when she was our age, the handsomest house on Yellow Branchthe farm twice as big then, the coves black loamed as river bottoms. Mom's folks, the Jake Carews, had been the finest folks (but the sorriest farmers, Pa declared) in the community. Miss Maggie Carew (before Pa married her) was always voted the prettiest girl at the pie supper. If anybody had the spirit of Carew's Hundred, that all this land where a Carew had set foot was sacred ground, Mom's folks had it. That, though, was so long ago that now the clapboards on the house were the deadgray of a dirt dauber's nest. Its oak insides were gloomy as caves. As for the farm, Pa swore it had grown to be the worst rundown patch of sawbriars on Yellow Branch, except of course Uricle Peevie's half. That didn't make it any precious to Mom. She had heired the place. Pa come, so to speak, as part of her inheritance by way ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1986 ELIZABETH'S JOURNAL Nov. 27, 1847- It has been a long time from- my Journal. Mr. McClure went and made a school at Mr. St. Clair's for himself and one at Mr. Crumps for me, then come and bought a buggy and swapped horses. We went over the river to Father McClure's, stayed two days. Our expenses there and back was $3- Three of the girls married; went to see all of them; stayed all night with Mr. Carter then come on home; found the neighborhood all in a tumble about my school. [First part unreadable] chills, sprained my ankle terrible. Began my school and not well. Been here one week. I cleaned out the trunk, put my things, in the new large one and Mr. Mc' s in his. Doubled and twisted some yarn. Wed. Ist Dec. 1847. Just came from school, had 22 scholars, a heap trouble to keep school. I come home each night weary of life itself. I have a good time enough here at Mr. Lowe's but it does pester me to keep school, but I see no prospect of ever getting t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

HOW PA GOT TO BE HEAD continued from page 5. there.- You'd never allow the farm to be sold. Only way I could figure how to get rid of it was to shunt it off on some dumb doctor for bills and tonic." "No use you're carryin' on like that, Alec. You know it." "When I get up there in that Plateau air, I'll prove it- Prove there ain't a thing wrong with me except hope was dead. I'll never touch a drop of spirits. I'll work sixteen hours a day." Mom's action, the way she turned back to the dishpan, spoke more finally than words. Just then Patrie said from the window, "I see Uncle Peevie coming down the hill." Pa's hand came up into two bailee} fists, and set his shoulders straight on his spine again. "I'm going' in and pack my belongin's," he said grimfaced. In a dead silence he walked through the kitchen and into the living room and we heard him go into the bedroom and slam the door. Mention of Uncle Peevie's name always gave Pa the weak trembles. The thought of moving in with Uncle Peev...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1986 AMAZING UNCLE JIM In the early spring of 1949 my father's grandmother died. We were living in the Piedmont section of North Carolina at the time, and my father's Uncle Jim telephoned us. "Her funeral will be up here in Franklin," he told my father. "She's lived here all her life. This is where she wanted to be buried." My father decided that all of us should go. "Uncle Jim has invited us to stay up there with him for a few days," he said to my mother. Then he pulled one of my pigtails. "You'll like Uncle Jim, Sis." Despite the sad reason for the trip, I couldn't help but be excited. Franklin had been my father's boyhood home, but it had been almost five years since he'd last taken us there. I was also curious about my father's Uncle Jim. I'd overheard my father tell my mother that he was "a real attention-getter." I knew nothing else about him except that, before retiring, he'd taught school and that once he'd served a term on the North Carolina St...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

THE ALMOST PERFECT SHOT It was a back-woodsy barroom. Hunters in every variety of garb filled it to overflowing. Their talk, loud and endless, made the rafters quiver. They bragged; they complained; they roared with laughter; they argued. As happens, an unexpected and sudden lull came; quietness settled over the room as the voices stopped; and a prim and prissy looking gent at the bar was heard by everyone in the room: "...most remarkable shot I ever made. Newspapers from coast to coast picked it up; magazines..." Seemingly as one man, the crowd asked, "What shot?" Surprised at all the attention yet obviously pleased, the little man explained: "It was three years ago this fall. I had a leg injury and I couldn't walk much; but I managed to make my way very quietly to where I could sit on a stump near a grassy clearing in the spruce. An hour went by, and then another, and I was almost ready to pick myself up and leave, when I heard a sudden -.tiny stir of Quality Health Care I n The C...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1986 ANEW PREACHER IN TOWN. A NEW SERIES STARTING IN APRIL. I know many of you have enjoyed Elizabeth's Journal and regret that it is coming to a end this month. But, for your reading enjoyment next month, we will be starting a new series, "A new Preacher in Town." It was written by Earnest Markwood Pritchard, edited and submitted by his daughter Emily Pritchard Cary. It is a story of Earnest Pritchard and his family and what it was like growing up a son in the family of a Methodist Minister in the small coal mining towns of West Virginia. His father, the "Preacher," in the story was Millard Fillmore Pritchard. He was born in Ritchie County (then) Virginia in 1857. This series of stories took place between 1893 and 1905- During that time there were many moves and adjustments for -the family, and many interesting, happy, sad, and memorable incidents in between. This month we are going to fill you in on a little of the family background so you can enjoy ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

Love is a word we never heard much in our family. It was something we felt, and sharing was not talked about. It was something we did. Looking back, it seems love and sharing just came naturally in our family. I suppose that is because we never heard our parents fight or even argue about anything. Oh yes, they would disagree quite often, but' they always sat down and talked it out, whatever the problem. We were very safe and secure in our little log cabin in the hollow, surrounded by tall mountains. There were no other children to play with except at school or Sunday School, and most families were about like ours. We didn't appreciate it at the time, but I'm sure the feeling of security we had as children was unsurpassed . Spring in the John Hayes Hollow was an exciting time. Lots of wonderful things began to happen and for most kids, topping that list was "school out". Not me. I loved school and I cried all the way home every last day of school that I can remember. Oh, I never let ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 March 1986

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MARCH, 1986 The Mail Box Dear Mountain Laurel, Please renew The Mountain Laurel to my husband and mother-in-law. It is a highlight at our house to get your paper in the mail, for it takes me back to 1950 and going to Floyd to see Grandma and Grandpa Moran. We would have to go up from Button Creek to Floyd, then down in the mountains to see them, and I mean down. I will never forget going to the spring, and getting into the cream, just putting one's finger in the cream and then in the mouth - so good. Food was simple corn bread and beans and big gingerbread cookies and pickled eggs sitting in the ice box. The best thing about going to Grandma's house was Uncle Ray. He would take his fiddle down and play the night away. We kids (there were eight) would love it. Keep up the good work. J. McDaniel Salem, VA Mt. Laurel, My husband is 75 and he is not a reader. He will read the Bible and the sport section of the news paper. Well, last night he read the story of Cha...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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