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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

November 1992 Farmers Market (Continued from Page 14) TROV-BILT ROTOTILLERS discount prices. Cal Hickory Hi Nursery for information. 703-942-3871. LARRY GRIMES EXCAVATING. Licensed contractor. Reasonable rates, free estimates. Cal 703-788-9211. ANTIQUE REPRODUCTIONS custom made & repair handcrafted solid wood. See direct. Sprouse's, 703-894-0736 or 703-894-4809. LUXURIOUS MERINO LAMBSKINS great for floors, chairs, cars. Machine washable, $80. Stony Mountain Fibers. 295-2008. CUSTOM DESlGN—lnterior spectaSst, drywal & fine carpentry, commercial & residential. Cal Jim Byers at 561-2432. ENHANCE YOUR COMPUTER INVESTMENT. Agribusiness programmer offers solutions, support, service and savings. Can led, 376-5844. POLE BULDNGS—horse, farm, commercial, quaity, value, service. FUOG/lnterbuild, Inc., Purcellville, VA. 1-800-432-3864. THE DATING BANK, meet exciting new dates. Computer GUARANTEES dates in your area. Send your age, interests, $19.95 to POB 261...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

WeDo Best AUTO • HOMEOWNERS • LIFE /o/\A\ 700.4 OOA Compare Farm Bureau's ™ ' Rates and Services. Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company Early Settlers Insurance Company Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company ■ »1 I I t l 1 I Southern Farm Bureau Annuity Insurance Company 200 West Grace Street P.O. Box Richmond, Virginia 23261 Tax Deductible 3 Running for Office 9 Convention 7-10 Pig Out 11 Contributions „ , Pullout Section , mr Elections for president, vice In her New Wellness column, Contributions to Ag in the president, women's chairman All about VFBF's 67th Jeanine Sherry explains why Classroom are now tax and four directors will be Annual Convention pork makes a "light" meal, deductible. held at this year's convention. Nov. 30-Dec. 3-

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

Vol. 51, No. 10 Farm Bureau president hopes for more Extension funds, stricter deer control By GREG HKXS VFBF Communications Director RICHMOND—The President of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation is hopeful that new stringent child labor restrictions will be rescinded, and that more Cooperative Extension funding will be restored in the 1993 General Assembly. C. Wayne Ashworth made the remarks during his annual address to VFBF voting delegates Dec. 1 at the Richmond Marriott where he also lauded farmers' environmental efforts. "Many of you voiced concerns this fall over new child labor regulations, which threatened to cut our labor market by as many as 3,000 workers," he told the organization's 275 delegates at the 67th Annual Convention. Ashworth was referring to tighter restrictions on child labor which went into effect July 1. The new restrictions raise the minimum age from 16 years of Officers, directors re-elected to the board RICHMOND—Voting delegates to the Virginia Farm Burea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

2 VFBF's '93 legislative agenda includes deer control, Extension funding The new year is upon us. And with it comes Farm Bureau's challenge to deliver the most pressing issues facing agriculture to our state legislators. During the 1993 General Assembly, which begins Jan. 13, we will work to restore much-needed funding for the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, seek better ways to reduce the state's growing deer herd, and strive to preserve the land use taxation program. We will also continue working to reduce health care costs and fight to keep government from regulating farmers out of business. Here are some of the most important issues we will be lobbying for during the 1993 General Assembly: Extension Funding Farm Bureau will work to restore $3 -4 million to the Extension budget. Gov. L. Douglas Wilder proposed cutting $12.2 million from the 1992-94 budget last year, but $5 -8 million of that amount was restored. If we don't get another $3.4 million restored to the budget, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

December 1992/ January 1993 Ag pesticide recycling efforts under way in Virginia (Continued from Page 1) the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, began collecting empty jugs for the recycling program. Collection stopped in mid-September. A total of about 11,000 pesticide containers were collected by the three localities. While that represents only a small percentage of the pesticides used in those three areas, Johnson called it a "good start." There were several reasons why Johnson thinks the program wasn't as successful as he'd hoped. One problem was that the containers had to be triple rinsed, as dictated by law. But that is true even if the jugs are going to the landfill, Johnson said. Another obstacle was convenience. In each of the three localities, farmers were required to collect their empty containers and then bring them to a specified collection site on a certain day. In Southampton County, the extension agent allowed farmers with 50 or more containers ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

4 Jan. 12: Computer record-keeping workshop, P.D. Pruden VoTech Center, Suffolk. Conducted by the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service. Call 703-231-7727 or 703-231-7722. Jan. 12: Runoff pollution meeting, sponsored by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, in Abingdon. Call 703-347-6420 for more information. Jan. 12: Monthly Friends of the Industry of Agriculture breakfast meeting, 8 a.m., Comfort Inn, 3200 W. Broad St., Richmond. $7. Contact Jeb Hockman, 804-281-1000. Jan. 13: Computer record-keeping workshop, Sheraton Inn, Harrisonburg. Conducted by the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service. Call 703-231-7727 or 703-231-7722. Jan. 13: Runoff pollution meeting, sponsored by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, in Roanoke. Call 703-347-6420 for more information. Jan. 14: Runoff pollution meeting, sponsored by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, in Farmville. Call 703-347-6420 for more information. Jan. 14: Computer record-k...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

December 1992/ January 1993 Natural Resources secretary advocates voluntary control of runoff By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News EdHor CHARLOTTESVILLE—Virginia will continue to advocate a voluntary approach to controlling agricultural runoff. That was one of the main points Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources Elizabeth Haskell made to farmers and Virginia Farm Bureau Federation lobbyists gathered at the Charlottesville Sheraton Inn Nov. 4 for the 1992 Resolutions Committee Meeting. "We're interested in how to reach more farmers with the voluntary conservation effort," Mrs. Haskell said to the group. "The Virginia Farm Bureau has contributed immensely to Virginia's efforts so far and we want to encourage you to continue," she praised. Besides being good stewards of the land, there are tangible benefits to Farm women reminded of March conference This year promises to be an exciting one for Farm Bureau Women. And you will want to either stay involved or get involved if you're not alre...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

6 1 't I ' laMji '' gTIMfly!^ ,j ', ..... —ml JL* ~J -JHHHBHHHHK (L-R) James R. Nichols, dean of Virginia lech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, presents a painting to Paul Melon as part of a dedication ceremony at the MkJdeburg Agricultural Experiment Station. Virginia lech President James D. McComas and interim dean, Andy Swiger, assist with the presentation. Kinks worked out of voice mail Members urged to hang on, not hang up By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News EdHor RICHMOND —After several months of crossed wires, most of the kinks have been worked out of Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's new voice mail system. And now that the computerized answering machine is working smoothly, VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth is hoping that the system will work to members' advantage. "I think it's going to be a good thing as soon as we all get used to it," Ashworth said. "Our intention is to give our members better service." While some may not view voice mail in that light, the computeri...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

December 1992/ January 1993 Convention '92:100,000 Families Strong November 30-December 3, 1992 • Richmond Marriott • Convention Wrap-up Innovative farming helped Areys win YF of the Year RICHMOND —Diversified farming practices, organic fertilizer and computerized record-keeping helped earn Carl and Maxine Arey the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1992 Young Farmers of the Year Award. The Areys run a 333-acre poultry, dairy and feed grain operation near Mt. Solon in Augusta County. They were presented this year's award at a special breakfast Dec. 1 during the VFBF's 67th Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. The annual year-long competition weighs a farmer's or farm couple's overall success and progress in farming and management ability, as well as their leadership abilities. To diversify their farm, in 1983 the Areys built a turkey house in which they raise turkey hens on contract for Rocco Inc. Approximately 62,000 birds are raised annually and almost one million pounds of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

8 To the right, newly crowned Mtes Virginia Farm Bureau Cheryl Ifeytor of Brunswick County is congratulated by VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth. Below, Mtes Farm Bureau contestants listened intently to instructions csunng tneir afternoon practice. (Photo® by Kathy Dbcon) Tech freshman couldn't believe he won the Discussion Meet RICHMOND—"I just can't believe it," Robert Mills kept saying over and over as he sat on his new Polaris 2x4 Urail Boss. Mills was given the all-terrain vehicle for winning the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Yxing Farmers' 1992 Discussion Meet. The 19-year-old Virginia Tech freshman from Pittsylvania County raises corn and sweet potatoes near Danville He was one of four state finalists discussing how agriculture can improve public awareness of environmental issues during Farm Bureau's 67th Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. "Tbday, through education, legislation and strong public relations, farmers can promote agriculture as a safe, viable source for...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

December 1992/ January 1993 Veteran employee earns prestigious Warren Beach Award RICHMOND—A Lunenburg County native and friend of agriculture has been honored with the highest award of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmers' State Committee. The Warren Beach Award was presented to W.B. "Ben'' Wilkinson Jr. of Dundas, who retired Aug. 1 after 42 years of service to the VFBF. Wilkinson was a farmer and member of the Lunenburg County Farm Bureau in 1950 when the VFBF was reorganized and a property insurance company was created. He served as the Lunenburg County insurance advisor and later as an agency manager for the Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co. He was recruited in 1965 to become Southside District field Youths recogrized for creating posters that depicted farm ife RICHMOND —More than a dozen youths received trophies at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 67th Annual Convention for creating posters that best depicted farm life in their districts. These winner...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

10 Alternative crops offer money-making opportunities By NORM HYDE VFBF broadcast ecttor RICHMOND—There are many more money-making opportunities in Virginia agriculture than just traditional crops and livestock, as Farm Bureau members learned at the annual Commodity Appreciation Day Nov. 30 during their annual convention. Fish farming is one of those opportunities. Dr. Brian Nerrie, aquacultute specialist at Virginia State University, said that while fish farming is relatively new in Virginia, there are now at least 100 full- or part-time aquacultute producers. The industry has suffered some of the typical growing pains expected of a fledgling business. Nerrie said that Virginia fish farmers have to purchase their fingerlings and often, their feed, from out of state. But with a 2-1 growth ratio for pounds of feed to pounds of form-raised fish, the profit potential is there. Nerrie said beginning fish farmers need to figure out where to get their feed, where to buy their fingerlings,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

December 1992/ January 1993 Flowering plants make good gifts if instructions are included Like no other gift, flowering plants mark festive occasions, convey best wishes and brighten the first weeks of winter. I remember the year I took these words to heart and gave plants to nearly everyone on my gift list. I was pleased when my presents were well received, but soon the calls came. "The poinsettia you gave me is dropping leaves.'' "The pepper plant is drooping.'' "How do I take care of the cyclamen?" In my enthusiasm to enliven everyone's decor, I had overlooked the fact that some of my friends were not born with "green thumbs." The reason they had few indoor plants was that they knew little about caring for them. I do things a little differently now when I consider giving a plant as a gift. First, I evaluate the potential recipient's personality and lifestyle. A person who is a steadfast saver may get a different plant than someone who can enjoy a plant while it is at its best, th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

12 Healthcare • M' ) < Iff :(i()|( )f I Cj( M. I hi' ;to<ili Of (J MK M ji< •> ll I M Si 11 ifn h(!C,JU',( 1 of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums Does Your Blue Cross and Blue Shield Your Current Policy Provide? Coverage Through VFB Policy Coverage $5,000,000 Medical Coverage? Our plan provides up to $5,000,000 in lifetime benefits for covered services. An Annual Out of Pocket Limit | I MEH* *|| "'"jt | The Maximum you will personalty pay toward covered services in any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, {for option I) Dental Coverage Included |X Coverage for restorative and preventative dentistry. Mr l&aittEflflß HHBBHSJR Prescription Drug Card Just show your card at participating pharmacies for immediate coverage. I , . Supplemental ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

December 1992/ January 1993 Farm leader predicts limited ag policy By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director CHARLOTTESVILLE—There are far too many zeroes and commas attached to the national debt, and that fact will limit significant agricultural policy change under the new Clinton Administration, a U.S. farm leader predicted. With the national deficit growing by $300 million to $400 million annually, Richard Newpher, executive director of American Farm Bureau Federation's Washington office, said there isn't enough money to drastically change agricultural policy in 1993. ' Already, there is a $4 trillion debt. At some time that becomes reality," Newpher told Virginia Farm Bureau voting delegates Nov. 4 at the organization's annual Resolutions Meeting. "Limited funds will make him (Clinton) careful not to cause interest rates to go up. "That will limit any new initiatives. It will limit spending any new money. He must be cognizant that he can't cost jobs" by forcing regulations on b...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

14 WANTED—Crippted or downed cows, steers or buls. Rick Lewis, 804-352-5846 or 352-7352. REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE—BuIs, cows and open heifers. Cal 703-228-8496 or 228-2881. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD bulls, 12 months. Haytokah farm, Crewe, VA. Call 804-645-9580. PERFORMANCE TESTED ANGUS BULLS. BCIA sales. Tye Brook Angus, Paul Saunders Farm, 804-277-5455; Jim, 804-277-9133-THREE REGISTERED POLLED Hereford buls. Light birth weights. Service age (15 mos.). 703-886-1565. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD bulls with excelent bloodlines & good E.P.D.s. 703-382-2050. FOR SALE—A Jersey cow. Cana, VA. Call 703-755-4286. TWO PUREBRED YEARLING grey Simmental buls available. Tom Clark, Wythevie, VA. Ptease cal 703-228-4407. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS. Breeding age. Cal 645-9193 or 645-9580. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN service age buls. Also open and bred females. 703-825-0590. REGISTERED FULLBLOOD SIMMENTAL cows, heifers and buls. Top bloodlines. 703-873-5557. REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

December 1992/ January 1993 increase in 1993 RICHMOND—For the first time in more than two years, display and classified advertising rates in the Form Bureau News will increase. The change will take effect Jan. 1, but regular advertisers were notified of the increase at the end of November. A need to offset the ever-increasing costs of mailing and printing the membership's newspaper was the main reason for raising the rales, according to Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Communications Director Greg Hicks. Display advertising rates for members will increase only 5 percent and the rates for outskk; advertisers will increase 15 percent Members will still receive one ad will cost 20 cents per word for members instead of the current 15 cents per word. Non-members will begin paying 30 cents—s cents more than current rates. feel that the Farm Bureau News has been offering affordable, well-read advertising space for many years, 'said Hicks, "Inorder to continue providing a readership more tha...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1992

We Do Best, AUTO • HOMEOWNERS • LIFE (804) 788-1234 Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company Early Settlers Insurance Company Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company I Southern Farm Bureau Annuity Insurance Company 200 West Grace Street Box Richmond, Virginia 23261 \mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrnmm 1993 Legislative 2 Cash Back 5 1992 Convention 7-1 0 Insurance Q&A 13 Priorities r Highlights Learn how Farm Bureau Commonly asked VFBF President C Wayne members can save money Colorful photos and stories insurance questions are Asbwortb explains this on new Dodge wagons and fill these four pages with answered in this new year's legislative priorities. trucks. highlights of VFBF' s 67th column. Annual Convention.

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

Vol. 52, No. 1 VFBF voting delegates gave input on AFBF policies From AFBF and VFBF reports ANAHEIM, Calif —A total of eight Virginia Farm Bureau Federation voting delegates gave their input on some of the 168 policies approved during the American Farm Bureau Federation's 1992 Annual Convention here, Jan. 9-14. Virginia voting delegates included VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth of Pittsylvania County, VFBF Vice President Bruce Hiatt of Carroll County, Paul Anderson of Frederick County, Tommy Jenkins of Nottoway County, Marvin Barker of Halifax County, Robert Bloch of Albemarle County, William Purcell of Charlotte County, and Bruce Richardson of Northampton County. Alternate was Clay Lawrence of Wythe County Anderson spoke out in favor of private property rights for farmers and Jenkins proposed that noxious weed control be mandatory on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. Farm Bureau women also played a role. Attending as voting delegates for the AFBF Women's Committee were VFBF...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1993

2 Farmers like deer, just not the destruction they cause The term "deer" has truly become a four-letter word to many Farm Bureau members, especially those who own farms and land. But before I make any animal lovers turn red in the face, let me explain why farmers and landowners are upset. It's not because we don't like deer. Like any lover of nature —and farmers most certainly love nature —we appreciate the variety of wildlife we are blessed with in the Old Dominion. Deer are gentle, graceful and beautiful. The problem is, there are far too many of them. And the overpopulation of any species creates food shortages and other problems. So deer, facing a natural food shortage in the woods, take to our crops— especially soybeans and alfalfa. They also ravage corn fields, fruit trees and Christmas tree seedlings. They even pull up and eat tobacco plants and backyard suburban shrubbery. One of our members in Pittsylvania County says he must pick cantaloupes while they are still green to b...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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