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Title: Grenville Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Wolfram, Molyboenite, &c. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 July 1915

By GEORGE D. ME CI DELL, Since the war began there has been a shortage of wolfram, molybdenite, scheel ite, bismuth and manganese in Europe, mainly because the trade in them was conducted by enemy countries. They are all most useful in the industries con nected with steel-making and ship building. Lately the Imperial Institute of London made an appeal to. various representative bodies throughout Aus tralia to help to put producers of any of these minerals in touch with the manu facturers of iron and steel. Wolfram and scheelite, the chief ores of tungsten, contain tungstic acid, much used in hardening. From molybdenite, molyb denic acid for hardeuing steel is derived. Along with bismuth and moljbdenum, these two minerals are generally found in association with gold. Their value has increased enormously, and though the prices are erratic, the following may be taken as near the mark Wolfram, £145 a ton ; molybdenite, £700 a ton ; scheelite, £100 a ton ; bismuth, £250 a ton. Manganese ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOLDIER'S TRIPLET BOYS. "Kitchener," "French," and "Jellicoe" in Incubators. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 July 1915

SOLDIER'S TRIPLET BOYS. "Kitchener," "French," and "Jellicoe" in Incubators. What will a soldier at the front say when he hears the news that his wife has given birth to triplets, all boys, at a village called Pallion, near Sunderland? They are bonnie little babies, too, although they were born prematurely. Directly the happy event took place the triplets were hur ried off to the Children's Hospital for special care and treatment. There they were placed in the baby incuba tors, and are thriving splendidly un der their novel conditions. As be comes a patriotic home, they have been christened Kitchener, Jellicoe, and French. Exaggeration is neither thoughtful, wise, nor safe. It is a proof of the weakness of the understanding, or the want of discernment of him that utters it; so that, even when he speaks the truth, he soon finds it is received with suspicion or utter unbelief. It is easy to be careful of the feel ings of those about whom we care little. Should we not do as much for th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 July 1915

SPEAKS OF THE WORTH OF So III his frlend3 scarcely knew film and he went to the Melbourne Hospital. A friend recommended Clements Tonic, and that saved him This letter has been recorded because of its great ernestness, and the Vvay the writer, Mr. Holliday, expresses his sufferings and recovery. It shows what Clements Tonic can do. Mr. Holliday writes from his business address, 113 Madeline Street (Bakers Patent Peel Factory), Gar!ton, Melbourne, 19/5/1 f, CLEMENTS TONIC LTD., " I am glad to tell you what Clements Tonic did for me. A year ago I was so ill from bad liver and nervonsnesa. I blamed overwork, and a rash of orders. To beep easterners supplied I worked day and night, with the result 1 got so ill I could take no part in the busineso czcept ■ supervise. To give an idea how ill and changed I was, people who had not seen me for months would pass and not know me. I was for five months like this, gradually getting worse. Good advice - and medicine did me no good. I decided to g...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling & Motoring. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 July 1915

A couple of years ago he would have j been a brave man who predicted such popularity for the light car, as it at presept enjoys. At that time contro versy was rife regarding the comparative merits of the oycle car and the light car, and the latter was supposed to have only a very restricted future before it. But it has won all along the line, and the number of makes at present on the market is being added to constantly. In fact, the type has come into its own, as the car for the moderate motorist, and there are'indications that although progression may. be made in design. and fitment it will remain distinct. At. the present time, when everyone is studying the question of economy the utility of the light car appeals to a wider circle of motorists than ever before. Its sphere of utility is no longer confined to those who are owners of light cars alone, For these handy little vehicles are now found to occupy a very useful, position as runa bouts, in many homes where larger cars are als...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Smythesdale News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 July 1915

Father J. Heueban, of Smytbesdale, has enlisted "for the front, and has passed his medical examination. Father Henehan is said to be a fine rifle shot and a keen sportsman. Messrs R. Talbot, R. Boyd, and A. Gould have been successful in passing the medical examination in Melbourne. These lads are members of the local rifle clab. They are good shots : R. Boyd be ing the champion shot in the club, hav ing secured the markman's badge se veral years in succession. The faet of these recruits having been accepted will be an inducement to others to join.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Snake Valley News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 July 1915

0 Last week we referred to the death in action of Sapper Harold Baxter, of this town. The following particulars of the young soldier's career will be of interest:—Harold E. Baxter was the second youngest son of Mr J. H. Bax ter. He was born at Ingliston, and was 23 years of age in April last. He was edu cated at the local school under Mr Hy land, where he gained his certificate of merit at a very early age. He was always a regular attendant at school, and for upwards of five years he attended with but one holiday's break. He was just fifteen when he entered the Railway service in the Clerical Branch. He was first stationed at Windsor for a shoit. time, aiid was then transferred to Cam perdown, and afterwards to Balaclava, and from there to the Metropolitan : Superintendent's Office, Railway build-j ings, Flinders -street. He was a certifi- ' cated short-hand writer, telegraph operator, and typist, and was advanced in telegraph engineering. He left with 2nd>:0ompany of Field Engin...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
No Hurry. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

No Hurry. A story is being toltf Mr. F M. Burgess, vice-president ana general manger of the Mountain Staxe Tele phone and Telegraph Company, of Denver, Avho was making an automo bile tour of inspection through south ern Utah. That State employs some of its convicts in the c nstruction of roads. While on a narrow road the auto-party stopped at a shallow creek, which they were about to ford, to put water in the radiator, and so on. A convict, hauling a load of crush ed stones, pulled up behind them'. The chauffeur being delayed a bit, Mr. Burgess turned to the convict and apologetically said— "We'll pass on in just a moment." "Oh, no hurry!" the convict placid ly replied. "I've got twenty years."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MEDICAL MEMS. Diet in Anaemia, [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

MEDICAL MEMS. Diet in Anaemia, The problem of the proper diet for the anaemic girl is a rather trouble some one. Very often the girl likes and demands the food she 'ought not to have, and dislikes the kind that would do her most good. That dis position must be overcome with firm kindness. It is a good plan to ex plain the reasons that justify the treatment; an intelligent patient will then understand why she ought to sun mit to it. That is why a sensible and plain-spoken physician can often help a case in which a parent has failed. The girl who is anaemic is almost certain to crave a good deal for sugar and starchy food, although she can not digest such food properly. On the other hand, she is likely to show a positive dislike for the milk and meat—the fats and the nitrogen— that her condition demands. The need in anaemia is not for a great quantity of any kind of food, but for plenty of the kind that can be easily digested and assimilated. What that food is can only be determined b...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE LION'S CUBS. Who Dares to Touch the Homeland?? [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

THE LION'S CUBS. i/Vho Dares to Touch the. Homeland?? Fou will find a wild commotion, over land and over ocean, From the Great Australian Bight to Hudson Bay; A.nd if you ask the reason you'll be told that war's in season, And the Lion's cubs are arming for the fray. You will hear, 'mid cannon's thunder, of the German Kaiser's blun der ; For he thought the cubs would never leave their play. So the Lion's days were numbered, while the cubs so sweetly slum bered; And the Kaiser planned and plot ted for The Day. And when The Day was dawning, ■without notice, without warn ing, The German host was launched against their prey; And then there was a growling, for the Lion's cubs were howling, For they, too, had been preparing for The Day. And now from woods Canadian, from farms and hills Arcadian, From veldt and bush, where'er the British roam, They're gathering for the fight 'gainst the German Kaiser's might, For the Lion's cubs have heard the call from Home. Ne'er shall England's flag be ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SPORTSMAN AND SPY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

SPORTSMAN AND SPY. In an account of Iris personal ex periences as a spy—who is "not necessarily a base and despicable fel low; . lie is often both clever and brave'' —Lieutenant-ijeneral Sir Robert Bad en-Powell describes how, while osten sibly out for sport, he obtained valu able information as to Germany's se cret preparations for war— "Some years ago a report came to | the War Office that a foreign Power was making gun emplacements in a ; position which had not before been suspected of being of military value, j and they were evidently going to use it for strategical purposes. "I was sent to see whether the re port was true. Of course it would not do to go as an officer—suspicions would be aroused, one would be al lowed to see nothing, and Avould prob ably be arrested as a spy. I therefore went to stay with a friendly farmer in the neighborhood and went out shooting every day among the par tridges and snipe which abounded there. The first thing I did was to look at the country ge...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORLD'S RICHEST CHURCH. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

WORLD'S RICHEST CHURCH. Trinity Church., New York, which, has just voted a handsome donation , to the Preservation Fund of St. j Paul's Cathedral, is the most richly endowed parish in the -world. It has a fast-increasing income—not fully disclosed, hut believed to he about £500,000 a year—which is mainly "unearned increment," derived from lands given by Queen Anne that have become priceless through the growth of the city during two centuries. Out of this vast revenue are paid the sti pends of the clergy and choirs of Trinity and of eight daughter chur ches, the expenses of Trinity Hos pital and Trinity Cemetery, and con tributions to poorer parishes and charitable • institutions. Some time ago Trinity "vestry" voted a sub scription towards the repair of the organ of Bow Church, Cheapside, and were delighted with two return gifts, which consisted of a Roman tile and a chunk of stone from the old Norman crypt.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Smythesdale News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

Messrs M. D. M'Menamin and P. Dalton, J.P., occupied the Bench at the local Court on Tuesday. One truancy case was dealt with, a fiue of 2s being imposed. The ladies' committee of the Rod Cross Society hare resolved to canvas the district to-procure funds for tlie pur chase of material requisites for the sol diers. The Misses Ford raffled an Aus tralian terrier during the week, and real ised 28s 9d. Miss B. Harridge wa3 the winner All the financial evidences would seem to point to tho fact that tho ^Jtate deficit for the financial year, which*" closed on 30th June, will be £1,250,000, instead of the one million estimated by the Treasurer (Sir Alexander Peacock) last December. Nothing definite will, how ever, be known on the matter until the end of July. In addition to the Acts that have been passed empowering extra direct taxation extending over four years, Ministers think that other means of raising the money will have to be re sorted to. This is interpreted to mean that there ia l...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE KAISER'S WITHERED ARM. An Amazing Artificial Limb. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

THE KAISER'S WITHERED ARM. I I An Amazing Artificial Limb. Various stories have been told of the ■ cause of the. Kaiser's infirmity—that withered leit hand and arm, which oust have caused the proudly sensi tive monarch many a painful reflec tion. Premature birth or doctor's care lessness are the most generally accept ed explanations, the real truth being, however, that the Kaiser's mother, the I Empress Frederick, was so exhausted at the birth that the doctors were - obliged at a critical moment to devote [ every attention to her, with the re sult that proper care was not exercised in regard to the infant. The nurse, Fraulein Stahl, who at tended the birth, tells a graphic story of the scene in the bedroom. "Such was the condition of the Kaiser's moth er at the time," she says, "that the doc tors really thought she was dying. I had to abandon the child momentarily to help them, and when—the Princess having revived after a little while— I knelt down before the couch on which the infa...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

For children's hacking cough at night, Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, la 6d

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN THEY SPLIT POLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

WHEN THEY SPLIT POLAND. The first partition of Poland was 1 actively commenced 142 years ago, un- j der the terms of a compact between Frederick the Great of Prussia and Catherine of Russia, in which Austria j was invited to take part. About one third of Poland was seized on this oc casion. The second partition, in 1793, and the third, in 1795, practically com pleted the dismemberment of the an cient kingdom, and after the congress of Vienna, a century ago, nothing was left of Poland but a memory. Before the first partition the kingdom stretch ed' from the Carpathians to the Baltic, a distance of 600 miles. It is to these original lines that the Czar has prom ised to restore Poland after the conclu sion of the present war. During the last century Germany, Austria ' and Russia alike have sought to stamp out the language, literature and national spirit of the Poles, but with little suc cess. The attempt to force school children to adopt the German tongue has resulted in many "strikes"...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EXPLAINING THE WAR. In a Zeppelin. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

EXPLAINING THE WAR. In a Zeppelin. The chief impressicn produced by a voyage in a Zeppelin is one of over powering noise and intense exhilara tion. The noise of the Zeppelin pro ceeds from the roaring of her four gigantic propellers and also from the detonations of her petrol engines, of which in the newest type four each of 200 h.p. are carried. Attempts have been made in h 5, one of the very lat est", to apply silencers; but if report is to be trusted the noise is still ex cessive even when the observer is on the earth and the airship is high up in the air. The movcur-.ent when the airship as cends is precisely like that of a rapid I lift rushing up to the top of a sky- j scraper. In fine weather there is no unpleasant swaying or sea-sickness. The movement is swift and even. The crew of the airship are accommodated in two long gondola-shaped cars. The newest naval Zeppelins of the pattern of L 5 and L 6 now engaged in patrol wor.t in the North Sea are about 52511. long and 50ft. i...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SINCE BABY'S GROWN UP. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

! SINCE BABY'S GROWN UP. I (William Allen White, a well-known I American journalist, and editor of the I "Emporio Gazette," recently ran a "For Sale" advertisement in. his [ paper, offering his daughter's STiet | land pony for sale, the oifer being made because the young lady had j outgrown the pony. The following poem, written for the occasion, will touch a responsive chord in the heart of many parents.) j For sale, a Shetland pony, by William | Allen White; ! A pet, kind, gentle, city broke, has long been the delight Of William Allen's little girl, who j now has grown so old And big and pretty that the pony's : going to be sold. It seems, so Papa William thinks, so short a time ago That this same pony "fit the kid"— then she began to grow. Her baby ways seemed, all at once, to vanish, and in place Of "A, B, ab," and "two times two" were questions grave to face. The pigtails changed into a crown of hair around her head. The dresses lengthened, and one day her loving mother said Tha...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE KNITTING SONG. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

THE KNITTING SONG. Soldier lad, on the sodden ground, Sailor lad on the seas, Can't you hear a little cricketty sound Stealing across on the breeze? It's the knitting needles singing their song, As they twine the khaki or blue, Thousands and thousands and thou sands strong, Tommy and Jack, for you. Click—click—click! How they dart and flick, Flashing in the firelight to and fro! Nor for purl and pain, Round and round again, Knitting love and luck in every row. The busy ha,nds may be rough or white, The fingers gouty or slim, The careful eyes may be youthfully bright, Or they may be weary and dim. Lady and work girl, young and old, They've all got one end in view, Knitting "warm comforts . against the cold, Tommy and Jack, for you. Click—click—click! How they dart and flick, Flashing in the firelight to and fro! Nor for purl and pain, Round and round again, Knitting love and luck in every row. Knitting away by the midnight oil, Knitting when day begins, Lads, in the stress of your sp...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ABOUT BERLIN. Sidelights on the Kaiser's Capital. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

ABOUT BERLIN. I I Sidelights on the Kaiser's Capital. Berlin policemen are the best edu cated in the world. Those stationed in important thoroughfares have a knowledge of several languages, and flags of the nations on their sleeves indicate what foreign tongues they speak. Potsdamer Platz, one of Berlin's widest thoroughfares, is' so wide that ^most {people {travel from one side to the other by taking the under ground railway. Berlin abounds with picturesque parks, where the inhabitants ride, walk, and play games. Every seat is marked, some for children, others for invalids, amd private chairs can be hired for a season. A monthly season-ticket can be ob tained for the Berlin tram-cars, which has to bear the owner's portrait. With this pass a citizen can ride all day long on all the different street-cars for a month for about 5/ Elevated railways are a feature of Berlin. Every compartment is mark ed, there being a special carriage for those who have dogs, for those who have bundles, ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GAMBLER. Dramatic Story of a Woman's Dishonesy—for Her Husband's Sake. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 17 July 1915

THE GAMBLER. Dramatic Story of a Woman's Dishonesy—for Her Husband's Sake. By A. G. Greenwood. Lord Whitwell stalked into the in nermost sanctum of Whitwell, Stam ford and. Company's Bank in Leaden hall-street. John Stamford hustled in, a sheaf of papers in his hand, a mo ment later. The two partners shook hands and plunged into business. Two hours later Whitwell exclaimed abruptly: "There's another thing I wanted to mention, John." Mr. Stamford sighed and glanced at the clock. Whitwell was always ver bose. Had he a story to tell he told it as though he were dictating a novel. It meant that the morning would be wasted. "Go on," he said meekly. Whitwell told him this: "I went to Twyford-cum-Edge on Saturday. A Roman bath had been discovered a mile or so out—on Ridge road. It wasn't till I'd nearly reached my destination that I remembered.that a young cousin of mine—Wenda was living there. She married Holbeclt, the manager of our branch there. By the way, Egbert Holbeck's doing very g...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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