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Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham An... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 9,755 items from Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Not Necessary. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

Not Necessary. A Lancashire landlady, whose repu tation for over-feeding her boarders was not great, brought in the supper tray, and alter she had set the vari ous items before the solitary boarder she said, "Shall I light the gas?" The lone one looked at the scanty meal before him, and replied, "Well, no..it isn't necessary-the supper is I Ilight enough."

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"My Mother's Eyes." [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

"My Mother's Eyes." A newspaper recently Invited its readers to state in a few words what they considered tile most beautiful thing In the world. The first prize was awarded to the -sender of the answer, "The eyes of my mother." "The dream of that which we know to be impossible," suggested an im;a ginative person, and this brought him second prize. But the most amusing thing was that which read- "The most beautiful thing in the world is to see a man carrying his mother-in-law across sa dangerous riv er without making any attempt to drop her in."

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Lesser Evil. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

The Lesser Evil. Briggs: You must have a lot of trouble keeping your wife dressed up in the height of style. Griggs: Yes, but it's nothing to the trouble I'd have if I didn't. Only thoseR who think of nothing have need of dfitrarction. We may all be born equal. bIlt don't try to force that theory on the mother of a first baby.

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRANGE COINCIDENCES Scientific and Literary Parallels. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

STRANGE COINCIDENCES Scientific and Literary Parallels. In the lives of most of us colnaci dence has played a part Probably nine out of every: ten peopie can re call events and dates which, co-incid ing with one another, are a source of wonderment -There are some cofnci dences, however, which are of such a character as to call for more than casual comment. In the November issue of the "Strand Magazine," for instance, there I- a photograph illustrating a phen omenon only visible in the tropics that of sanshine at noon when no sha dow is thrown by objects exposed to the sun's rays, the explanation being that the ship upon which the photo graph was taken was at the moment in the exact nadir of the sun's zenith. The penomenon was observed aid re corded by MIr. W. B. Gibbs in latitude 1t deg. South. Ia February of last year, and It is a singular colncidence that precisely the same phenomenon a-us witnessed In 1881 or 1882 by Cap tain W. 31. Gibbs, of Cardiff, at about the same time of th...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
If You See [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

If You See Father wearing a purple neckhte with pink dots and yellow stripes (on the tie, not on father), you may wager yuur hat that father doesn't want tI hurt mother's feelings. Your neIghbor put all the wlnduwu up and volumes of smoke pour out, it is a sIgn he had the nerve to smoke one of his hollday cigars in the house.

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCOURING CALVES. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

* SCOURING CALVES. From experiments carried out in Germany it Is claimed to have been discovered that sour milk given to calves from the irst to the fifth day of their lives; forms an excellent pre ventive of scour. The constant losses -sometimes of valuable pedigree calves-are well known in most herds, and are attributed to the curdling of the milk in the stomach. The bacteria in sour milk are supposed to act bene tficially. In Germany it is called yog hurt, produced by adding Bacillus bul garicus to milk. This generates lac tic acid in the stomach of the caives, which acts as a disinfectant, and pre vents the development of the hurt fuil bacteria, and at the same time sti mulates the activity of the intestine, probably by Droducing a ferment that destroys the bacilli which give rise to scoutr.

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIAN DAIRYING. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

AUSTRALIAN DAIRYING. Within the past ten years the dairy cows of Australia have increased from one million to above two millions. The butter produced in a single year reach ed about 200,000,000 lbs. The annual export is valued at between £3,000,000 and £4,000,000. No rural industry in Australia Is more progressive and none pays larger returns to the farmers. The mainstay of dairying Is the e cport n-arket, and easily the largest con sumers of Australian butter abroad are the people of the United Kingdom. It might be thought that the expense of carrying butter from Australia to London would be a serious handicap upon butter-making in the Common wealth. As a matter of fact, however, the Australian dairy farmer, in point of cost, is as close to London as the dairy farmers of Ireland or Scotland. The actual contract price of shipping butter from either Melbourne or Syd ney to London is 4d. per lb.

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. CULLING OUT POOR COWS. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

DAIRYING. CULLING OUT POOR COWS. An English dairying authority says: The elimination of the worthless ani mals should be one of the chief ob jects of the cow keeper. Milk records kept carefully and sys tc-matically furnish reliable informa tilon which enables a cow keeper to de tect these worthless animals; and it pays him to dispose of them at once. There are some farmers, of course. who nay be tempted to rely wholly on their own judgment as far as the milking capacities of any cow Is con cerned; but guess-work of this kind can teach nothing what it costs to feed cows, nor whether such food is being economically fed in relation to the average quantity of milk produced. Milk producers need to study this question of cost of food in relation to milk yield very carefully indeed. The fact is clear that a cow giving, say, SO0 gallons per annum costs practic ally no more to feed than one which only gives 600 gallons; yet, compara tively speaking, there is a loss of £6 on the latter, if th...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
It Reminds 'Em. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

It Reminds 'Em. A great man once said to a friend: "I think I'll write my recollections." "Very good," said the friend, "but let me caution you not to recollect anything about celebrities that are living." "Why, what's the danger, anyway?" "The dangerL replied the other, "hr that is soon as you begin to recollect things about living celebrities they will begin to recollect things about you."

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Insufferable. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

Insufferabie. "So you broke your engagement with him?" "Yes." "What for?" "He's a conceited thing. I sfmply couldn't stand himb" "I never heard him brag, What makes you think him conceited?" "All the time we were engaged he never once told me that he was un worthy of my love."

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WARTS ON TEATS. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

WARTS ON TEATS. Many people fail to get rid of warts because they think It can only be done with great dificulty, or by tearing the wart bodily away, but this is not the case. When cows are milked twice a day it does not seem to afford much opportunity to get rid of warts. To use any substance of a poisonous nature for the wart Is dangerous In many ways. When the teats are chapped only, some kind of soothing ointment should be applied, and for this pur pose carbollsed vaseline, and other preparations may be procured from the chemist This will heal the teat up in a short time, and allow the milk ing to be carried on without any dis comfiture to the cow. in the case of warts, when small they can generally be got rid of by touching them with caustic soda. An other simple remedy, and one which in many cases has been found to be successful; rub the wart with vinegar, then while It is still wet dust It with dry carbonate of soda. If this is done after each milking, the warts will graduall...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GENERAL CARE AND FEEDING. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

GENERAL CARE AND FEEDING. No branch of dairy farming is more important than the feeding and treat ment of cows; yet none is more gen orally neglected. The direct influence of what the cow eats and drinks upon the milk she produces cannot be too strongly impressed upon the attention of the farmer. Of equal importance are the conditions under which food and drink are taken. If cows are chased by dogs or over-driven, or wor ried by boys on their way to pasture, their milk will surely show the effects in a deterioration of quality. If their shelter in winter or shade in summer is insufficient, or the food Is not suf ficiently nutritive, the penalty will In variably be paid in a smaller milk yield. These restrictions are inevi table. One of the greatest mistakes far mers make is in supposing that they may with impunity keep their cows on "short commons" during the win tar and that they will fatten up in the spring, and milk as well as ever. A cow reduced to meagreness by semi starvatlon ...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VETCHES OR TARES. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

VETCHES OR TARES. Vetches or tares are of two distinct kinds--those sown in the autumn for spring or early summer use, and those sown In the spring which come in alter the winter sowing is used up. There are few crops which yield such a large amount of succulent green food, though perhaps for special pur poses other crops are preferable, but for general use and under all condi tions tares cannot be beaten. The amount of seed required per acre is about three bushels of tares and one bushel of oats or rye, the litter being sown to keep the tares off the ground somewhat and so prevent rotting in wet weather. In order to gain the full benefits from growing this green crop the sow Ings should be made at different inter vals, beginning as early as possible, when the land can be prepared, so that succeslsive.cuttings are obtained without allowing them to become ripe. Tares are more suitable for soiling purposes than grazingas this latter plan is very wasteful, much of the food being trampl...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BUSY BEE. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

THE BUSY BEE, Winter is close upon us. In the coolest of our districts bees have al ready retired, and before the mont is out the retirement will be general. During the warmer portions of the days, especially it the sun is bright, the bees will still venture out, but they will not wander far from home it last month's advice has been u* tended to, i.e., if they are supplied with sufficient honey to carry them on till spring, or the coming breeding season. If bees are forced to go for aging on bright winter days, the sud den atmospheric changes prevent the return of many, and a good supply of food in the hive is the only remedy. I also forms one of the best methods to keep up the warmth of the hive. On every occasion when the weather is bright and drying, remove the wraps, etc., from the hives, and spread them out to dry. External dampness produces internal dampness, which Is one of the most prolific causes of di sease. Just before sundown retulrn the protectfons to the hives. The eve...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How the Horse Won. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

How the Horse Won. A few day: after the new fIrmor hard purcrha.d :a horse from a tlhrlfT:y Scot h Tretfurnod in ain ang:y mood. "5 'Y: *, me thlls horne had won halft:-dozln nmatche- agninot some of 3be, heot horsc; in tile coluntry. Ife can't trot a mlt: in six minultes to -nve to!moclf. You Ilci to me!" ho de nolnriced. "I dldna !!e. It was In Bloughig matches he toolk eox DrizOO calmry rer?le4 Sa?Qirlry.

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WINTER CARE. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

WINTER CARE. The season is at hand that is the hardest on our ever faithful friend the horse. The raw, damp, windy or extreme cold weather, together with a little neglect, may cause the loss of a valu able horse. When a horse comes in wet from work or drive, rub him well and cover with a warm woollen blanket. Always change to a dry blanket' when the horse has cooled. Rub the legs well with a wisp of straw or a towel. Every horse is more or less wargn when he comes in from a drive. Never strip off the harness or saddle and let the horse rush into a feed of oats or a trough of water. Never give water or oats to a horse until he has been in the stable some time, and has had some hay, This is a sane and safe practice and much loss can be avoided by en. forcing it. Chang~e the hit of the horse with tile sensitive mouth. Take off the checi., or let it out. Try a large rub. hercovered bit. If the horse "drives on one line." look to his tooth at once; a sharp tooth i ul:sually the cause.

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. If you want to heat a flat-iron in your room, a tin plate oser the gas-jet will enable you to heat the iron twice as quickly. Scorch-marks on linen may Ibe re moaed by rubbing iresh-cut onion,. the garment being afterwards soaked in cold water. To stop hiccup, give the patient it tenapoonful of granulated sugar anl 7itnehark I hIs dloes not afford iistant relief, repent the dose. When boiling anly kinid of greens., use sugar in place of noai.. nhi bi gives the greens a ntulh letter fli hour, but they then reqillire a litrhe longer rooking. 'Pi, keepl the white oi an eye fr-n. leaving the yolk no.1 nCatterritt about in the water, tak.- a spoo and stit tha.water rllpiiln rn...l for a -few seconds, thmen drop the '.p gintly Inl tIhe "htle" in te I ettr. of tile whirlpool furnmel tl teil rapid cIrcular mnl,ti tin the . r, Bait up nuicrklv for thr.-e ;,r,,,' Ti Cook foreign-rn, so.i thetrln,;ttmm I l int1i..or tin fryd, inn - try eggsn, trifttn po hli* fio ooll l itt I ....

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Nursery Chair. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

.A Nursery Chair. This nursery chair is such a simple contrivance andl so very useful that the wonder is no one thought of it till now. A woman has the credit of inventing it. -The chair is fitted with two drawers to contain all that is necessary in dressintg baby. The drawers are divided into co?n partments to hold the safety pins, powder puff, handkerchiefs, brush and comb, feeding utensils, andi odds and ends which every mother likes to have handy for baby's toi lIt. There is ..o do'blt this device wohid greatly -iS lify the onme what trying ,',era;tion of dressinga fractious b, ita, d l save. nurse or mnother rtmuch unnecessary trouble. The nursery chair is. no simple of constrtuctioln that there isno re.t - soil wh.y a handy tmian should not adnat one for household use out mt a. colltnmon kitchent chair, olme of the square, solid, old-fashioned kind. It will he found adlvantageous to cut short the legs of the chair, to enable the mothr to stoop more easily while hathing hably.<...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
In Abraham's Country. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

In Abraham's Country. The journey from Beirut to Alep po. scarcely longer in point of mile age than fromn London to Manches ter. took t us nineteen holurs. A good-natured Turkish oficer shared the compartmient, and helped to en liven the way, as well as to keep undesirables from trsvellinig with Ius. Beyond Hamn, on the riser Orontes. we could see several of the high water wheels which are used to raise water fromn the river to the high ground on either side. 'Lhese naurn. as they are called, are of huge di nlensions, some of them nearly it feet in diameter. As the wheel passes through the water, small boxes are flledl with the fluid, and. when they reach the top they empty their contents into a trough, from which the water is dlirected into the necessary channels, Night and day these wheels turn, and are only to hie stopped by diverting the force of the water below into another cours.. Altogether, it is a curious examlile of Syrian engineering, anld tlh, creaking of the wheels, tog...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Airship Travelling. [Newspaper Article] — Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette — 29 April 1914

Airship Travelling. C'aptain C. M. Waterlow. of the Royal Flying Corps, states that a new material has recently Iteen dis covered for manufacturing the gas envelopes of airships. It practically ,tliminates the leakage ct gas. The secret of its manufacture cannot e I discovered by examination or analy sis. This material, says our author ity, will make the airahip. a feasibloe cormmerial proposition as a pam senger-carrying vehicle. lIe prophe sles that airships running regularly between London: and I'aris will carry fifty passengers, and do sixty miles an hour with ease anIl cfngort. As passengers pass through the turnstiles to the airship, we are told, their weight 'will he recordted. Those dover 1:3 stone w'ouhl hare t, pay excess. -Consequently.v gentlemlmen near the limit would ditscord coats and wraps, and give them to their lighter frienlds. All Englamln wonu~tl be furnished .with lightthoutses'--the white upper light wouldl be the county one, and the htwcr red lightt woulmi in...

Publication Title: Berwick Shire News And Pakenham And Cranbourne Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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