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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AMERICAN HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

AMERICAN IIOI OUR. Running Low. "Why .in: you ia sufh .1 hurry f<»r the new <urioncy?" "The litilr M'|i|)ly that i had of th» old ja almost exhausted." Moro In It.Griggs: "J hale to play poker with a hard loser." Briggs: "It's ;i hanged sight better than playing it with an easy winner." • # • # • In the Sho Class.—Jack: "I soe by tjii.s paper that a ship's life is twenty five yours." Joe: "Well, you know, the other 'fiheV novel1 go beyond twenty-eight years." *«.•«# One Drawback.—"Can we get the public's money with this proposition?" "Just liko taking candy fr&m a baby." "I don't liko that simile, A baby often puts up a very unpleasant how).'* #««•*« Mothers Try This-—Conductor: "Madam, that child looks older than throe years/' Mother: ''Yes, indeed he docs, con* ductor. That child has had a lot of trouble." ♦ « # « Worth Keeping, Anyhow.—"You have some remarkable paintings." "Yes," replied Mrs. Cumiox. "The art dealer said they were old masters, but to...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SMALLPOX CERM IS FOUND. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

SMALLPOX CERM IS FOUND. Dr. Fornet, a Herlin scientist, claims to have discovered and isolated the germ oF smallpox. This elusive mi crobe is so infinitesimal a protozoan that for decades it has passed through the most minuio filters and escaped tlie clo.sest scrutiny of trained micro scopists. Not only lias he found the germ but he is able to propagate it, he asserts. If this be true it will he possible now to secure lymph for vaccination without, inoculating cattle with the smallpox virus, thus producing a puro culture. It is expected that this will eliminate many of tlio un pleasant and risky effects of vaccina ination as now carried on. Strictly the new process of inoculation cannot bo called vaccination, for the word "vac cine" comes from tho Latin word moaning cow.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
From Ashes to ledine. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

From Adhos to lodlno. During1 the spring months, when even the weather is dry enough to per mit of it, there appear all along the narrow coastal plain of the Jaedereri, Stavanger, Norway, what seem to be continuous lines of bonfires. The peasant farmers who are fortunate enough to own riparian rightfi are burning large piles of seaweed. Fur ther north, along the fiords, boatmen cut the seaweed much as grain would be cut by a scythe, and on the shores of the Jaedercn it grows luxuriantly, and in spring the root tentacles arc loosed and the weed is washed ashore by the waves. It is spread out like hay to dry, raked together, and permitted to burn until there remain only the ashes. Transportation facilities arc taxed to the limit of their capacity during the height of the season. The ashes arc exported for the manufacture of iodine.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STONE BLIND. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

STONE BLIND. Proudly he walked up to his be trothed, and drew from his pocket a small morocco ease. Opening it, ho took out a riii!;—a single diamond— and placed it on Ijer tapering fingor. She looked at it. "It's very small!" she said, and paused. Then: "And not very brilliant, either!" Poor fellow ! His smile vanished ; but, quickly recovering himself, lie laughed and said : "Ah, sweetheart, but lovo is blind!" Raising her limpid oyos to his. she said: " Yos. dear, but not stone blind I"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Bridal Veil. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

Tho Bridal Veil. A rclic of the bridal canopy held over the heads of the bride and bride groom, the bridal veil—is evidently of Eastern origin. Among the Anglo Saxons a similar custom existed, but if the bride was a widow it was dis pensed with. According to Sarum usage, a fine linen cloth was laid upon the heads of the bride and bridegroom, and was not removed until the Bene diction had been said. The old British custom was to use Nature's veil un adorned—that is, the long hair of the bride, which was worn by all brides. Royal, noble, and simple. Only then did everyone behold the tresses of maidenhood in their entirety and for the last time, as after marriage they were neatly dresBed on the head. Among some the tresses were cut and carefully stowed away on a woman be coming a wife. It was customary in Russia for village brides to shear their locks on returning from church.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BEET JUICE FOR LONG LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

BEET JUICE FOR LONC LIFE. One of tho most interesting dis coveries of recent research by tho Japs is tho value of tho red garden boot. Tho Japanese lovo tho beet, and de clare it contains that which will pro duce long life in tho human rnco. Thov tell us tho beet is full of iron and othor substances which will net on tho human system when administered as a tonic. Tho beets aro cut up and boiled for several hours when they aro re moved from tho water, nnd then tho liquor is boiled down until it becomes a syrup, This is taken in dosei ranging from a small wine-glass to cine-half a pint, two or three times a day, usually before the person eats a good meal. , This is pronounced by some of tho best physicians as one of tho most effectual tonics that can bo taken. Largo doses, such as a half-pint at a time is dcclarod by tho Japanese to be a preventative and a euro for gra vel of the kidneys and bladder. It should bo taken until relief is certain, which is said to come in a few days. •

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Shakespearean Misquotation. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

Shakespearean Misquotation. It is curious how Shakespeare quota- | tions get misapplied and how the mis application persists. An instance is i given in the .'-'New York Times." The quotation referred to is the very fam iliar one, "One touch of nature makes the whole world kin." Now, it occurs in the bitterly ironical "Troilus and Cressida,' and its real meaning- is per sistently twisted the wrong- way, for the verse is not complimentary to humanity. Ulyssi'.1. >vhen he speaks of "one touch of nature," describes a common habit of human being to for get past favours, neglect old heroes, and worship new idols; but read the verse yourself, and you will see: "One touch of nature makes the whole ' world kin, That all with one consent praise new born gawds, Though they arc made and moulded of things past, And give to dust that is a little gilt More laud than gilt o'er-dusted."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COSTLY HANDKERCHIEFS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

COSTLY HANDKERCHIEFS. Somo tiirio boforo his death tlio -Marquess of Anglesey piiiclmscd lliruo dozen handkorhiofs i'or evening dress wear. Tlioy wore of puro whit-o linon, with his crost worked in lminan hair in tlio cornoru. Tlieso handkerchiefs caino from Switzerland, and cost twolvoguinoas a dozen. It is intorostiny to know tliat tlio lato Due d'Albo uncle of tlio ex-Em press Eugenie, was in tlio habit of ordering twolvo dozon handkerchiefs at a time for which ho paid twenty guineas a dozon. I'orhops tlio most expensive hand korchiof in existonco is in tlio possess ion of tlio Italian Itoyal Family. It took threo wotnon 111010 than live yeara to raako, and is valued at £0,000. One of the Bulgarian princes lias tho poauliar hobby of collecting- dress ing gowns. His wnrdrobo contains an enormous number of theso aiticlos of apparel, many of which are worth £100 enolv. Somo timo ago lie had a drossing-gowu specially mado for liiin in Paris, for which lie paid £120. The Gaekwnr of Ba...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Monument to Adam. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

A Monument to Adam. This monument erected to the "me mory of Adam, the first man," is the only one of its kind in America, and probably in the world. It was erected in 1909 by Mr. John P. Brady, a builder, of Baltimore, at his country place, "Hitkory Ground," near Gar denville, in the no$h-castern suburb of Baltimore, Maryland. It is com posed of stone, bronze, and cement, and is surmounted by a very large and accurate sun-dial, especially calcu lated and constructed for the latitude in which the monfiment is erected. N. I.at. 39deg\ 20min. Surrounding the hour figures, in a circle on the dial, is the motto, "Sic transit gloria mun di" (so passes the glory of the world), and the date, 19(1!). and on other side of the shaft is a sunken panel with sunken letters, the two reading:— "This, the first shaft in America, W erected to the memory of Adam, the first man." The monument has naturally attracted much attention. Mr. Brady stated, in a newspaper interview, that "where so many others...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEW, ODD, INTERSTING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

nmw.odd, interesting Tliu inhabitants of South America cat serpents, lizards, and centipedes. Mlinlur among tile ancient [Vlsiuti:; wtuH not punislmblo nt the lirst ofionco. Nearly half tho population of Franco ia engaged in farming N'o roptiloa nro found in Newfound 1 [Villi - An olej/hunt sloops only fir# hours oacli day. Tho lifo of tho avorago lioreo in boudago ia twenty-fivo yenra; tlio wild horse's age is about thirty-eight years. In 1850 only ono woman worked for ivagos to ovory ton men; now tilo ratio is nne woman to four men. Tho uso of sights on cannon for aim ing did not commend itsolf until tlio beginning of tho last century. A solution of peroxido of hydrogen is gonornlly used to turn Lair to a golden huo. 1 A man respires, that is, draws in breath, sixteen to twenty times a min ute, or twenty thousand times a day. Gormany's first daily newspaper was j printed three hundred and eiglity ciglit years ago. Tho Chinoso have an academy of manners that prescribes etiquotto fo...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fish Hurled From Voloances. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

Fish Hurled From Voloanoos. Much wonder has been caused by the stories of fish being* thrown in large quantities from volcanoes when in eruption. Several case* of this strange occurrence have been known in recent years, especially in the West Indies. The explanation is said to be this: When a volcano becomes for a time in active—and it may remain bo for hun dreds of years—the crater is stopped up and filled with water. A lake is thus formed, which becomes peopled with fish reaching it from underground channels. As soon as the volcano wakes* into life the first thing that hap pens is that the whole lake is blown violently into the air by the steam and gases which escape from beneath it, and a perfect r.iJn of fish ?.«? the re sult.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ELEVATOR SERVICE IN THE NEW SKYSCRAPERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

ELEVATOR SERVICE IN THE NEW SKYSCRAPERS. Graded elevator service i.s the solu tion tor the transportation problem in skyscrapers thai is being developed in New York City, in a building ol* 35 to 40 stories, with a workday popu lation of 8,000 to 10,(KK) porsons, all arriving within 15 minutes of the «amo time in the morning and departing to gether in the evening, tho elevators must bo arranged sons to take each person to bis floor whether it is tho Gtli or 2Gth, in the same length of time and with a wait of not more than 130 seconds for a car. To do this, the elevators aro divided into groups, each group serving a. certain numbor of lloors and running at dilFeront speeds. In a 3G-story building now under con struction, there are to bo 48 elevators, divided into six groups of eight elo vators each, to handle the 8,300 occu pants. Ono group serves 10 floors,* from tho 2nd to tho lltli; another sorvos tho 12th to the 18th; another, tho 19th to tho 24th ; another, the 2jth to tho 30th; ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHEETS OF MICA INSERTED IN VEIL. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

8HEET8 OF MICA INSERTED IN. ' VEIL. For the woman motorist who does not feel comfortable wearing goggles, | but who dosirea protection for tlio eyoB. a specinl veil is now being manufac tured, which has a sheet of mica placed in a suitable positionfor protecting the eyes while allowing nn unobstructed view.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EARTH AS FOOD. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

EARTH AS FOOD. Among many strange food9 which the inhabitants of this world partake of, and consider delicacies, perhaps the strangest of all is earth. Vet there aro tribes, tho Lastians of Siam, who actually eat and unjoy earth. It lias never been discovered whore these pecu liar people contracted this habit, though it is generally believed that it prob ably camo about id the time of a: fa mine when there was nothing els^. to bo had. However, tho habit ha* now got such- a- hold upon then* that, old and young, rich and poor, alike indulge freely in its consumption. It is preferred when it has been ac quired from the vicinity of waters, so that it carries with it a taste of fish. It is made into a pasty substance and smothered into the ground in a hot lire. It can bo obtained at markets and at stores, and is served at dinners and at big functions of any description. In somo parts of tho Congo earth is sold in the shape of apples and oranges, and is given out in various colors—yellow,...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ANECDOTE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

THE ANECDOTE. "What is an anecdotc, Johnny?" asked the teacher. "A short, funny tale," answered the litilo follow. "Quito right," said tlio teachor. "Ami now, Johnny, you may write on t!ii' liliiikhoard a sentonco containing the word." Jnlmny hesitated a moment, and thou wrote: "A rabbit lias four legs ami ono imcedoto!",.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A KINDLY HINT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

A KINDLY HINT. Littles .Tames, while at a neighbour's, was given a pioco of broad and buttor, and |KiliU>ly said: "Thiuik you." "Unit's right, James," said the lady. "I like to hear little boys say 'thank you.' " "Well." ' rejoined James, 'if you want to hear mo say it again, you might put somo jam on it."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A GARDEN PARTY GAME. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

A CAR DUX PARTY GAME. AVhon you are giving a party to your littlo friends on a bright summer af ternoon in tho garden, this is a jolly game you can play, at tho samo time giving everyone a littlo present. First of all, you must make rather a largo hag out of coloured paper. Tins should then ho filled with num erous little gifts, penny toys and woo' colon rod paper hags filled with sweets do splendidly—and hung up at a con venient. hcigUt from tho branch of a - tree. Tlion each of your littlo guests should be given a pretty light wand— made of a piooo of cane or a' treo twig '—with coloured ribbon wound round it. Tho children are then blindfolded in turn and led somewhere nenr tho bag, and told to try and hit it and break tho paper. This isn't half as easy as it sounds, so each* child is allowed three trials. The player who has been clever enough to mako tho first hole in tho hag gets an extra prize, but all the rest of tho gifts aro shared amongst tho other guests, and each goes hom...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DRAWING WRONG INFERENCES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

DJiAH'hVG WRONG INFERENCES. Von may liavo heard this long ago, Iwi it is worth repeating: A i-ortnin king sent to another king, saying: "Send mo a bluo pig with a black tail, or else " Tho othor ro plied: "1 have not got ono, and if I had " For thoso words they went to war. After many men had been killed tlvoy wished for peace. But bo fore peace could bo got they had to ex plain tho words they had used. "What did you mean?" askod tho so eond of tho first, "by saying to nio. 'SoimI mo it blue pig with a black tail, in- (d«a ' " "Why," said tho other, "I meant a bluo pig with a black tail, or else some other colour. Hut what did you mean by 3aying to mo: 'I have not got ono, and if I bad —' " "That if I had ono I should have sent it." Both kings wero pleas ed, and peaco was mado. All quarrels are nearly as foolish as as the war about tho bluo pig with tho black tail.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BRIEF TRIUMPH. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

A BRIEF TRIUMPH. It was Ills first brief, and lie was determined to defend his client with hi$ last breath, if necessary. And now the •. critical stago of tho caBO had-, odmo. One of his witnesses was being examined by counsel for tho presocu tion: "I understand you called on tho plaintiff on the fifteonth. Is that so?" "That is so." ''And what conversation passed be tween you?" Beforo tho harassed witness could reply our friend jumped up and ob jected to the question being put, main taining that tho conversation could not bo admitted in evidence. A heated discussion followed, and, finally the Court was adjourned in order that the magistrate might como to a decision. Whon tho Court reassembled tho magistrate upheld counsel for tho pro secution, who, with a look of triumph, proceeded to put tho question: "Now, will you bo fiood enough to tell tho Court what conversation pass ed between you and the plaintiff whon you called on him?" "Pleaso, sir, the servant that opened the door told ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY A WOMAN CAN OUT-TALK A MAN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

WHY A WOMAN CAN OUT-TALK A MAN. 4 A. woman can talk lougor than a Hum, uiul doos so bueuuso sho uses up loss forco by a largo percentage than tho man does. A Gorman professor has proved by actual and very doli calo measurements that tho baritone singer use.s far inoro onor^y tlian tho tenor, and that tho bass* singer uhob moro forco than either. Tlio rango of voices differs greatly, so the por contugo varies to tlio same oxtont, but as a general result it was proved that tho touor uses only from ono sovonth to ono-sixLootith of tho lung power of tho baritone or bass. Tho difference botwoezi tlio forco uaod by tho contralto and tho soprano is quite marked, and Uio contralto who sings in vory (loop toxica usos at least ten times tho forco of tho thrilling so prano'. Tlio explanation is so siinplo that it is surprising that tho investigation was not made long ago. It has long boon kuown that tho tenor or soprano 1 brings tho vocal chords closo together and keeps tl»o edges only vibrati...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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