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Elephind.com contains 228,411 items from Cambridge Tribune, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 Advertisements Column 5 [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

GENERAL -:- CATERING. There ia no oharaoter of catering but what I am oompetent and prepared to do. As to prioes, they will always be reasonable; as to quality Of good*, it will always be the best to be had. M. R. JONES, Harvard Square.

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 9 Advertisements Column 6 [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

ICE CREAM. Orders Filled Tor Large or Small Quantities On week day*, holidays or Sundays. Delay in the dellveiy of orders is a very uncommon thing with us. Promptness our motto, M. R. JONES, Harvard Square.

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
H. William Tupper. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

H. William Tupper. Paclr Brothers' studio was established in Cambridge about ten years ago, on Cambridge street. From there II waa moved to lis present location on Main street. In 1883 the establishment was burned out. On the 15th of April in that year, Mr. H. W. Tupper, the present manager, took charge of It, and it has steadily growu from a small college business, open only a part of the year, to a business equal to any of the large studios In Boston. While the slock bills in '83 were only $15 to $20 a mouth, they are now from $300 a month upwards. Mr. Tupper, the manager, Is a Boston boy, born In 1840. He was educated at the Qulncy public school, and afterwards served an apprenticeship with Weeks A Potler in raan- ufacturing chemicals, a business tbat he did not like, and which he gave up in 1850. The next year be went Into the photographic studio of Sillsby, Case A Co. on Washington street, then the largest studio in Boston. He worked there for two years and a half, and then wen...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Horace G. Low. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

Horace G. Low. Low's dry goods store, 4(11) Harvard street, Is a mart well known to Cambridge ladles. It was MttblllbedUjf 1875 by Mr. C. 11. Low, who s..hi out to his brother, Horace (L, leven years ago, and went to St. Diego, California, to engage iv laud specula! inn. Th* reputation made for tbe establishment by Mr. C. 11. Low has been more than satisfactorily sustained by his successor, who can well Ire classed with the enterprising young business men of Old Cambridge, The Lowboys both came from Deny, N. 11., where they were brought up and went to school. C. 11. Low was for two seasons teacher of a district school and Horace was a pupil of his. When the former lirst opened his store in Harvard square, Horace was with him as clerk. HORACE 0, LOW

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Charles W. Sever. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

Charles W. Sever. The University book store iH one of the stores of Harvard square which dates buck almost lo the birlli rrf the book trade ill Huh city, and it, is flic one place nf business which the graduate of Harvard remembers with pleasure years after he has ceaaed to be a rending man. Nearly every new book of Importance publisher! in Kurntic or America finds ils way tn Severs, and some rrl the must celebrated men of letters were its customers foryears. The store started when Ihti publishing business was in ils infancy in America, and the earlier members of the firm are. still closely indcntilicd with the book interest in Boston. Mr. Sever has been connected with it since 1841). Ho came from Plymouth, Mass., In that year as a clerk for Mr. John Bartlott, who was then its proprietor, Tlie store was first, opened at. tbe corner of Boylston anrl Harvard streets, where the business was carried on for years; it was afterward removed to the corner of Holyoke Hired; it has occupied i...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Thomas H. Brewer. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

Thomas H. Brewer. When it Is stated that Mr. Thomas H. Brewer entered the provision business before hones were used here lv delivering orders, it would seem that he must be a very ancient individual, but after all tbat was only as far back as 1843. Mr. Brewer was born in East Cambridge in 1883. When a boy ten years old, he worked for Warren Flummer In the same business which he has since made bis life calling. At the age of twelve he was employed as general aide-de-camp at the Winthrop House on Arrow street, then run by Postmaster Samuel Newell and now owned 'ry Mr. Gordon McKay. While thus engaged he was taught bow to shout his young Ideas by Mr. Daniel Mansfield. Like his brother David, he was also at one time a roach boy on tbe "new line," as it was called, and afterwards became a driver. He afterwards worked a year for Mr. T. S. Hayes, a grocer, and then three years for Wood A Hall. In 1855 he started in the provision business for himself on Boylston, then called Brighton street...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
James Bolger. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

James Bolger. Mr. James Bolger of Palmer street li known in every part of Kailern Maaiachuset ti ss a successful hnrse-shoer. He has built up an extensive business as tbe result of his skill, enterprise snd Industry. He was born iv St. Johns, Newfoundland, and is the' seventh generation of blacksmiths iv the Bolger family. He was one of twelve chlhjre and learned his trade iv his father's shop. In 1883 he came to Cambridge, and was at first in charge of shoeing horses for the Union railroad, where he remained three years. Ambition then induced him to start in business for himself. He began with a partner named Sbechan in the basement of A. J. Jones's factory oil Palmer street. Three years later ho move I to Church sireet, aird three years later be built a shop on Mr. Pike's land on Palmer street. Jit; remain»d there about seven years, when, with the dollars be had accumulated, he bought the land where he is now located and built a two-story building, 42x4'! feet in dimensions. The s...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
J. W. Brine. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

J. W. Brine. One of the largest outfitting establishments in this country is that of Mr. J. W. Urine of this city The broadness of this statement may be exceplcd to by many people, but they are ready to be convinced, it is to be presumed. We think they will hear us out ill Ihe assert ion. however, when we say that Mr. Urine furnishes the uniforms for no less than a dozen colleges and some throe limes that number of organisations couneoted either with or outside of colleges. It will he interesting to know a few of these, perhaps, and as we have tbe data at hand, we cm give It readily. Among the clubs uniformed hy Mr. Ilrlnc are the Harvard 'Varsity and freshman baseball clubs, Harvard University and freshman crawl, Harvard '8!l Crew, Yale f.csh- man and University crews, Yale '80 FootHall Team. Williams College Bale-Ball Club, Tufts College Base-Ball Club, Massachusetts Institute of Technology FoolHall Team, Dartmouth Base-Bad Club, Brown Bale Ball Club, the Aiulover and Exeter base-...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
C. D. Wilder. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

C. D. Wilder. Mr. Wilder is ono of tbe broad-gauge business men who help to make Harvard square such a thriving centre. Although he lias occupied Iris present place of business for only six years, he has been in the boot and shoe trade in this city for tlie past thirty-five years. He saw in starling out on his business career what a good, many have no", yet learned—that in order to acquire a lucrative patronage, only the best goods niusl be sold and the eonlidence of the customer must be secured. While other dealers complaln'that too many of thc|best people of the city goes lo Boston lo make their purchases, Mr. Wilder has learned Ihe secret of keeping his customers at home, hy offering them as large and as well a selected stock as any Bolton dealer and al prices which his competitors at the other side of the bridge cannot hope lo rival. If other local shopkeepers followed his met hods there would be fewer complaint! heard about Boston gelling all the best patronage of Cambridge. Mr...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Reeves Brothers. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

Reeves Brothers. One of the enterprising linns of Old Cambridge is that of Beeves Bros., druggists, who have two stores, one tit 5.", l Main street and tba other, No. ,"i Mt. Auburn street. The members of the linn are Frederick W. and William A. Beeves, both young men and full of ambition, with a creditable record and a good experience to back them up. Frederick W. Beeves was horn in Manchester, N. 11., April 31, 1861. He has resided for the past twelve years iv Cambridge. He commenced to team the druggist's business leu years ago iv Ihe old stand at the corner of Washington and Winter streets, now carried rrs by Mr. 11. F. Bradbury. Here he was head el rk for three years, and the experience obtained in that itore in one year generally count! for half a dozen yean spent'in others. Mr. William A. Reeves was born May 30, 1883, in Lowell, and has resided in Cambridge ihe past dozen years. He also learned his trade at Bradbury's pharmacy, with which ha was connected for six or seven yea...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 10 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

LOW'S DRY GOODS STORE. 460 Harvard Square, May 7, 1887. A long time ago Dry Goods bought in Cambridge were much higher than Boston prices. That .time has gone by; so save the time and trouble of going to town by purchasing what you need of Horace G-. Low. Harvard Sq* JAMES BOLGER, Shoer of Gentlemen's Driving Horses. HORBEB' FEET THOROUGHLY AND UNOERBTANDIN6LY TREATED. A LIFE experience in the business with an AIM to be a MASTER of all its branches. If your horses are not being shod to suit you, or if you desire a trustworthy blacksmith, try my methods. I believe they will suit you. Large and convenient shop, NO. 9 PALMER STREET, OLD CAMBRIDGE. nsrow^-s---Is the Proper Time to Take a Good Spring Tonic. TRY OUR ELIXIR CALISAYA. n.KASANT TO THE TASIK. INVIGORATING AND STRENGTHENING. W. A. CLAFLIN, Apothecary, I Brattle Street, Cambridge, Mass. JOHN IMD &M, ■:■ 7PRINTING OFFICE, 10 Dunster St. (a few steps from Harvard Sq.) Artistic and Unique Designs a Specialty. Samples s...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 10 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

tj. W. BRINE, v OUTFITTBR AKD D*A_B IN Gents' Furnishing Goods, CLOTHING. HATS, CAPS, TRUNKS, 108t Camb r X R ° W ' SPORTING GOODS ' Union Square. Forß«**B*n, T«_ni», BostingsodOy-i-aaiam, Somerville. -,-.,-.—.«—.«_.- „ .. Davis Square, UNIFORMS Of all MlldS, West Somerville. Q|JR QWN , M p O RTATIONS. Agents at all the Colleges. The Largest College Furnishers in the World. THE HARVARD MARKET. ESTABLISHED 185 S. T. H. BREWER, Proprietor. ■ ( r_____k_Ht2 v . 3tfc- •»*___. ___> *" fHal Hal V&. '' _*«riSaS3! H IflH_i "*' ■ .H.H ........fl H i sJvll laflE^flH Beef, Pork, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, flams, Poultry, Game, Laril, Eggl, llcair., Cranhcrr'i., Oeliry Splnage, Lettuce, ""/"" Kadl.h, Toinali... In cam, TonraUi X Imp, Ploklcn, Shaker Apple Sauce, ill I lv.la of Vegetable., Fruit, etc. No. 1 Brewer's Block, Brattle Square, opp. University Press. tr Good, aent lo ill p*rt. of the city free of charge.

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Irving Blake. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

Irving Blake. Mr. Irving Blake, the proprietor of tho old Church-street stables, was horn in Gorhara, Me., in 1829. When two years old he went to Portland, Me., with his parents. His father, Charles Blake, was proprietor of the largest cracker manufactory east of Boston. Mr. Irving Blake was employed as clerk for his father for four years, from 1840 to 18.">l>, when he succeeded him in the business, and for thirty-six years, until his coming to Cambridge, couriucted it very successfully. Desiring a change from that business he sold out his stock, leased his building for five years, and bought out the Churchstreet stables In this city, formerly owned by Mr. J. S. Pike. The stand is seventyfive years old, and among its patrons today aro the third and fourth generations of its original customers. It is also today one of the best equipped stables out of Boston. It is stocked with eighty-four horses and over a hundred carriages anil employs twenty-two men. The stock...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
R. H. Woodland. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

R. H. Woodland. One of the leading stores in this thriving centre is the dry-goods establishment kept by .the above-mentioned gentleman. Like many others of our local dealers, Mr. Woodland began in a small way, and from season to _•_!__ increased his stock and extended his business. Ho opened about two years ago in the store now occupied by Miss Powers at 8.15 Main sireet. February 1 of the present year lie removed to his present store in Read's block, on Boylston street. The store Is one of the best in Cambridge anil is well stocked with all those articles so necessary to the feminine tdiet. Dressmaking is one of the branches of his business to which lie gives special attention. Mr. Woodland was in tlie employ of Hogg, Brown <V Taylor, Boston, for thirteen years, and he is a dry-goods dealer who is thoroughly up in all the requirements of his business.

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Arthur W. Cutler. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

Arthur W. Cutler. Mr. Arthur W. Cutler, who is engaged in the grocery business near the corner of Trowbridge street, was born in Cambridge, July 15, IS,:;, and gained his education in our public school-. 11.. was employed i r seven years at Harvard University, the last five at Ihe astronomical observatory under Prof. Pickering. In December, 1885, he went West, locating in .Minneapolis, Minn., where he established himself in the grocery business. A year and a half ago he sold out and returned to the familiar scenes of Cambridge, opening a grocery store at 881 Mairr street, where he is conducting business in a straightforward way and is meeting with all the success that can reasonably be expected. His store is well supplied with goods needed for family trade, and he is ready to (ill .all orders promptly.

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
James W. Marshea. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

James W. Marshea. Mr. Marshes, the jeweller at the corner of Harvard anrl Holyoke streets, learned his trade in the great English manufacturing city of Birmingham. He came to this country in 1872, and like many emigrants tried his luck in the West. Not liking that part of the republic he came East and settled iv Cambridge. He was employed for ten years in the Holyoke store when it was owned by Mr. Huntington. In 1883 he began business for himself, ami seems to be well satisfied with bis success. A well assorted stock of jowelry anil optical goods are to be found at bis store, and bo does a large amount of repairing. His store Is one of the most conveniently aituated ƒ— tho square, and is always bright and interesting in appearance. He numbers among his patrons many of the well-to-do families, as well as some of the students.

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
W. J. Edwards. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

W. J. Edwards. Wo have spoken before in these columns of the new store which Mr. Edwards occupies In Read's block, 22 Boylston street. For the past ten years ho has been known to .our readers as a house and sign painter and! paper hanger of excellent reputation for good workmanship. Dining tlie present year he removed to hie present elegant quarters and added largely to his stock. At present his assortment of wall paper is the largest In the immediate vicinity, while his supply of pain s, varnishes, oils, glass and arlisls' materials is one of the most complete in the city. He is an excellent artisan himself, and employs some first-class workmen. Some of the best houses about here have been decorated by him. With the growth of Cambridge his business is hound to increase.

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
George M. Joll. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

George M. Joll. Mr. George M. Joll, the barber in Barnsay's building, is a Peabody lad. He was born there July 12, 18.50, and emigrated to Cambridge in 187:1. He learned his trade in his native town, where he worked at It for five years. When lie first came to Cambridge lie located in tlie Lyceum building, where he remained fourteen mouths, when he gave up the business, owing to 111 health, and went on the horse cars. He worked there for a year and in 1875 resumed his trade at his present location, where he has since remained, with the exception of one year, 1881, which he spent West. Mr. Joll has the largest barber shop in the square and does probably the largest business the year round. He has four chairs and employs three men. Ho Is a popular man in the square. Push, enterprise and grit generally lead a business man to success. Those are tlie factors which have elevated Mr. David Brewer to the position he now holds In Old Cambridge in relation lo Ihe provision trade. Thrown Upon ...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
J. F. Noera. [Newspaper Article] — Cambridge Tribune — 14 May 1887

J. F. Noera. The manufacture of athletic garments and specialties in lawn tennis clothing for college students has of late years assumed great proportions, and the men who succeed best in pleasing the students are those who live near tlie colleges and cater directly to the tastes of the men. Mr. J. F. Noera Is one of the best known men in his line. Besides carrying a fine stock of men's fur- nisliings, hats, canes, and ail sorts of sporting goods, lie makes a specially of gymnastic, aquatic and lawn tennis clothing, as well as everything iv the way of out-door garments for the seaside or mountains. Tire rapid strides iv sports which colleges anil the higher schools have made within the past few ycais, have made such establishments as his a necessity in school life. How well he has succeeded may be Inferred from the fact that his business has grown iv five years from a very small affair lo an important and lucrative trade. Mr. Noera is a native of Palermo, Italy, and has been in this...

Publication Title: Cambridge Tribune
Source: Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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