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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 140 "f ! at the close of his college career there he entered the Jesuit novitiate in Switzerland in 1830. After being engaged a num ber of years in the college at Freiburg, he went to pursue the higher ecclesiastical studies at the Jesuit scholasticate in that city, and in 1842 was ordained priest. Within a year, answer ing a call for missionaries for the far west, he crossed the ocean and spent some months at St. Louis, fitting himself for his future life work. In the spring of 1844 the little band of missionaries crossed the Rocky Mountains, and settled at St. Mary's mission, at the present site of Stevensville, Mont., having made the overland journey in six months. He was appointed acting supervisor, which office he was relieved of by Father Congiatae, in 1846. Father DeSmet, on his way to and from Portland, Oregon, , had several times seen the Cceur d'Alene Indians, and had ob served wild, tricky, but well-disposed natures. He deter mined to establish a miss...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

i4i The Indian Advocate. ing the colds of winter, regardless of the summer heats, he traveled about from place to place, mostly afoot, dispensing instructions and the consolations of religion to the red men. Everywhere he went he earned the good will and affection of those with Avhom he came in contact. That his influence was great, even as early as 1858, may be well attested by the fact that it was owing almost entirely to his prudence and tact that the Indian troubles of 1857-58, in which Gen. Steptoe and his ammunitionless command were killed, was quelled. Though Father Joset spent nearly all of his time among his beloved Indians (and they fairly worshipped him), still he was a great favorite among the early white settlers. From the necessity of being alone for days, week's and months at a time, he had acquired the habit of inclining his head on his chest and meditating or praying quietly amidst the grand silence of the forests primeval, giving free rein to his faithful pony. And...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 142 ! H "H ' X?ts- Epv''1 wstostj v vj LV. jjtv !? '' t f- Vf ?r "Money is dirt cheap," remarked the observant boarder, who was reading the financial department. "That must apply especially to filthy lucre," added the cross-eyed boarder. A schoolboy defined "anodyne" as "something to a sau sage pan," and then brought Webster's Unabridged to his skeptical teacher with his finger pointing triumphantly to the words: "serving to assuage pain." "O, Fraulein, I love you'! Listen to my suit, as I kneel here in the dust before you?" "Excuse me, Sir, but our carpets are not dusty." "Mamma," said little Charlie, "are you going to heaven some day?" "Yes dear, 1 hope so," was the reply. "I wish papa could go too," continued the little fellow. "Well, and don't you think he will?" asked the mother. "Oh, no," replied Charlie, "he could not leave his busi ness." "I have a song here that I think will do." "Is there any sense in it?" " t , , "Not a particle." "Is there any time i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

143 The Indian Advocate. Curate: I never saw such a set of idiots as I had to preach to this morning. Maggie (one of the congregation): I suppose that is why you kept calling them "Dearly beloved brethren." "I am a self-made man," he boasted. "Oh, well," said a. -hearer, "we'll forgive you, only don't do it again." The little Boston maiden wiped her glasses thoughtfully and said she would take vanilla ice-cream, because that was extracted from'beans. "Madame," said the tramp, "I was once a member of the legislature." "And are you sure," she asked, inclined to be lieve ,him "that your reformation is complete?" "Pa, what is quietjiostility?" "Quiet hostility, little Jim, is the way in which, when I decline to give you a penny, you sneak around behind my chair and make faces." Wanted. A modern young lady's forehead. The editor of this column not having seen one for several years is willing to pay a fair price for a glimpse of the genuine old article. No ' banged or otherwise mutilated ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 144 laughter which explosively followed this Teutonic retort showed who, in the opinion of the legislators, had tne better of the argument. The man who says that woman has not invented anything should listen for a few minutes at the key-hole of the sewing so.ciety. Under the head ot "Musical" a Cleveland paper gives an account of a horse trot. Presume it was an attempt to beat time. "Well," said an Irish attorney, "ii it plaze the court, I am wrong in this, I have another point that is equally con clusive. An Indian upon Connecticut River called at a tavern, in the tall, oi the year, tor a dram. The landlord asked him two coppers for it. The next spring, happening at the same house, he called for another, and had to pay three coppers tor it. "How is this, landlord," he said, "last tall you asked but two coppers for a glass ot rum, now you ask three. "O," says the landlord, "it costs me a great deal to keep 'em overwinter. It is as expensive to keep a hogshead of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

145 The Indian Advocate. $40.00 per capita. About one-half mile from the Mission, 011 an extensive plain along. the Washita River, were encamped the Indians who remain there, I was told, under their tents until the greater number have spent all their money. The Pawnee Indians' were on a visit and had obtained permission to hold a dance. The weather was all that could be desired. So when I arrived in company with some other visitors about 2 o'clock p. m., the space selected for the amusement was sur rounded by an immense crowd, mostly Indians, afoot; on horseback and in wagons, among them, Kiowas, Apaches, Co manches, Pottawatomies, full-bloods, halt-brceds ot every de scription. The sight was a most interesting one. Seven Indians began beating an immense drum and soon, at the call of some chief with stentorian voice, the Indians issued forth from their tents in gala dress, feathered and painted; the women, who are not allowed to participate in the dance, sat down forming a vast circ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 146 v. .r , tf .- ' . , w. over the donors, whereupon the dance resumed with greater enthusiasm and gaiety. The whole thing may seem ludicrous, but in my eyes, it did not appear any more so than our so-called civilized balls. In fact, I did not notice any thing indecent nor in the least out of the way, and all performers and spectators seemed to enjoy themselves to their hearts' content. There were no refresh ments of any kind passed around, except pure water, and I do not understand how these poor' people could hold out so long without any food or showing the least sign of weariness, or drowsiness under a burning sun, without any protection and the majority without any head covering. Their dances are for the Indians truly religious ceremonies and to which they are most dearly attached. Communicated. BESTEDICTESTE ISTOTKS. . . A monk from the Benedictine Abbey of Bel-loc, diocese of Bayonnc, France, Dom Donation, has founded in the neigh borhood of Pau an agricu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

r r: 147 .Tin Indian Advola'ji vn 5 M: wt " Si.' k K L t H . . Iu consequence of the war in the Philippine Islands, the Benedictine missionaries were forced to leave the parishes. Seven of the Fathers returned to Spain, the others retired to Manila, where they have formed a community. It is believed that they will remain and continue the apostolic labor. ..The Benedictine Monastery of St. Michael, of Farn borough, Eng., has been erected into a conventional priory. , . The Benedictine Abbey of Montserrat, will soon estab lish a Monastery in the diocese of Salona in Spain. The monks will open there an agricultural college. The Monastery will be under the name of our Lady of. the Miracle. ..The Rt. Rev. Charles Motsche, Abbot of Marie-Stein-Delle, died on April 18th. . . On the 6th of May last, the Episcopal consecration of the most Rev. Dominic Scrafini, O. S. B., as Archbishop of Spoleto, Italy, took place in the church of St. Ambrose, Rome This prelate comes from a distinguished fam...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

Till IfvMATs AliVO(JK. 14a fiJk VRK JC 1 V V Wfc tives of religious orders, arid the various civil and military officials. The Gregorian Mass of D. Pothier was sung by the monks. . . The Bohemian Catholics ot Chicago, held a threefold celebration m the beginning of July; the paternal feast of the Abbey and Parish; the laying of the corner-stone of the Mon astery and Orphanage at Lisle, 111., and the 25th anniversary of the priestly ordination oi the Rt. Rev. D. Nepomuccne Jaiger, O. S. 11. LOCALS. ..To our Kkadlks. 2Vic Advocate, owing to circumstan ces over which we had no contiol, appears two months teitcr--hencoforth it will be sent out regularly every other month,' as it will be printed at the Abbey. Charity towards our neighbor forbids us to say more about the subject. The Editor. ..July the nth, Bros. Stanislaus Tastevin, O. S. B., and Aloysius Hitta, O. S. B., made their solemn profession. ..Rev. Fr. lldephonse, O. S. B., has been appointed .pas tor ot Langston, ad Afi os. . ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

149 The Indian Advocate. . .On August 30th, Rev. Fr. I. Lanslots, ). S. B., cele brated the 25th anniversary of his religious profession. ' . .On the feast'of the Assumption, August 15th, Rt. Rev. Bishop Meerschaert dedicated the new church of Edmond. Our readers will remember that the first church erected in Ok lahoma, was that of Edmond, (1889). Mgr. J. Messer is to be congratulated for his zeal. . . On August 26th, the profession of Sister M. Sebastian (in the world, Miss M. Bridget Murren), was received by Rev. Germanus Guillaume, O. S. B., the little Bishop of Shawnee. . .Father O'Connor, S. J., preached the ecclesiastical re treat to the priests of the diocese, from the 29th to the 31st of August. . . Several changes took place at the end of the retreat. Father Yserman left on a visit to Europe. On his return he will join the Paulists in New York. Father Ancieaux is leaving to join Father Slatery in Baltimore, in order to devote his energies to the negro missions. Father Van d...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

Thk Indian Advocate. 150 i ' ; V wm -: rs5" '4,f ' -n - ' . .Rev. Fr. Germanus, 0. S. B., has a splendid school at Shawnee, under the direction of the scholarly Sister Mary Thomas. ..Rev. Fr. Hilary, O. S. B., has been appointed Master of Novices. . .Rev. Fr. Hippolyte, O. S. B., has a nourishing school at Lehigh and Coalgate, the strike notwithstanding. . . Our Indian school has a fair attendance. . . This year, our College has more pupils than ever, and every laddie seems to be satisfied. v" "" o o" ,, r .XU -C . TITTC HMJiST "AlL SOULS' DAY." FROM the earliest clays of her existence, the Holy Church has offered prayers for the departed. The Holy Fathers relate how the Apostles themselves were wont to celebrate the Com memoration of the dead. The mo.st ancient monuments of Christian art give express ion to the prayers of the first Christians for their own departed brethren, and to their invocation of the Saints in b.ehalf of these same deparLed. The history of our Holy Church unfu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

i5i The Indian Advocate. & I" ' Et i t ' r r it It was as late as the Eleventh Century, whep. the Com memoration of all the faithful departed on the 2ild of Novem ber, was publicly approved and introduced into the universal Church. Long before that period, however, individual Churches and individual Bishops and Abbots had set aside a special day for the Commemoration of All Souls. St. Peter Damian relates to us in his life of St. Odilo, Ab bot of Clugny, how this great Saint, about the year iooo or dered an All Souls' Day to be celebrated in all the monaster ies' of his extensive order on the 2nd day of November, in-a similar manner as it is celebrated to-day. He narrates the par ticular occurrence, which occasioned this order of St. Odilo: "A pious religious, on his return from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, was cast upon an unknown island by a storm. Oil this island he met a holy Hermit, who informed him, that in the vicinity of .his cell he frequently heard wonderful and terr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 152 4V ,: 8 v f51 V"-: 1 u AkV . ,r rwa& not the first observance of its kind. The great historian Ma billion, O. S. B., demonstrates that in the Order of St. Bene dict an All Souls' Day was celebrated before the time of Odilo, with this difference, that it fell on the day after Pentecost or Trinity Sunday, instead of the 2nd of November. From the annals of the Monastery of Fulda we might in fer, that such a day was observed in Germany, as early as the year 874. For we read in these annals, how King Louis, in a terrible vision during the Lenten time of that same year be held his father, Louis the Pious, in Purgatory, in great tor- ment, and soon' after issued a circular to all the Bishops and Abbots of his Kingdom, enjoining special prayers for the faith ful departed. Amalarius, a writer of the Eighth Century, in his book of the Divine Offices mentions an annual Commemoration of the departed and he even connects the feast day of All Saints with the office fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

153 Tht: Indian Advocate. 1 ? i Centuries, and was observed by the faithful in different coun tries. The time of celebration differed from our own, but the same idea suggested the selection of the time. It was cele brated at the end of a cycle of feasts, of Christmas-tide, of Easter-tide, etc., as it is to-day celebrated when the feasts of the Ecclesiastical year have culminated in the feast of All Saints. The history of All Souls' Day shows, how very Catholic an institution it is, Catholic in time an extent, being celcbrat-' ed from the earliest ages, and in various Catholic countries, Catholic in its idea, springing naturally from the kindly soil of Catholic teaching and Catholic Charity. D. A. s yr t l r i PURGATORY EST PAJjSTTIjO. 1HAVE read in the Dictionary ot Education a very amusing - t anecdote, which may, nevertheless, be cited of what .1 have said of All Souls' Day. Ceitain canons over iooo years ago, having had to repaii their Church, added to it a chapel dedica ted to t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 154 - . I rY . 1 m m JS"1 , ti- & . -7 ,"- "! - af.' 51 M MA TTjZ & i 4Z -TjA'o J' -. uuP-LfiHhtf ji""L X rfi .J( D.j??. c. . satisfaction, are detained in the flames of Purgatory till they have paid their debts. Now his Procurator has owed me a hundred crowns these two years past, and I am not yet paid. So that is just the reason why I thought myself authorized to place the Abbot in my Purgatory. I assure you, my Lord, 1 will leave him there forever, unless your Lordship will have the goodness to see me paid. The Prelate and all who were present could not help laughing at this singular justification. The complainant himself could not object to the demand thus made; he acquitted himsetf with a good grace, and ordered his Procurator to pay the hundred crowns. The Sculptor, on his side, modified the figure in Purgatory, and represented it as cending to Heaven, like a' Soul which has fully satisfied the justice of God. IjSTDIAJST territory population. AAAAA...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

nr 155 The Indian Advocate. TO WHOM IT MAY CONOBRJST: WVSWNAAVy HAVING received lately many inquiries in regard to "Okla homa; we have thought well to give a description of the climate, natural features, products, population, etc., for the benefit of those who contemplate settling here. Having been a continual resident of Oklahoma for more than twenty years, and traveled much over the country, I can speak from practical experience, and personal observation. The climate is mild. The summers are long and warm, lasting from May 1st to September 30th; the thermometer ranging from 80 to 100 degrees. The heat is not very op pressive, it being tempered by an almost continual breeze. The nights are always cool and pleasant. The winters are very variable. The changes in the temperature are sudden and violent, and the cold sometimes intense, the thermometer' fall ing occasionally as low as zero, but this only occurs during a severe blizzard lasting from two to five days. Most of the winter is...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 156 ft w though the second crop is sometimes short owing to the sea son. Sweet potatoes can be raised in abundance, the crop never failing. Castor beans, peanuts, sorghum and kafir corn iv ' a11 do equally well. Fruits do remarkably well, especially . - - grapes, peaches, apricots and some varieties of apples. All f v ' sorts of garden vegetables can be raised in abundance ,- The health conditions here are good, the only trouble aris ing on that score being from malaria, which is very prevalent during the latter part of summer and the fall. The Indians have been granted permission to sell their lands, reserving eighty acres for a homestead. The land is sold through the Indian agent. Uplands sell from $3 to $5 per acre, and bot tom lands from $6 to $8. Indian lands may be rented through the agent, at from $1.25 to $8.00 per acre, taking into account " the fertility of the land, improvements on the place, nearness ' to market, etc. There is an abundance of fine oa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

h ' ? 1900. M Rr &.,?. pJ'Pffw 1900. CALENDAR NOVEMBER. All Saints D. ist CI. and Octave. All Souls. Oct. semid. '''" Oct. semid. ' 22d Sunday after Pent. St. Charles. P. C. D. Oct. semid. Oct. semid. Oct. semid. . ' Octave of All SS. D. t Dedic. Lateran Basilica D,. S. Adeodatus Pope C. O. S. B. D. ; ' 23d Sund. after Pent. St. Martin P. C. D. maj. , St. Emilian Abbot, O. S. B. D. All SS. Monks D. 2d CI. - St. Justus P. C. O. S. B. semid. ( . St. Martin Pope M. semid. St. Didacus C. semid. St. Gertrude the Great V. O. S. B. D.f2d CI. 24th Sund. aft. Pent. Ded. Basil, ss. Peter and Paul. D. St. Elizabeth of Hungary Wid. D. St. . Felix 6f Valois C. D. Presentation B. M. V. D. maj. St. Cecilia V. M. D. St. Clement Pope M. D. ' ' St. Columban Abbot O. S. B. I). ' "V 25th Sund. aft, Pent. St. Catherine V. M. D. ' St. Silvester Abbot, O. S. B. D. '' St. Oddo Abbot, O. S. B. D. St. Gregory the Wonder-worker, semid. ' Vig. St. John of the Cross CD. - St. Andrew the Apostle D. 2d CI. .v...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

il ! ifi tf- sl . , & -4- - THE m Vol. XII. December, igoo. No. 6. SUMMARY. NVNWW The Seminoles. Quanah Parker's Career. Facetiae. The Press and Catholic Youth. Benedictine News. Locals. J oe. Advent. BUILT OJST A ROCK. WHEN Christ with Uncreated Wisdom plann'd To build a Church that unto Judgment Day, The wrath and power of Darkness should withstand, And ever on whose spire Truth's dazzling ray Should shine from lamp. well-trimmed by vestal hand To guide the wand' ring seaman on his way He did not think to build it upon sand, Which every wave of Error's watery store Might wash away, and leave its turrets grand A pile of ruins on Time's surge-beat shore. rFar was such thought from His all-knowing Mind, Whoj when he builded, builded on a rock, That would till Time's end brave the howling wind, The seething storm, the direful earthquake's shock. Frederic J. Halm.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1900

159 The Indian Advocate. TIIE SEMINOLE S. THEIR PRESENT CONDITION AND ATTITUDE. EVER since the Caucasian landed on the shores of America, a white man with a gun has been watching the Indian. Four centuries have gone and with them a record of broken treaties and violated pledges. The record of the Indian bureau support the statement, that before the first half of the present centu ry had passed, we had broken seven solemn treaties with the Creeks, eleven with the Cherokees; the Chickasaws and Choctaws suffered too, saying nothing of smaller tribes. His tory reveals how well the Delawares ught for us in the rev olutionary war. They were brave "allies," fighting out of loy alty to the "Alliance", and inspired by the promised reward, viz: .The "territorial right to a state as large as Pennsylvania and a right to representation in our Congress." But where are the Delawares now? One remove after another was made until we find only a remnant existing some with the Cherokees, and a few with...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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