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Elephind.com contains 38,956 items from Minneapolis Journal, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

2 Pulpit and Pew IT IS A BAD CUSTOM Edward Bok Scores Pulpit Reading of Secular Notices. A CIRCULAR IS MUCH PREFERABLE Mi-. linU Tlituks That the Churches lit ii not Abolish the Old Practice Too Soon. If there are any Minneapolis church goers who are afflicted weekly with an im promptu lecture in connection with the giving out of church notices they will ap preciate what Edward Bok has to say edi torially In the last number of the Ladles' Home Journal on "The Pulpit as a Bill Board." As a rule the churches of this city where the organization can afford it have the weekly calendar printed so that the attendants will have a directory for the week to refer to and also that the time which was formerly used by the pulpit in dilating upon the affairs of the coming week may be put to better uses. The ar ticle follows: The custom of reading secular notices from the pulpit is happily being abolished by a number of churches. As a substitute, either a leaflet, circular or gome printed form of ...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

BATTTEDAY EVENING, MARCH I), 1901. Books and Authors THE LITERARY OUTLOOK AN AMERICAN' BOOK EDITED FOR THE ENGLISH MARKET BY MR. HARMS WORTH, CALLED "MR. TRUNNELL," A STRONG NOVEL OF THE SEA BY T. JENKINS HAINS—THE AUTHOR AND EDITOR AT PLAY—A NEW NOVEL BY CAPTAIN HAINS. j~— __EW YORK, March 7.—1 have recently had the good fortune to look over a |7W|| C°P-V of au American sea story edited by Alfred Harmsworth for an l^llj Eußlisa edition. The comments and side notes which Mr. Harnisworth Ij made on the copy are of more than ordinary interest, not merely because mBLJ he is a multimillionaire editor, but rather because they display the ability and keen insight to see and do the right thing which have brought millions to him. The booh is "Mr. Trunnell," with a subtitle of 'Mate of the Ship Pirate." It was written by T. Jenkins Hams and was published in this country a year or more ago. It was duly copyrighted in England but no English publisher to whom It was offered would undertake to b...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

£ THE JOURNAL LUCIAN SWIFT, J. S. McLAIN, MANAGER. EDITOR. Tli E JOC 11 A L ia published every evening, except Sunday, at 47—it) Fourth Street South, Journal Building, Miuneapolii, Minn. ;.. . C J. Bliiaott, Manager Eastern Adver tising. NEW YORK OFFICE—B6, 87, 88 Tribune building. A CHICAGO OFFICE—3OB Stock Exchange building. ~~ SUBSCRIPTION Ti;iOlS Payable to The Journal Printing Co. Delivered by mail. On© copy, one month $0.35 One copy, three months 1.00 One copy, six months 2.00 One copy, one year........ 4.00 Saturday Eve. edition. 20 to 26 pages. 1.50 Delivered by carrier. One copy, one week 8 cents One copy, one month.... ....35 cents Single copy • 2 cents CHANGES OF AUURUSS Subscribers ordering addresses of their papers changed must always give their former as well as present address. COXTINLKD All papers are continued until an ex plicit order is received for discontinuance, uud until all arrearages are paid. COMPLAINTS Subacribera will pleaae notify the office In every cane...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

SATUKDAY EVENING. MAKCH 9, 1901. MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE !«■>»■■■ ir ■■■-■... ■ ■■■■■■»■_■ mmm^mm ■■ i— i—i ———- -- — — i THE HOUSE REFUSES Doesn't Pass Senate Amendment to Reapportionment Bill. MATTER GOES TO A CONFERENCE Those Chargen of Bad Faith— mittee Says Its Prouilae Wa* Conditional* - The conference committee on the Somer vllle amendment to the reapportlonment bill, which was appointed to-day has agreed not to meet till Tuesday when the members of both bouses will have plenty of time to get back from their Sunday vis its home. While Messrs. Somerville and Larson are keeping a stiff upper lip The Journal is able to state positively that they are beaten, and that eventually the senate will yield and withdraw its amend ment. Reapportlonment will then be set tled just as the committee settled it. Reapportionment is still tied up. Wheu the message from the senate annoum-lng «v amendment to the bill, was read in the hou»e this morning, Chairman Anderson moved that the house do n...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

6 THE CONQUEST OF THE SIOUX These Victories Are the Victories of Peace- Some Contrasting Pictures of Conditions in the Sioux Country. • It wac 1834. There stepped ashore from the Warrior, a Mississippi steamboat, at Fort Snelling, two men whose names were destined to become household words in the tepees of the Sioux nation —the Pond brothers of Connecticut. In 1835, they were Joined by Dr. Williamson and Amos W. Huggina of Ohio and in 1837 by Rev. Stephen R. Riggs of the same state. Their mission was the conquest or" that savage tribe of prairie warriors, by the sharp two-edged sword of the Bpirit of the Lord, and their uplift by the power of the gospel of His Son. Then and there began one of the most heroic struggles of modern times. What "was the outcome? It was 1862. The scene shifts, two hundred miles to the west, to the shores of Liac quiParle, the "Lake-that-Speaks"; twenty-eight years since the coming of the Pond brothers to Fort Snelling. All these years, the work had been p...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

SATURDAY EVENING-, MAKCH 9, 1901. _^... ,„ _ -T^aafa^^—^^- ii ■mill, nun - ' .' ■ . ; """"" . ' • -■"'■I 1! ————■"■■ hi ■■■ 1111111 11111111 1 —— £mS AMBITIOUS MACALESTER GIRLS They Arc So Ambitious for Knowledge They Take AH the Electives Time Will Permit—Cosy, Cheery Home-Life at "The Elms," Presided Over by Mrs. Julia M. Johnson. ' "* 8881 |p*^**- 11^1 I <I nil v # ■ M9HBIE! * HI • 1» llr'lM Haillll MRS. JOHXSOX, THE D EAN*. IX HER STUDY. The busiest group of girls in the twin cities is probably to be found at Macales ter college. When they are not studying they are reciting, and each day is so tilled with recitations and study that there is time for nothing else. This is not the fault of the college, but of the students. They are so mentally grasping that they want to take advantage of all the elect ives, in addition to the regular course, that they can cram into the day, and their only regret is that time limits the number. These Macaleeter college girls come from Minnesota,...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

,8 CAVESSON AND THE CENTIPEDE CAVESSON'S BLUNDER By GUY BOOTHBY. Copyright, 1900, by Guy Boothby. i£v«n if Cavesson had not been anxious to do so before, which could scarcely be doubted, he felt doubly compelled, after Mr. Walkett's generous treatment of him, to ■ cert all his energies to effect the capture of that notorious bushranger, the Centipede, lie had been the laughing stock of the colon ies for too long, and to a man so proud, ridicule was worse than death. The story of ihe bogus millionaire, and the little outing with the bank manager of Nollaba station, had been copied into ail the papers, uud Cavfsson's enemies had taken excellent care that he should see the various accounts given of It. The government, through the commis sion of police, had also stirred him up again, aud as a result he was nearly distracted. One more blunder, he knew, would spell ruin, and ruin would mean a loss of Minnie Walkett, which was worse than either. But he had no ;utention of making another mi...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 9, 1901. THEATERS *~ BILLS \ OF • THE ; WEEK ''.' 44Arliona"-at the -Metropolitan. - "King of the Opium Ring"— the Bijou. ' ' "Jolly Grass Widows"— at the Demrey. "Arizona" opens a week's engagement at the Metropolitan to-morrow night, with the usual Wednesday and Saturday mat inees. It returns to -ARIZONA." this city with every feature which char acterized its brilliant. New York produc tion. .Metropolitan critics declare that no play has attracted more attention than this for its happy combination of inherent emotional strength and vraisemblance of character portraiture. Those who know Augustus Thomas, the author, through his earlier successes, "Alabama" and "In Mizzouri," will appreciate the difficulties that must have attended the writing of "Arizona." It is far from an easy matter to strike the exact key note in a drama which deals with that borderland to which the tele phone and the electric light are going but slowly, A step too much and the author fin...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

10 WHEAT CLOSED FIRMER, MAY AT 74* CENTS Trading Quiet With Tendency to Wait for the Government Re port on Monday. CLEARANCES WERE MODERATE Blore - Activity Looked For in Xext Week* Market—Xevvg of.the Grain Trade. Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, March 9. —Wheat showed a tendency to recover yesterday's loss and was firm this morning, but the session turned dulL after the opening flurry, and was draggy. Liv erpool closed *&d higher. May opened at 74^c and sold to 74% c, reacted to 74 1 / 4 c and held. Towards the end there was a break to 74% c with recovery to 74% c, vrhere. the market closed. The dullness rose from a feeling of hesitation in all markets. There is the usual tendency noted to go slow pending receipt of the government report. The visihle figures on Monday and the government report is to follow, giving an estimate of stocks in farmer^ hands —are expected to have in fluence and a more active market and wltfer price range are looked for next week. Parts dropped off 1...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

SATURDAY EVENING. MARCH 9, 1901. AETNA INSURANCE COMPANY— office: Hartford, Conn. (Organized in: 1819.) Wm. B. Clark, President. Wm. H. King, Secretary. Attorrey to accept service in Min nesota: Insurance Commissioner. Cash capi tal, $4,000,000. ■ r ■ - ■;. „^ .-..INCOME IN 1900. Premiums other {Da* teals' $1,191,344.03 Premiums on perpetual risks .... - 6,784.23 Rents; and interest „.....; 516,144. Profit on ledger assets over book- ■ -. values V.... 450.00 From all other sources ......;... 44,486.07 Total income $4,762,208 66 DISBURSEMENTS IN; 1900. Amount paid for, losses ......... $2,602,048.43 Dividends and interest 720,000.00 Commissions, brokerage, salaries snd allowances to agents .... 705,217.59 Salaries of officers and employes - 298,358.39 Taxes and fees ......... ' J28.0U.8P All other disbursements 3*5,102,96 Total disbursements $4,798,739.17 Excess of disbursements over In- •• >■ .' ■ ■'■ * come ..:'.; 36,0?0.51 ASSETS DEC. 31. 1900. --value of real estate owned.... ...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

12 California's Great Oil Fields. ffILLIFORNIA'S oil fields are an other magnet drawing the at tention of eastern states to the greatness of the big coast state. The possibilities of these fields are just beginning to be appre ciated. Since the discovery of gold in 1849 the history of California has been one of constant discoveries of treasures. Ever since the pioneers fifty years ago crossed the plains to find a cure for the gold fever •within its borders it has been the Mecca of health seekers. Her scenery is the wonder of the traveler and the fruits and wines of California are the delight of the lumber. In her forests are millions of feet of lumber. Now, as the trade of the United States is advancing in the orient, Cali fornia again comes forward with an in dustry capable of aimost unlimited de velopment. It is said by scientific men that the production of petroleum in that state will before long exceed the produc tion of any of the known oil fields on this continent. The explore...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

The Journal J\mior Aided by Sight Unexpected Discoveries Made by- Min neapolis Juniors. * Finds Are Both Unique and Valuable, yf * * * in HE Juniors must either wear lucky stones or carry charms or talismans of some kind. They seem , to have a knack of picking up money and jewelry that makes the editor green with envy. She did not mind so much when it was a penny or a dime, but when they stumbled over five dollar gold pieces and the wind blew crisp bank notes in their direction, she felt as if she had been slighted. The sum total of the finds must have been in the neighborhood of $130. The Juniors have a happy faculty not only of fortunate discoveries, but they find them just when most needed. One found a dollar just before Christmas, when she had spent her last cent and still had two presents to buy. Another was about famished for a glass of ice cream soda when she found a dime by the edge of the walk. That time and thought are necessary in order to write a good story was the disco...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

2 tn Hes the attraction of the lowly plains. Were I given the choice of a home beside a beautiful lake or prairie, I would take " the latter. Why? Because the memory of many happy moaths spent upon grassy plains is stamped upon ay memory and can never be forgotten. A ride through the keen air upon a frisky pony is better than a weary climb up a mountain to catch a _ glimpse of the sun's rays. In winter the snow covers the earth with a white blanket and the piercing blasts of the north wind cut through the air like eaglets' wings. To be pent up in a valley between two mountains was my lot for a month. A prison it felt to me, for something I longed lor was not there, but. what it was I could not tell. The beauti ful lake had no charms for me. I screamed at those miserable - » peaks and their cruelty and wished ■, I . were in my home on the • plains. At. last my prison bars were opened and I sped home ward, leaving those beautiful yet hateful mountains behind. Feel ing the cool air upo...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

what can be so Inviting as a long level road past beautiful green fields —that is, if one happens tp be the happy possessor of a wheel, and the wind is at his back. Then he can experience true pleasure in riding a wheel. Our prairies are beautiful, too. They are prettiest when the grain is ripening and the fields are of a golden brown. The wind blowing over them and bending the tall Wheat, making it nod and wave in every direction, is indeed a pretty sight. I could go on forever telling about our prairies; indeed, any one who took time and had that remarkable quality, patience, could find enough beauty in the prairie to fill a book. I suppose a long time ago the Indians used to kill buffalo just where our best and most cultivated farms lie. But those days are gone; so are Indians and buffalo. Instead of a wild, uncultivated country we have our beautiful rolling prairies with •their fields of grain and groen meadows. —Augusta Newlander, Tenth Grade. Grafcon, N. D. r - A Pleasing Pict...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

4 Tshe JOURNAL JUNIOR.. Mm Harris An son i . - Editor. The Junior Is published by the Minneapolis Journal for the public ■chool children of the northwest, in and above the fifth grade, and is de voted principally to their own writings. There is no expense attached, and all are welcomed as competitors. The editor wishes to encourage cor respondence and suggestions from teachers. All correspondence should be addressed to the Editor Journal Junior. Hither and Yon. IN HIS inaugural address President McKinley said: "Our diversified productions, however, are Increasing in such unprecedented volume as to admonish us of the necessity ot Btill further enlarging our foreign markets by broader commer cial relations." Now we have heard this before, many times and in many variations, but if you will take a map and follow out our pres ent markets, you will undoubtedly be a little startled to see where we-have already gone. Leaving out the European countries, which almost universal ly take our pro...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

Ways looked to the welfare of his" country with a big brotherly in terest, and was always ready to protect it. ▲ Seventh Grade, Thoralf Wetteland. •-;.""■■ A Room, Monroe School. ' «. ~ ~l\'. "Good boys who to their books apply r m • «Bii Will all be great men by and by." - So It was with Abraham Lincoln. His father meant that 'Abraham should learn to read and write and be a fine scholar. But he was poor and the schools were tew and costly at that time. So Abraham did not go to school a whole year before he .was eight years old, and he went but very little after that. His mother was his best teacher. Books were scarce, but she wrote letters and words on bits of paper, and on shingles, and taught 'Abraham to read . them. ' She also taught him; from the Bible. He learned ' easily and would stick "to a book when I others were . asleep or at play. In short, whenever he could find a few spare - moments from his work he' was at his few books, and. often - walked fifty miles to ( borrow on...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

6 Aided by Sight Continued from the First Page. voluntarily? When given to me he was bright green and on the palm for some time he continued so, but one day I found him oh the dark window sill. How homely he was. A very dark brown, not a trace of his pretty color left. Next I put him in, the soft green grass in the yard. He seemed happy and was his pretty green self again. Going into the house I put him on the lace curtain. Slowly the green changed into a brownish drab. ~ How did he do it, and why? Did he control the change or did he partake of the color of the object upon which he stood? I put him upon red and blue articles butT never saw him change to these colors, only to different shades of brown or green. After watching I decided that he could change to the colors of the leaves and branches of trees in which he lived to render himself less easily observed; he changed also when afraid. This is a dis covery all my own, made by the use of my eyes. B Eighth Grade, —Luella Ames, Ada...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

©ggs there, when I slipped and fell down. I sat up and as I Icoked around I discovered something white in the hay. I Jumped up and went to it. Imagine my surprise on seeing the missing box in the hay with Bruno, the house dog, trying to open it. It was evident that he had taken it to play with. I took it to the man and received the reward, which was $3. A Fifth Grade, —Rose Larson, Sheridan School. 1220 Jefferson Street NE. Neither Seen Nor Heard. If you should go into the dining-room at home you would see a painting that we have had ever since I can remember—a beauti ful moonlight landscape. I supposed that I had seen everything on -v7"- ; it as I have looked at It many times.. But the other day as I was locking at it I discovered, perched on one of the highest branches —' of a tree, a brown owl that none of us ever had noticed: B Fifth Grade, ' ; - . ' —Cora Clark. j " "I Whittier School. ;■ 118 W Twenty-seventh Street. 1 * »eep in a Clay Pile. One hot summer day when I was a very...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 9 March 1901

8 ANOTHER COON STORY His liOTe of Honey Broke Up a. ■. Quiltlns Bee. Did you ever see a coon or raccoon? What a funny sharp nose ne has, and liow follows ft nosing out any and everything eatable. He has whiskers like & cat and tail with such even, dark rings around it that they look as if they had been painted there. His feet are long and Ilim like those of a monkey and he makes a little track like a child's. A •woodman once told his wife that a little child was lost in the forest, for he had Been its footprints, and the worthy couple spent the night searching for it, and at last found a racoon. II saw a pet coon climb up a window by a set of wooden ttars once and attack a wasp's nest, eating the wasps with relish. A man ,told me & coon story the other day, though, that beats mine. He says: "Once I carried Che coon with me to a quilting at a place •whero there was a swarm of bees. You know a coon loves honey better than any thing. The quilting was proceeding nicely —all the ...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 11 March 1901

THE MINNEAPOLIS JOIMNAL. PBICE TWO VEX%% :: :, -■ . ' ~ MONDAY EN;gx[^rMAWll 'li, 11.01. " 12 PAfflMtv NO TERMS TO THE BOERS Unconditional Surrender, a London Paper Says. ———^— —_____^__ LIKE THE CONFEDERACY Variety of Surrender Rumors Afjt Afloat in London. BURGHERS SAID TO BE CHANGING Man}-, It I« Reported, Are Preparing to Take I p Anna for the British. itmw York Sun Special Smevlom London, Mapca^U'.r-tfcCttJtidj^gn^^ur^ render such as the United States de manded of the confederacy at the end of the civil war must be England's attitude toward the Boers, in the opinion of the Daily Mall. This morning's issue of the paper, deal- Ing editorially with the pending nego tiations between General Botha and Lord Kitchener, says: The most that can be ganted General Botha is the assurance that the Dutch leaders and general* will not be punished: in other words, the assurance of their personal safety. There can be no stipulations bearing on the political situation of the Transvaal and the Or...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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