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Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,232 items from Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 0 of putting paid detectives upon the track of the girl with a purpose of breaking down her character by such questionable means, is not a good be ginning toward the establishment of his innocence. There should be fair play and the case determined upon its real merits. The detective business will not go. WASHINGTON NOTES. J. F. Tillman, of Tennessee, the re cently appointed register of the treasury, desires hio to express his hie regrets on account of the hie indisposition of the hie presi dent. It takes most of the wind out of the 53- cent dollar nonsense when these dollars command a premium of six cents in Wall street as they have done for several days during the re cent currency stringency. Why is this thus? It is to be observed that several of the statesmen who are now electrify ing congress and the country by their eloquence, are wont to moisten their vocal apparatus from time to time from glasses of liquids upon their tables that vary several shades in color from...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

i THE ADVOCATE. 10 I PLAIN CALAMITY TALX Witt Which the flew York " Eecorder" Leaves the Gold-bug Banks. The Recorder believes that the time haacome when the will of the people must be enforced alike upon congress and president, and the mints of the United States be thrown open to the free coinage of silver. The financial and business situation is admittedly bad. There is no need to ex aggeratelt. It might be worse. It will become worse, much worse, unless con gress and President Cleveland can get together and relieve the existing com mercial congestion by prompt and ade quate legislation. The president admits in his recent message that the repeal of the silver purchase law of 1800 will not fully meet the exigencies of our situation. It is confessed on all hands that to simply re peal the Sherman act and stop there will not leave our currency upon a satisfac tory baalj, or provide for a safe and suffi cient circulating medium. The business of this country cannot be done upon a purel...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 11 a THE PEIOE OP WHEAT. Some Suggestions as to Prospects, by President Loucks. Forecasts are always more or less problematic Yet there are certain fac tors that may be guaged and effects cal culated on with reasonable aocuracy, First, a contraction of currency will cause a general reduction of prices. Sec ond, an inflation of currency will cause a general rise of prices. These are ad mitted propositions and will not be dis puted by any student of political economy. The present situation con firms the first proposition. The yield of wheat, according to the official report, will be from 125,000,000 to 150,000,000 bushels short in the United States. In addition to this the shortage in Europe is very heavy. Were it not for the de moralized condition of business, wheat should sell for $1 per bushel at the home market this year. Two months ago wheat had reached its lowest market price on the Chicago market. Week after week since then it has gone lower and lower in the face ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

12 THE ADVOCATE. MIHESS' GBIEVAflOES. More of Their Trouble Which is not Gen erally Known. The striking miners have f rand a faithful friend in Noah Allen, who haa ben their counsel for several weeks, and who has successfully defended them in a number of cases in the courts of south east Kansas and Missouri. In a recent interview he said: "This strike will have accomplished great (rood whatever may be its ending. It haa brought to light right in our midst a most damnable system of cor poration robbery and oppreeion. Just think of American citizens bowing in humble submission to organized capital until they are woree than slaves. In my rounds, looking after the interests of the strikers, I have found that in Rich Ilill and vicinity, the coal operators are worse than slave owners in the time of African slavery. "The operator compels his employees to pay to the comiany one dollar a month for doctor bills, every month whether married or single, sick or well, and if a physician is needed...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

HE3 ADVOCATE. 13 Trance Wants Our Mines. Denver, Colo., August 19. A special from Aspen, Colo., to the Republican Bays; Senator L. Smith, chairman of the finance committee of the French sen ate has just left Aspen for Park City, Utah. The object of his trip here was to look into the silver producing regions of the United States and was sent out by his government to more particularly ascertain the extent of silver production. He came to Aspen with a letter from President Hagerman, of the Mollie Gib son. It has leaked out since his departure that the Bank of France would, if de sired, establish a branch at Denver; that such branch might be controlled by a directory composed of Colorado capital ists, the bank simply sending a manager from Paris to represent the parent insti tution; that they would agree to furnish $50,000,000 to $100,000,000 or whatever would be required to carry all the silver produced in Colorado for several years, without allowing any to be sold unless the price was...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

THE ADVOOAfJ?B. 14 BOOK BEVEWS. "Roland Graeme, Knight," by Agnes M. Maohar, published by Fords, Howard & Hnlbert, New York. This story ia filled with a rare combination of inter eats. It holds the mind with a charm ing portrayal of very interesting experiences of distinctively human char acters, and at the same time leaves a re markably vivid impression of the right and wrong, the good and bad, the just and unjust elements of both sides of the labor problem. Young Graeme is a Knight of Labor of the highest type and views the organization and the whole labor movement from a plane where the distinctly self-interest is merged into a noble conception of humanity's interest. In his lecture on M Modern Miracles," he makes a very convincing argument for universal co-operation, and his whole life is a winning appeal for more of justice and love in our social and industrial sys tem. There ia so much of pathos and sympathy throughout the whole story that the reader is unconsciously dis a...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

15 .kXaXaXAXICXS CAI1JIU1GX2 CO., CXX1CXXIX7VTZ, OHIO. THE ADVOCATE. You A wade b7.M c.v- tfi f should order aoBUGGIES, CARRIAGES, WAGONS or HARNESS 0 from any one until you have seen oar New Grand Catalogue for 1803,which is mailed free to any address. It shows oyer en hundred new styles, with prices of vehicles P . Oi- rancine from 530 uoward. and Harness irom upwaru. ar rirlv lisnH.inade ind fullv warranted for two u years, and our Spiral Springs are warranted for U years, w e are wrofniied manufacturers for the above organisations. Examine our mammoth display at the World's Fair. In Chicago. The only mannfac- tnr in thA world that sell their entire ontout direct to the consumer, 'ALLIANCE CARRIAGE C0.8jJKXnSSSClnciniiaU, 0. . . . .Vf MONEY SAVED by BUYING DIRECT FROM j - ij We maka Wiwl and Galvanized Steel Mills, Wood sod Steel Towers. Mills told on trial and on time. GET OUR PRICES BEFORE YOU BUY. Write for circulars, prices and terms. Address CXJRBIE WINDMILL CO., Manhattan, ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 August 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 16 DKAXXB IN LEATHER FINDINGS SHOE STORE SUPPLIES, SADDLERY SADDLERY HARDWARE. Stokk: 224 Kansas Avenue, JrpnY and TTTneHnnHi! 631 A533Kas.Ave.N. TOFEKA. EAGLE BRAND THE BEST ROOFING. . l-j TTmioo Dim T?m.tnrv or Outbuildings, and coats half the price of shin- RIBS, un or iron. " " , applied by any one. Send stamp for samples ana state size of roof. EXCELSIOR FAINT and ROOFING CO., Dept. 6, 155 Duane St, New York, N. Y. Union Fact lie! jvn. F. CARTER. Lessee. Coolest house in the city. Large rooms, well ventilated. Terms reasonable. Boautlful parks front and rear. TOPE5ICA., EXCHANGE COMPANY STORE, Sixth and Quinoy Sts., TOPEIA, Carry a full line of STAPLE and FANCY GRO CERIES. Undor ownership and management of the Shawnee County Farmers' Alliance. Our rule Good Goods at Lowest Prices. We ask your trade and will make you money. Cash for all country produce. Don't fail to find us on Sixth street, one block east of Kansas ave nue. Telephone 810. EXCHANGE CO. rear Buttsr,...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

J&Halfl,l THE CONGRESSIONAL FUHEEAL. The Only Cheerful Peature About it the Attitude of the Populists. The proceedings of the past week gives congress the appearance of a body of men preparing for a funeral. It seems to be conceded that it is only a matter of a few days until the cause of silver will be laid to rest, never to be resurrected, until the people shall send loyal representatives there to take the place of those who have betrayed them. It is the old story, repeated once too often. Having disposed of the question most vital to the interests of the people, congress will drag along in the old rut, wrangling over the tariff and appropria tion bills, rubbing its eyes and scratch ing its head over the frequent shakings up it will receive from the Populists. In tbe bouse the week has been nearly all spent in the discussion and adoption of a eet of rules. This is not finished. The silver men succeeded in passing a rule which will make it impossible for the goldites to impede ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

2 THE ADVOCATE. LYING TEXT BOOXS. The Science of Finance as Expounded in a School History. Editob Advocate: In looking over a United States history, written by Alex ander Johnson, LL. D., author ot "His tory of American Politics," and professor in Princeton college, I find, on page 390, in relation to demonetization of silver, the following paragraph: "If 'men who owe money to workmen or others have a choice of paying in gold dollars, worth 100 cents, or in silver dol lars, worth 85 cents, they will prefer to pay in silver. To prevent such opera tions, many countries had demonetized silver, that is, had passed laws providing that debts should be paid, for the fu ture, in gold. To prevent countries from sending all their useless silver to the United States, congress also demone tized silver in 1873." A man with as large a handle to his name aa Mr. Johnson carries can hardly offer ignorance as an excuse for such misstatement of faota. You will notice that he gives as the reasons for d...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

THE ADVOCATE. THE VOTHG ON SILYEE. Last weeks's report of the voting on the amendments to theTilson bill and the bill itself 'contained soma slight errors in figures: On the proposed ratio of 16 to 1 the vote was: Yeas, 124; nays, 227. On the ratio of 17 to 1 Yeas, 101; nays, 241; not voting, 1L On the ratio of 18 to 1 Yeas, 103; nays, 238; not voting, 12. On the ratio of 19 to 1 Yeas, 104; nays, 238; not voting, 11. On the ratio of 20 to 1 Yeas, 121; nays, 222; not voting, 10. On the substitution of the Bland-Alli-sou act Yeas, 13G; nays, 213; not vot ing, 4. On the Wilson bill to repeal the pur chasing clause of the Sherman act Yeas, 240; nays, 108; not voting, 6. All Kansas members voted for the 16 to 1 amendment and all voted against the Wilson bill Those who voted neither for nor against the 17 to 1 ratio were Baker, Davis, Hudson and Simpson, of Kansas, Cannon, of California; Boen, of Minnesota; Cooper, of Wisconsin; Gra ham, of New! York; Kern, of Nebraska; Pence, of Colorado...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

4 THE .ADVOCATE, AITD TOPEKA TEIBUHE. OFFICIAL STATE PAPER. N. 1Z. I. A. PUBLISHED 1VKBT WlDJfXSDAY BY THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHES C01IPM, Rooms 43 and 5 Knox Building, TOPEKA, . . . KANSAS. $1.00 'PER TEAK. ADVERTUSINO RATX3. For single Insertion : Display matter, 20 cents per line, i nnei w tne men. Keaaing nonces, 40 eenta per line. Dlicoont for long-time oon- tracti. ) Ind. Rural Press Assoo'n, Chicago Office r. u. vanVlmt, Mgr. ) Boyoe Building. Entered at tbe postofflceat Topeka, Kansas, aa secona cuua matter. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1833. - REPUBLICANS IK COUNCIL. The republican state central com mittee has been heard from. Not in very loud or enthusiastic tones, it is true, but it has been heard from. What there was left of it met last week at the Gopeland hotel, the seat of last winter's disastrous campaign. The remnant was composed of the old timers who haven't grasped a new idea in the last twenty years, and the young fellows who are ambitious to get their names before the pub...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

TECEi ADVOCATE. 5 WASHINGTON COEBESPONDENOE. My statement ia the Advocate that Secretary Carlisle should be im peached for willful violation of law, seems to have stirred up the animals both of democratic and republican lineage and provoked considerable adverse criticism. Let us see if there is any ground tot it. Senator Sherman, in the United States senate, July 8, 1890, discussing the clause of the act approved July 14, 1890, which relates to the pur chase of silver bullion, said that much to his regret the amount to be purchased had been made more than the American product. "It has been made mandatory (not permissive) on the secretary of the treasury to buy 4,500,000 ounces each month." Oq July 9 he said: The view of the conference oommittee was that the secretary of the treasury would be bound to buy 4,500,000 ounoes of silver per month at the market price, and that his failure to do so would be a breach of public duty. Now, if it was the view of the con ference committee at tha...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

6 ME. PEUOE BOASTS HB.BYHUH. One of the most amusing scones that has occurred since the present special session of congress assembled took place in the house on August 21, when Mr. Pence, of Colorado, took occasion to scourge Mr. Bynum, of Indiana, for his sudden change of front upon the silver question. Mr. Pence's remarks are worthy of repro duction in full and they are here ap pended as follows: Mr. Pence Mr. Speaker, under the five minute rule I have but a word or two to say. I know that the house has been al ready too kind to me. Bat, raised as I was in the Indiana school, and allied as I am by matrimony with the Eentuoky school, I could not let even this short opportunity pas3 by without expressing my opinions and feelings respecting the utterances of certain of the Hoosier and Eentuoky statesmen on this floor. I do not desire to take the time of the house in any discussion of the merits of this question. I am a little bit dis couraged, and my people are; and we have reason to...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

lIEI ADVOOATB. LET THE LIGHT SHINE. ! This scission of congress is marked Dy an attempt on the part of members to array the west against the east. Let the teaohers everywhere stand firm against this effort. A long, desolating blighting war grew out of a similar effort to array the south against the north. There is such a thing as a "silver" question; let congress spend its time in de bating that. The truth is that certain men at the south and west are trying to build up a political party in which they shall appear as leaders; they are trying to do this by ap pealing to the prejudices of men; they have been Dartiallv Buooeesf ul. Next, they try to have this party so built as to believe that the East is opposed to the purohase oi saver by the government in order to oppress the west. Teacher?, let the light shine in your school rooms. Kellogg's Sohool J ournal. By all means let the light shine, and let it shine on the teaohers and on the so-called educational journals first It is just ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

8 TBC233 ADVOCATE. EAST AND WEST. A Breach That Can be Healed by a Change in the Policy of Congress, The eastern press has settled down on the presumption that the western peo ple are always under obligations to the east for financial aid rendered in the way of loans, and that any movement on the part of the weatb better its condition is simply a step toward secession. From this standpoint New York papers talk in cessantly, and it seems as if they intend to keep it up until their sentiment is either approved or denounced by a tote of the whole people. The New York Herald of Saptember 1 contains the following: "The evidences of sectional feeling which prompts men to band together iu common cause against anything emanat ing from another section have in them food for profound thought. Has the time arrived when the business interests of the west are directly antagonistic to the business interests of the east? Does the commercial supremacy of one section of the country depend upon the pr...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

i-HE ADVOCATE. 9 COMPOUND INTEBEST. Some Startling Figures for "Advocate" Students to Digest. Editor Advocate: One dollar at compound interest at the rate of 10 per cent, per annum will double in about seven and one-third years. If $1 had been placed at compound interest at 10 per cent, at the beginning of the Chris tian era it would now have doubled 260 times. The 260th power of 2 is, in round numbers, three quadrillion vigintillions. At 2 per cent interest money will double very nearly three times in a century, so that$l at compound interest at 2 per cent will in 9,000 years amount to about the same as at 10 per cent, for 1,893 years, and would be equal to three quad rillion vigintillions of dollars. This would make a solid ball of pure gold whose diameter would be more than a septillion of miles. If the sun and all the planets, with their satellites, and all the fixed stars which are visible in the most powerful telescope (on the hypothe sis that each star is 100 times as large a...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

10 ADVOCATE. DID GREEEBAOIS DEF&EOI&TE? ' Why Wasta Time Endeayoring to Ex plain That Which Never Happened?'1 riho Ottawa Journal and the Iola Resis' hare lately been engaged in a ceased ot ter 000 troversy over the money question, each of them offering copious explanations as to why the greenback depreciated dartng the war. Whereupon ueo. u. wara Buomiw wo following to show that there waa nosuoh depreciation. JSd.j It appears to me that time and efforts spent in an attempt to explain the cause of the supposed depreciation of the greenback during the suspension of epecie payments, partakes very much of the nature of "love's labor lost." If it should turn out that time and efforts - so spent are spent in an attempt to ex plain the cause of an event that never happened and to account for a fact that really never existed, then indeed would the whole controversy resolve itself into a new version of "Much ado about noth iog." I have always taken it for granted that the popular op...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

THE ADVOCATE. 11 Thoughts on Money and Debts.' Editor Advocate: The formation of a debt presupposes that that for which the debt was made was not in the pos session of the party who made the debt After a debt is made the party mak ing it must afterward make or produce the money or property to discharge the debt, or it cannot be paid, and, of course, the debt is so much assumed wealth to the credit of the debtor. While, in fact, there is no increase of wealth until an - equal amount of wealth is produced with which to discharge the debt. Therefore, the very palpable mistake that some of the "Stand up for Kansas" wiseacres have made in declaring that "our debts represent our wealth." In the case of an individual, a debt may be formed and the wealth may afterward be produoed,and thus the debt be discharged. But in the case of a na tion forming a debt it is a different thing. The nation needs supplies and proceeds to buy them by giving her bond, if she, has not the money, as se curity, ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 6 September 1893

12 THE ADVOCATE. The Congressional Funeral. (Continued from page 1.) votes in congress, and in conventions be fcrb and after the proposed repeal.would form a contrast that would put to shame the wonder inspiring patent meoicine advertisements "before and after tak ing." In regard to Senator Gorman's change of front, he said he believed he would be condemned out of his own mouth, and would be compelled to say, like the wild-eyed, long-haired man who accompanied the temperance lecturer "I goes along to serve as a frightful ex ample." Giving and taking was fair, but when one side did all the giving and the nfhA oirfo all f Via folrincr it. nmnnntAd to VVUOt U IUU IU VMW vmmq, aw a surrender. Thirty days from this time all obstructions to the business of the world would have passed away, and to day, according to the leading financial papers, an upward tendency was every where manifested. He called upon his friends to take heart and stand by the object of their love a little while longer...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
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