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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

September/October 1992 Healthcare Coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums Does Your Policy Provide? $5,000,000 Medical Coverage? Our plan provides up to $5,000,000 in lifetime benefits for covered services. ''i Kra [gHSS n An Annual Out of Pocket Limit rhe Maximum you will personally pay toward covered servicer, in any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, (for option 0 Dental Coverage Included Coverage for restorative and preventative dentistry. Prescription Drug Card f Just show your card at participating pharmacies for immediate coverage. Supplemental Accident Benefits Additional benefits paid for accidental injury. Low Rates A wide range of options to meet your budget needs. Entry Age Rating Your rates wouldn't go up just because you become older. 92 Service Offices To provide you personal sen/ice. Policy Form 110896 If your current healthcare policy doesn't provide you all of the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

Breakfast: Jump start your day the healthy way Breakfast can be the most critical meal of the day for both children and adults. Unfortunately, it's the meal NewWellness for Farm Bureau Bpr p^"1 '"I r m dren who skip breakfast are less attentive Jeanine M. Sherry, M.S.,R.D. * nd ™ ore President. NewWellness Inc. ktigued in school than classmates who consume a morning meal. Adults who skip breakfast may also find their morning performance compromised. In addition, breakfast-skippers may have problems trying to lose weight since their metabolism stays sluggish until lunch, when they eat more calories than usual since they're starving. As your family heads back into daily work and school routines this fall, make sure they're getting started the right way. To provide for the best physical and mental performance, a breakfast should contain both protein (lean meats, dairy products) and carbohydrate (breads, cereals and fruits), so that blood-sugar levels remain elevated until lunch. A meal...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

September/October 1992 Boucher (Continued from Page 10) passed which excludes tobacco industry participation in the USDA Market Promotion Program (MPP). I continue to support other avenues of overseas market expansion for tobacco, and will work to see tobacco reinstated to MPP. I advocate alowing farmers to have the maximum number of crop protection choices while maintaining maximum food safety, and I advocate cooperative conservation efforts by farmers and government. V\fe must make every effort to ensure the continued growth of the agriculture industry. Growth of the agriculture industry means growth for our nation's economy. QUESTION 4 types of wetlands. Farmers were the original land conservationists. I am currently .working with my colleagues to enact measures designed to provide a balanced approach to wetlands management by protecting both the environment and the rights of private property owners. Butler (Continued from Page 8) QUESTION 1 Secondly, we need to override state in...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

14 Cotton (Continued from Page 1) excellent chance of taking a large chunk of the market share from Southwestern growers, who have traditionally produced lower grades of cotton, Dr. Jones said. But that won't happen if local growers don't aa quickly to build a reputation for top quality cotton, she predicted, whether or not they're paid a premium at ginning time this year. In addition to raising the right varieties and keeping the crop clean, Dr. Jones said Vote yes (Continued from Page 2) Virginia's position in the bond markets will actually strengthen. Passage of these bond referenda demonstrates our commitment to invest in the resources to attract new industry and jobs. The use of this bond money is determined by our citizens. These bond proceeds can only be used for the particular projects designated. They cannot be diverted to any other use. Importantly, taxes will not have to be raised to pay for these bonds. Passage of the referenda will allow the state to meet its obligation...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

September/October 1992 REGISTERED GELBVEH BULLS. 7 to choose from. Ages 3 years to 1 year. Call 703-783-6090. FOR SALE—Bred heifers, Angus, some registereo Call 804-848-0704. REGISTERED PINZGAUER BULLS. Weaned, with al their shots. Cal Baker's Pinzgauers, 703-669-1245 or 703-466-3540. 11 REGISTERED PUREBRED CHAROLAIS buds, ready for service. Cal Oakdale Farm, 703-592-3323. BULLS—Registered Angus, various ages. For rent or sale. Graperidge Farm, Goochland, VA. 23063. 3 OUTSTANDING PUREBRED ANGUS heifers. Top brood cow prospects with good performance. $550 each. 804-823-4900. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN service age bulls. Also open and bred females. 703-825-0590. WANTED—sIow, down and crippled cattle. 804-352-5846 or 352-7352. EXCELLENT YOUNG PUREBRED Angus bull. Ready for service. Performance breeding, $800. 804-823-4900. ARAB GELDING—show pleasure, great trail horse, jumps, 143 H, 11 yrs., no vices, $1,850.804-709-3939. REGISTERED MORGANS. 8 yr. old chestnut mare. 2 bay yearling col...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

— lawwMiimawrawsww^BwwrewwEWWHWwaßWWßßMWß^ Farm Bureau «, . ... . ... ~ ......... . ~....„:. .. :, ..:.:. .■ ■ ........... . ....,:. ~»,...' . .. , - ...„■• ~..■• ~. -<.• ~ v.. .. ~,.. „ ii, - -,:rf (804) 788-1234 — Helping You Is What — We Do Best* anHMBBr - »fB 9h9^BL' ' • • - ->*•». - >,--, *•- d' • -": -.:v ; . ?& ' : T? ** * ~w -~ - *• ■>' 'r>- - «K 'jaWMßgl^wßMWiMßfrwat^WW^^ v.- -^•' i Hi 1., •• ,i' i'i H 1 -i r . 2 ■ Si mil -■ BHBBBBBBBHfIi Vol. 51, No. 8 THE VOICE OF VRGNA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS Septembar/October 1992 AUTO • HOMEOWNERS • LIFE Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company Early Settlers Insurance Company Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company Southern Farm Bureau Annuity Insurance Company 200 West Grace Street P.O. Box 27552 Richmond, Virsinia 23261 Mfe. m Dog days Although not offictafty a dog day, It was hot enough In Prince Edward County Jidy 24 for this friendy farm dog who greeted ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

. • i , •"•'•'•• . 'V •' ' > ••. • •'" ••-.• •' -■ >v \•> M . ~■ . • i . ' . ' " : i. ■• V,;: V .: • " : " / 3, I L^ BL. ■HL3AJHHK» hh J| IBmBmI BBLb»--jflBBHHBI _ _ I I I |H .;■ JHk ' ' : ~iilHHiM^^^^'^- ;: '*^lHV^HHßPSiiHHHlw^Sll^^Nl^^Hiii^^^^HK^^Hil^wll^BF*3> Vol. 51, No. 9 Building progress for the future In photo below, Board members (L to R) Hershel Gardner, S. Spottswood Taliaferro and Marvin Everett look around the new Farm Bureau building at West Creek in Goochland County, while other board members climb scaffolding to get a better look. ■nv~— ~ Farmers came out in force for child labor hearings By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor WINCHESTER —Virginia farmers were upset over new child labor regulations concerning farm work that went into effect July 1. To show how upset they were, they came out in force to five Virginia Department of Labor and Industry hearings across the state during September and early October. The hearings had b...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

2 Farmers' testimonies may reverse new child labor regs Farm life is truly a special way of life. Families work together, neighbors help neighbors, children develop a strong sense of responsibility at a young age, teen-agers learn the value of the work ethic, and many later realize they want to pursue careers in the diverse agricultural industry. This life, I can attest, is one of the most cherished of all. Recently, new state regulations threatened to take qualified workers off the form, while at the same time destroying many aspects of that wonderful lifestyle. Created by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry, the new regulations went into effect July 1. They raised the minimum age from 16 years of age to 18 for any teens operating "hazardous machinery" on the farm. Young adults who live on the farm with their parents are exempt from these new burdens. But thanks to testimony from our farmers around the state, there is a good chance these new regulations will be rescinded....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

November 1992 Donations to Ag in the Classroom are now tax deductible By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Edttor RICHMOND —Since the Virginia Foundation for Ag in the Classroom was given tax exempt status Aug. 24, donations to the foundation are now tax deductible. "There was never a doubt that we would get it (tax exempt status)," said Jane Futch, coordinator for the state's Ag in the Classroom program. "But it's still exciting and it's a good selling point." The selling point is that any individuals or corporations giving a donation to the foundation can deduct that amount on their income tax forms. Ms. Futch needs some selling points to help her raise funds for the foundation, which was established in January to monetarily support the Ag in the Classroom program. Specifically, she hopes that the money raised will cover the costs of printed educational materials, help pay for workshops, provide a salary for a fulltime coordinator, and pay for an expansion of the program to include mat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

4 Nov. 4-5: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Resolutions committee meeting, Sheraton Hotel, Charlottesville. Contact Alex Hamilton, 804-225-7531. Nov. 5-6: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee meeting, Charlottesville. Contact Sandy Bennett, 804-225-7544. Nov. 5-6: Virginia GIS 2000: Creating Effective Governance Through Partnerships conference, Waterside Marriott Hotel, Norfolk. Showcasing the latest concepts related to using the computer-driven Geographic Information System. Contact Paul Fisher, 804-728-2067. Nov. 6-7: 35th Annual Urbanna Oyster Festival. Call 804-758-5540. Nov. 6-8: Virginia Equipment Dealers Association fall management conference, Hyatt Hotel, Richmond. Call 804-379-2099. Nov. 6-8: Regional 4-H Dairy Bowl, Regional 4-H and FFA Dairy Judging Contest, Louisville, KY. Contact Dennis Hartman, Virginia Tech, 703-231-4764. Nov. 7: Pet Bird Fair, Hampton. Educational forum for bird owners, sponsored by the Peninsula Caged Bird Society. Contact Dick Ivy, P.O...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

November 1992 Labor and education are Bil Freeman's two main concerns By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Edtor PEMBROKE—If William P. "Bill" Freeman didn't have any Grimes Goldens, he'd be in trouble. "I guess if we didn't have them, we'd have to move out of Virginia,'' Freeman said with a laugh. On board That's his interpretation of how the older people in this western Virginia town would feel if he and his wife didn't grow Grimes Golden apples on Doe Creek Farm, their 570-acre farm and orchard. Grimes Goldens are the staples for homemade apple butter and apple sauce, Freeman explained. And just like a certain variety of apples are important to Freeman's customers, allowing teens to work on farms is a high priority for Freeman and a lot of other farmers. If the highly controversial child labor laws aren't reversed, farmers, in effect, won't be able to hire anyone under 18 years old to work on their farms or even let their children's friends help out. (See Between the Rows, Page 2) Fre...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

6 Pumpkins have become a symbol of bountiful harvest Bright orange pumpkins evoke images of the autumn holidays: Halloween illuminated by the glow from jack-o'-lanterns; or Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims sitting down to a feast that included pumpkin pie. Pumpkins have become a symbol of a bountiful harvest and they remind many of us of our ties with the European settlers of this country. But the notion that pumpkin pie was part of the first Thanksgiving dinner is a revisionist one. The pumpkin "pie'' of Colonial time was made by cutting a hole in the side of the fruit, removing its seeds and fibers, stuffing the cavity with apples and spices, then baking it. The word "pompion" (which later became pumpkin) referred to both winter squashes and pumpkins around the time of the first Thanksgiving. Today's botanists quibble over the precise definition of a true pumpkin because many varieties commonly considered pumpkins are technically winter squashes. Upon close inspection, pumpkins are ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

November 1992 Convention '92:100,000 Families Strong November 30-December 3, 1992 • Richmond Marriott • Special Pullout Section Virginia lech official, AFBF economist to address the future By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Edtor RICHMOND —Dr. L. Andy Swiger, interim dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, and John K. Hosemann, chief economist and economic research director for the American Farm Bureau Federation, will explore the future during their keynote speeches on the third day of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 67th Annual Convention. Hosemann will talk about the future of farmers and their property rights, while Swiger will discuss the future of Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and its programs. Hosemann, who was appointed chief economist for AFBF in 1992, has worked for the Farm Bureau for the past 19 years. In his current position, he and three staff economists are responsible for research and analysis into the econ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

8 Local news anchor to speak at women's luncheon By GREG HCKS VFBF Communications Director RICHMOND —One of Virginia's most popular television news anchors will address Farm Bureau women during the organization s annual luncheon Dec. 1 at the Marriott. Lisa Lafata, coanchor of WTVRTV6's6p.m. and 11 p.m. nightly newscasts, will speak to approximately 300 farm women on "Local Television Today.'' The luncheon is part of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 67th Annual Convention. Lafata was Richmond's first woman to solely anchor a nightly newscast, and is well-known in the area for her community contributions. The popular Ms. Lafata has been honored numerous times by the Viiginia Associated Press for her individual reporting abilities. She has taken first place awards for a series of reports on crime and potential solutions to violence in the inner city and for an in-depth study of' 'slum-lords'' and the lives they Hero to give inspirational speech at Wednesday night banquet (Continu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

November 1992 C. Wayne Ashworth Three officers, four directors up for re-election Dec. 3 By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —Elections for Virginia Farm Bureau Federation president, vice president and five seats on the board of directors will be held Dec. 3 at the VFBF Convention in Richmond. Approximately 275 voting delegates to the 67th annual convention will elect board members from Districts 3,6,9 and 12, and a Women's Committee chairman to sit on the board without a district. The president and vice president serve two-year terms, while district directors' terms are three years. The Women's Committee chairman is elected annually. At press time, the seven incumbents were running unopposed. The following are brief backgrounds on them: PRESIDENT C. Wayne Ashworth, a Pittsylvania tobacco grower, was elected VFBF president in 1988 for a two-year term and was re-elected in 1990 for another. He has served as president of the Pittsylvania County Farm Bureau and as chairman ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

10 There's something for everyone to do in Richmond RICHMOND —When you're not attending the 67th Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Convention at the Richmond Marriott, sth and Broad streets, there are an endless number of places to see and things to do while you're in the city. For example, the city's 6th Street Marketplace— a two-story shopping area which houses artists' studios, shops and boutiques, and a food court —is less than a block from the Marriott, easily within walking distance. If shopping s not your thing, then you might take in a show at the Carpenter Center For the Performing Arts. The Carpenter Center, which hosts performances of the Virginia Opera, the Richmond Ballet and the Richmond Symphony, is also less than a block away from the hotel. Within a dozen blocks from the Marriott is historic Shockoe Slip with its cobblestone streets and renovated warehouses. In this area you will find fine restaurants such as The Tobacco Company and Peking Restaurant. If you travel do...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

November 1992 Beef and pork make light meals NewWellness for Farm Bureau Jeanine M. Sherry, M.5..R.0. President, NewWefciess Inc. Thanksgiving is headed our way and with it come thoughts of turkey, turkey and more turkey. But poultry doesn't have to hog the spotlight when it comes to lean protein sources—beef and pork can offer taste and nutritional variety without a lot of excess fiat and cholesterol. Thanks to new feeding and breeding practices and better trimming of meat cuts at the retail level, today's beef and pork is much leaner than what we bought in the 1980s. Beef is now about 27 percent lower in fat than it was 10 years ago, while pork has slimmed down an impressive 31 percent. The 6 leanest cuts of beef and pork are called the "skinny six." They include eye round, round tip, tenderloin, top loin, top round and top sirloin for beef and boneless loin roast, boneless sirloin chop, center loin chop, center rib chop, tenderloin and top loin chop cuts of pork. All six cuts of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

12 Healthcare | -•- " ' • Mnny iirt'iKi ioncjor < ih)i(; to ; iflc >r (i rr u (iir- )i jr if,( tn,. -j , of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums Does Your Virginia Farm Your Current Policy Provide? Bureau Coverage Policy Coverage $5,000,000 Medical Coverage? Our plan provides up to $5,000,000 in lifetime benefits for covered services. j An Annual Out of Pocket Limit r-V| ~ The Maximum you will personally pay toward covered services Wr in any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, (tor option I) Dental Coverage Included Coverage for restorative and preventative dentistry. Mr Prescription Drug Card Just show your card at participating pharmacies for immediate coverage. Supplemental Accident Benefits WjT Additional benefits paid for accidental injury. Mr Low Rates A wide range ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

November 1992 Hogs need dean (Continued from Page 1) in 1990 that the Martins signed an agreement to become producers for Carroll's. Delivery of the 222 pigs was the official beginning of the operation. The Martins are the first Virginia farm family to begin contract hog farming for the national pork processor, SmithfieldCaroll's Foods Inc. State Water Control Board permits are pending for farmers in Halifax, Pittsylvania, Nottoway and King William counties. Child regs opposed (Continued from Page 1) most mechanized farm equipment, even small machinery like post hole diggers, brush cutters and chain saws. Teens working on their own family farm or employed in a cooperative training program are exempt. A common complaint from audience members was that the new restrictions on teen-age farmworkers go against the grain of the American work ethic at the very time young people need good values. "When kids have enough gumption to get up off their backsides and get a job, we ought to be enco...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1992

14 PUREBRED HElFEßS—Jerseys and red & white Holstein. Open & bred. 703-947-5483 BRAHAM—grey registered. Gentle, 4 cows, 1 bul, 1 heifer. 804-598-5425. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD heifers, 1-cash flow & 1-enforcer 3N, $850 each. 703-639-1860. REGISTERED—BIack, red & poled Gefovieh buls. Smyth County, VA. Cal 703-783-6100 evenings. FOR SALE—Registered poled Hereford buls, 22 months, Crewe VA. Ph. 804-645-9193 ANGUS PUREBRED—two-year buls and open heifers. Power play. Intermont Farm, Staunton. 703-886-6187. REGISTERED PINZGAUER BULLS—IO months old, wormed, with al their shots. 703-669-1245 or 703-446-3540. TWO REGISTERED BULLS—Simmental and Charolais. Good health and good disposition. Call anytime, 804-492-5735. WANT TO BUY—feeder calves for Lawrencevie area. 804-848-0704. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN buls. Service age. Also open and bred females. 703-825-0590. FOR RENT OR SALE—Buls, registered Angus. Box 115, Goochland, VA. 23063. 804-556-...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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