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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Holder for Flexible Lamp Cord. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Holder for Flexible Lamp Cord. 1 The holder is mado of a round stick—a piccc of a broom handle will do—ns shown in Fig. 1. It is nbout tin. long with two not ches cut out for the strands of the cord. These holders are easily mado nnd will answer the purpose almost ns w'ell as the onos made in porcelain, Fainting or enameling will improve not only their appear ance, but nlso their insulating pro perties. Several of them can bo used along a line, ns shown in Tig. 2. ■i.v'JVo costers were in the Jlritish Museum, looking at the statue of a Homun gladiator. • One of its arms was broken off, his left leg ended at the kneo, his helmet was battered, and there were several chips' from' the face of the warrior. Under neath the statue was an" inscription, "Victory." "Lor' lumiue, 11111," :suid tho gen tleman in pearlies, "if ;• that; .. thero bloke won the' VictoryTwhnt.-must 'a been the state of the :■ blokewhnl lo«t 1"

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CREATION OF THE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

} | CREATION OP THE WORLD. j A tablet dug up in the* Nippur some years ago, has just been trans lated by Dr. Arno Poebcl, of Penn sylvania. University, who believes that he has unveiled the oldest 6tory so far known of the creation. The tablet dates back to the reign of Hammurabi, about 7000 B.C. The record reads like a new version of Genesis, with this important differ ence, the creator ol the world is de scribed as a goddess, and not a god. Dr. Poebcl is engaged in checklu^ his translation. He says the ta\l.t depicts a goddess quite clearly, and speaks of two male gods as relative ly unimportant. The tablet, we are assured, gives probably the first story of the wor'd's creation, and also the most wonderful accounts of civilisation in 7100 ll;C.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHE WRITES UPSIBE-DOWN. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

t SHE WRITES UPSIBE-DOWN. —-—• After rccent disclosures of start lingly unusual., children who writ® i nu'I see things upside down, now i comes the story of a twelve-year l old Binninghan girl who has hod i an uncontrollable, impulse to " do i tliii.irs backwards/' i Her education lias made little pro grc.ss owing to this strange |x?r' verseness, which ha* sometimes im pelled her to write from right to left. ; .The doctors conjectured that there was some physiological abnormal* ity, and the X-rays have now dis closed the secret of the child's ec centricities. When the rays were ap | plied it was found that the heart | waa on tho right side of the body, niul that other organ*, including the brain, were misplaced.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why We Write L. S. D. ORIGINS OF EVERYWAY SIGNS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Why We Write L. S. D. 4 ORIGIN'S OF EVERYWAY SIONS. There arc all Boris oud kinds of familiar signs which arc often seen in books and ^newspapers, and which are frequently used in • writing,,the meanings of which arc well-known, but as to how they came to be used few people are able-to say. Kor instance, money signs for pounds, shillings, ami pence are al ways indicated by three letters— L s. d.—which originate from the Latin words librae, solidi, ftnd de narii, and which mean pounds, shill ings, and pence, the initial letters being taken in each case to give the sign so often, used. The let ters lb, for pounds, of weight, is made up of the first and third let ters of the Latin word librae. In the short cwt. for hundred weight, and dwt.' for pennyweight, the wt is an abbreviation- of weight the first and last letters being, the accepted;rule—and thac is the Latin numeral for. a hundred,v and : d is used as the first -letter.- of. ^lenar ius, a penny. ^ 4 Ox. is the short for ounce.'...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GATEWAY OF THE EAST. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

the gateway of the EAST. Twelve days at sea from Birken head on the ocean highway to Bom (uiv will .sec you passing the famous statue of He Lu'Jsi.'i'is', which looks ovi-r Past the ramshackle build ings ot fort Said to the entrance of tlw famous Suez Canal, of which he was, as everyone knows, the engi neer T0 a Western eye, as yet unfa miliar with (hc'fttscinatinif mid in congruous F.ast, i'ort Said offers the first glimpse of Krtstern life, nnii the conditions under which exist ence is maintained .under hot sun. Hitherto you have been accustomed to clrmneys—here nre none ! Thin, i ci'lmfix, is the first thi/ifr that is noted us the liner draws up to her moorings opposite.' the landing plnces : the next is n babel of voices iilongside, as numberless boats rush nI ross the short distance from the .•shore carrying all the oddments of humanity who make a living from the pockets of lCostom travellers. Here they come ! Arabs in long blue robes selling; postcards, Turkish delight, neckla...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Back to the Land. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Back to the Land. I There aro too many "dreamers and I thinkers/' Ami not aaough tillers of the »oil; Thero are too niaoy eaters and drinkers Who use up the pratincti of toil; Then? nre too many l>oost«rs and Isomers, I With manners too eaay a&d bland ; ' We're cursed . with too many con sumers. We ought to go back to the land. There are too many getters and takers, And not, enough men who producc ; There are too many broad rolling acres i bntouched and witHled—out of use; We stick where the grime and the grit is. And the streets with the poor are a-swarm; We're crowded too much hi the cttien, We ought to go back to the farm. We've got to be workers and ploughers, Who sweat in the fields like true men ; We've got to make use of our powers To make the land blossom again. What, me ? On a farm ? And to stay there ? Well, not for a bundle of pelf ! I was trying to show you the way there. Hut I'll stick to the city myself.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WATCH'S WORK. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

THE WATCH'S WORK. The vrork a watch will do in Ion years is surprising. In that time, which includes two lonp years, and consequently a total of 3,65- days, the hour hand has made 7,<101 and the minute hand 87,(348 revolutions. The end of an average minute hand travels over 10,820 yards—ovor six miles. 'Hie second hand has mado 5,258,880 revolutions, and its ex tremity has traversed on the dial a distance of upwards of 12.'! miles. The escape wheel has made 02, 588,800 revolutions, and, as it has fifteen teeth, it has come 788,923, 000 times in contact with each pal let. The halancc has mado 1,577, 041,000 vibrations, and any point on the outside of the rim lias cov? nod a distance of about 50,000 miles; mid that is euual to twice the circumference of the caith. . v\ Anions clerical anecdotes is that of the vicar and the curate who had. quarrelled, and the curaie <waS re quested to find some other congre gation to minister to. He, there fore, preached his farew...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PENNY-IN-THE-SLOT METER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

! PENNY-IN-THE-RLOT METKR. Tbe most ingenious means of de frauding a penny-in-the-slot miter, has been discovered in Honolulu. The local, gas company recently found that one of their customers was un doubtedly consuming'large quantities of gas, although no coins were ever found in the meter. Baffled in their attempts to discov er tbe fraud, tbe company at offered to pay the man for bis sccrrt, at the same time guarantying him against prosecution. He then shown! them a mould the exact size of the copper coin used for the meter and an ice machine. He explained tint with these he made a disc of ic\ which he put into the meter to re lease a supply of gas. The disc then melted and the water dried up, so that when the meter came to he open ed there was nothing inside.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SMALLER THAN TOM THUMB. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

SMALLER THAN TOM THl'MH. One of the smallest men in the world, Mr. John Willian White, who was but 21 inches in hcipht, died at his residence at Marine Parade, Southend-on-Sea, aged fifty-three years. For many years he kept a confec tionery business, bis two sisters, who arc of normal height, residing with him. He whs most popular with visi tors, beinc well educated and intel lectual. He was an ardent politician. Other dwarfs of the past h ive 1 en: Jeffrey Hudson, favourite of Charlw I., "served up" in a raised pie. Don Francisco Hidalgo, Span:aTd, 211 inches. Jan Hannema, Dutchman, 28 incbcs. Count Joseph Bornwlaski, Pole, 39 . inchcs. | "General" Tom Thumb, United • States, 31 inches. Miss Warren, his wife, 32 inches. "General" Mito, stated to bo 21 inches. "Field-Marshal" Tom Thumb, 36 inches. Marie Jeannette, France, 23 inchop. Mile. Anita, Hungary, 2*3 inches.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MOTOR-DRIVEN SAFETY-RAZOR. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

motor-driven safety-razoh. A safety-razor, connected to a mo tor by means of a flexible shaft, is the latest invention to simplify shav ing. The blades are actuated in such a way an to cut the beard by impart or blown. The blades, therefore, <1" not need to be so sharp as iti h-md shaving. tfo soap is necesssrv, wot ting the skin being sufiici nt, an 1 •» clean shave can be accomplish"'!. it is declared, in a very short timo. The after-eflecls are descried an 1,r' ing those following a nr'ld niiissace. A plug is provided for attaching the razor to any lamp socket.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FAMJUS CHAIN LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

THE FAMJUS CHAIN LETTER. Sisteen years or so ago, a man named Griffin, mayor of a small town in New South Wales, started a chain j letter in the' name ol his daughter, with the idea of endowing a hospital | with the proceeds. The plan was to j construct a ISO link chain by Mi s ; Griffin writing to three of her friends : and asking them to send her ten used | postage stamps, and alio asking ! them each to write to three of their friends to do the earns. The idea was ' eventually to sell the cancelled pos ' tage stamps received to a stamp : dealer for re-sale to collectors, and to use the money thus gained for the hospital. The first three recipients : numbered their letters So. 1, the second nine numbered theirs No. 2, the third twenty-seven numbered theirs Xo. 3 and so on. With the one hundred and eightieth multiple, the chain was automatically to cease. But the originator evidently went into the matter wholly without con sidering the results .of this arithme tical progression. As ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Telephonic Information. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Telephonic Information. : Telephone Charges for conversations be tween COB RAM and the undermentioned places — di t Eirflt 3 miu. mln, Ardinonft ... !/• ..AOd Barooga ... 2d . ..1 2d lionallu ... 1 • . . Od Berrigan ,,, ... 8d . . fid Corowa ... ... 1/. . . 9d Ooigrove ... ... 8d . . Od Deniliqnin - !/• . ... 1/- . .. Od Dcvcni&h ,,, . Od Ecliuctt ... • ... iA . . V Finley ... (w . . 3d Kataumtitd ... ... 8(1 . . Od Eatunga ... 2d . ."2d Mulwftlft ... Cd . . 4d Mooroopna ... „. Sd .. . Cd ffuuiurkab ... ... 4<J . . 8d Nuthulift ... 8d . . Od Sheppaiton ... ... 8d .•■■Od Strathmerton ... ... 2d . . 2d Tonmiwnl ,,, '... 2d : . " 2il Tun^nnmh ,,, ... 8d . . Od ...\ 8d . . Od "K'u. ^hnu ... 'W . . 3d Yarrawongft ... 4d . . 3d Yarroweyah ... 2d . . 2d Jerilderio ... ... 1/- . . Od Calls between subscribers bolongingVto Cobram Exchange aro charged for at th ate of 2 calls u penny. Medical ppictitioners eonnneted with tele phono exchanges, at which h day service only is ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TEACHING MAORIS AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

TEACHING MAORIS AGRICUL TURE. There has been established at Ma nanui, in New Zealand, an Agricul tural College for Maori boys, which consists of some two hundred acrcs of first-class land, about seventy of which arc already under cultivation. Practical as well as theoretical training is given, and dairying is to be a prominent feature of the insti tution. at which the hoys live, and which is under the principalship of a clergyman of some considerable ex perience in practical agriculture. Adult Maori settlers, it is int^res; ing to note, arc realising the possibi lities of prosperity in dairying. The majority of those who take it up seriously use milking machines. The Belgians are the greatest po tato-eaters in the world, and the Irish come second.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Cordon Anderson, Carrier, Forwarding Agent and Livery Stable Proprietor, IIA 3 Two Motor Cars (Maxwell And Metz) Seating Fire and Three, containing the latest Ijnprorement*, and ia prepared to hire same to Travellers or Tourists oo reasonable terms Address—VICTORIA HOTEL, COBIU1L King up Phono N«. 9. YOUR GIFT? Ssrvou JUST 1D To w ile for our Handsome GIFT CATALOGUE (il is free), it caotems eurjlbiiig iciable and ittcptiMe for old and jcatig. Barooga Hotel. A» J. ALLEN (Formerly of Yarrowoyah and Yarrawonga) Has taken over the management of tho above hotel, auil estends a hearty wclcome to old and new friends. Only tho Heat Brands of "Wine, Ale, Spirits and Cigars stocked. Good Accommodation for Travellers. FIRST-CLASS TABLE. Cleanliness, Order, Civility and Attention Guaranteed. A CALL WIIiEi BE ESTEEMED. John Marnara and Go,, STOCK. STATION, AND FINANCIAL AGENTS, YARRAWONGA. PROPERTIES always on hand for sale or to let; Clearing Sales conducted personally by Mr Jons McNamaraa, in ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE "OPEN SHIRT." [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

THE "OPEN SHIRT." Australia's High Commissioner, in bidding the Commonwealth "good bye" , nt Frcmantle, touched the weak spot in our industrial life with his customary keenness and surety. "I cannot help thinking," he said, "that wc have been inclined to at tend to the things on the roof of our greatness, rather than the founda tions. Wc want to see our new set tlers go into the country. At present the tendency is to crowd into the towns. It is only, because the fashion is towards high collars and office. I would like to see the fashion tend towards the open shirt." This, in a few words, sums up tUc question of land settlement all over the world. In a vast and rich coun try like Australia, it is strange that the majority seek a crowdcd city life ; lured by the movement and clit ter, and attracted by the genteel jobs which town offices ofler. Our recent system of education has much to answer for this. The boy's energies and ambitions have been forced and. fostered on the clerical sid...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The "Anger" Tree. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

The "Anger" Tree. In Idaho there caIsIs n spe< ies of tlic acacia. tre£ which is entitled to i be classed as one of.the wonders of I plant; life. This tree attains u j height of about 8ft. When full grown, it closes its leaves together in toils each day at sunset, and curls its twigs to the shape of pig tails. When the tree has thus set tled itscif for its Might's skv;>, it ! is said .that, if Louche 1, it will Ilul ,'ter as if agitated or impatient at the disturbance. j K is averred that the oftener the, foliage is molested the more violent ! i will become the shaking of the : [branches. Finally, it is further al i leged, if the shaking is continued. • 'the tree' wiii nt length emit n new- . seating odour quite sufficient to j induce a headache in the case of j the person disturbing the tree. j In Idaho it is cnlled the "anger , tree," and it is said that it was ' discovered by men who, on making j I camp for the night, placed one end i of a canvas covering over one o...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Magic of the East. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

The Magic of the East. Of late years a tendency lu\s boon I evinced to decry and belittle the j astonishing feats of Kastern con- i jurors. Many nf them, of course, j do admit of a feasible explanation, , but there arc others which—well, suffice it to say that the Oriental magic-monger may congratulate him self that in these prosaic times there is no capital sentence for sor- j eery. Here, for instance, is one feat' which has hitherto completely baf fled the scientific Western mind. Imagine yourself, if you plen8'\ lounging with other travellers upon , the verandah of a Cairo hotel. There: approaches a tall, lank personage! of striking appearance, attired in i turban and long cotton gown with loose sleeves, girt round the waist by a rope girdle. lie is an Arab, with' jet-black, piercing eyes deep set in his swarthy visage, and in ) his movements and aspect is ns deliberate and solemn as a High I'riest of IJuddha. Through the me dium of his Kngli.sh-speaKing in terpreter, he expresse...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Prince Arthur's Regiment. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Prince Arthur's Regiment. + The itoyal Scots Greys, in whoso uniform 1'rince Arthur of Con naught was married in the Cliapcl Ito.vol, and au escort of whom at tended the bride and bridegroom after the wedding as they drove away from.. St. .James's, was ori ginally enrolled by Thomas Dal yell as a regiment of dragoons in the year 1091. ITe clothed them in stone-grey coats, for which colour that eccentric veteran had a pre dilection, and for that reason, doubt Jess, the popular mum? " Scots Greys." now oilicially authorised as the title of the regiment, came into vogue. The regiment is called the "Grey Dragoons" in a journal of, the period. , The grey chargers which are the j distinguishing feature of the regi-1 ment's turnout to-day were adopted | some fourteen or fifteen years after , the raising of the corps, during' William JII.'s war in the Low Coun ties (where the Greys first proved their mettle on the battlefield), in accordance with a fashion of the lime of mounting special bo...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FIGHTING FOR W[?]VES. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

FIGHTING FOR W,VES. """ + — Courtship as a preliminary to mar riage is dispensed with among the blacks along the Gulf of Carpentaria, Queensland, and love is an element ;hat does not enter much into the contract. Mr. H. Matthews, superin tendent of the Mitchell River Sta .ion, controlled by the Australian Hoard of Missions, describes one of the marriage "ceremonies" that he had witnessed recently, and the story ;p best told in his own words. "Just before I left," he paid, 'some of the bush blacks intimated their intention of fighting for the possession of some of the girls on Mir station, who we had hoped would niarrv some of our "boys." When •' heard of this I was naturally con joined, and called the bovs and girls ogethcr to discuss the matter, and :ee what. ' means could be taken to woid the conflict. Somewhat to my surprise they would not hear of that course. The bovs said that this pro cedure was quite correct, and the girls said the same. So that there was nothing for it but a...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIAN EUCALYPTUS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

AUSTRALIAN EUCALYPTUS. | The Australian eucalyptus, or, as lit is commonly called, the gum tree, I has a world-wide reputation. It has been prown successfully in many ■ countries, and in New Zealand it has been found that its growth is, in fa vourable spots faster than in Austra lia. In Brazil, in which country the eucalyptus was first introduced a •juarter of a century ago, the autho rities have come to recognise its in trinsic value for timber. Some ten years ago the /systematic culture of the tree was begun, and recently Senhor Andrade, Chief of the Forest Service in Brazil, came to Australia to secure further varieties and to consult with Mr. Maiden, Director of the Sydney, Botanic Gardens, who is regarded as the chief authority on "tucalypti. The Government of Brazil desires to cultivate the tree for the sake of the timber, which is eminently suit 1 able for railway sleepers and also I for fuel for railway locomotives.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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