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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Deep Sea Romances. MYSTERIES ONLY NEPTUNE CAN SOLVE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

Deep Sea Romances. MYSTERIES ONLY NEPTUNE CAN SOLVE. The most mysterious salvage story on record was published in the London papers of January 13th, 1894. It was as follows:—"Advices have been received of the arrival at Galveston, Texas, of the Norwegian barque Elsa Anderson, having in tow the hull of an English-built brig, which had, apparently, been burned at sea more than 50 years ago, and which appeared on the surface of the ocean after a submarine disturbance off the Faroe Islands. The hull of THE STRANGE DERELICT was covered with sea shells, but the hold and under-decks contained very little water. In the captain's berth were found several iron-bound chests, the contents of which had been reduced to pulp, except a leather bag, which required an axe to open it. In it were guineas bearing the date 1809, and worth over a thousand pounds. There were also several watches, and a stomacher of pearls, blackened and rendered useless by the action of the water. Three skeletons were also...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
YOUNG WORLD RULERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

YOUNG WORLD RULERS.   By the ordering of that Providence which     shapes alike the destinies of men and nations,     the three leading Powers of the world to-day—     the United States, the British Empire, and     Germany—are under the supreme executive     guidance of comparatively young men. These     three, the President of the United States, the     Emperor of Germany, and King Edward, to- gether wield a tremendous power, and should         they choose to act together in any given line of     policy not all the rest of the world united could     withstand their will. Together ("Leslie's Week-     ly" points out) they rule over     NE...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FIRST CHRISTMAS CARD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE FIRST CHRISTMAS CARD.     There was never a Christmas card passed   through the English post until 56 years ago,   and the man who designed the first one is still   alive. He is the well-known retired academi-   cian, Mr. J. C. Horsley. The curious thing is   that this original card was not intended for a   Christmas card at all, but merely for a birth-   day card. The late Sir Henry Cole gave the   artist the idea of the now famous card, and   afterwards had it reproduced. It was Messrs.   Tuck who published it, and sent it out as a Christmas card.   It was a quaint, old-fashioned picture. In the   centre is a family group, old and young. On   one side, some of its members are feeding a   number of starved-looking figures; and on the   other, they are clothing ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
YET INAUDIBLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

YET INAUDIBLE. A stone thrown into water produces ripples; in the same way, if you strike something—as a drum—there are ripples in the air, and the dis- turbed atmosphere reaches the ear as a sound. The slower the ripples or vibrations, the deeper the sound. The deepest audible sound in a musical instru- ment is that of the great 32ft. pipe of the organ of St. Paul's Cathedral, which gives 16 vibrations a second; that is probably the deepest sound that the human ear can catch. You listen to it, rolling through the sacred edifice like distant thunder, and a little thought will enable you to realise that there may be sounds inaudible to you, but which you can feel. The deep tone pervades your entire being until you have some doubt whether you really hear or feel it. The thunder of the cataract of Niagara pro- duces a note with exactly half the number of vibrations of the big organ pipe; that is, eight. You cannot hear the note, but it can be re- corded by delicate instruments, and you...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN BRUTALITY. HORRIBLE CRIMES IN THE CAMEROONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

GERMAN BRUTALITY. HORRIBLE CRIMES IN THE CAMEROON'S. Further atrocious acts of cruelty are reported from the Cameroons, says the Berlin correspon- dent of the "Chronicle." Herr Wittenberg, a merchant from Hamburg, has been sentenced to five years' penal servitude for impaling negroes with his ramrod. The particulars it is impossible to reproduce. Another monster named Keltinich, from Co- logne, was in the habit of pouring petroleum over the hands of negroes and setting fire to it. This fiend in human shape got three years. A third person named Hasloop, from Bremen, with his whip-handle, gouged out a chieftain's eye. He was sentenced to eight months' ordinary imprison- ment. SHOCKING CRUELTY. In his speech from the Throne in 1888 the Kaiser stated it was one of the tasks of the German Empire to open up the Dark Continent to Chris- tianity. Startling acts of gross cruelty, which have shocked the world, have been committed by German officials since that time, acts which can only have r...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"A FIRST-CLASS BRITISH LOAFER." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

"A FIRST-CLASS BRITISH LOAFER." A Hindu baker's assistant in Bombay, on setting up in business for himself, bethought him of catering for the English community as well as for the native one. With this end in view, accordingly, he had the following notifi- cation painted over his doorway:—"Ram Bux solicits respectful patronage. He is a first-class British loafer."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
X-RAYS FOR GROWING HAIR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

X-RAYS FOR GROWING HAIR.   Dr. Alfred T. Schofield does not believe in the value of X-rays in removing superfluous hair. He had a patient treated with great skill and care, with the result that a few weeks after the last application every hair disappeared (perhaps 1500 or more). In another month, however, the growth had all reappeared, undoubtedly thicker and stronger. The patient had a few more applica- tions without definite result, and since then the growth is certainly worse. The skin is thickened and hardened, and the hairs are stronger and ap- pear more numerous. He furthermore mentions an assistant at one of our hospitals, whose hands are scarred with over-exposure to the rays, but who has nevertheless a thick growth of hair on them.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TOWED BY A SHARK. AN EXCITING ADVENTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

TOWED BY A SHARK. AN EXCITING ADVENTURE. The warm waters of the Mexican Gulf are the home of many species of sharks, and in these re- gions shark-fishing is a favorite pastime. One who recently took part in this sport recounts his experiences as follows—Once having anchor- ed and thrown overboard a large iron hook, fastened to a stout rope, and baited with a lump of fat pork, we had not long to wait before the familiar triangular fin emerged suddenly from the water, and then disappeared in the direction   of the bait. A second later there was a sharp   jerk on the rope, and it began to pay out with extraordinary rapidity. When the end, which had been made fast to one of the thwarts, had been reached, the boat was almost pulled under,   but suddenly the rope slackened, and the shark, being evidently exhausted, allowed us to pull   him in until we could see him quite plainly.   Not knowing the best way of killing the hug...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DRESS LEAGUE FOR MEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

DRESS LEAGUE FOR MEN. A well-known young peer is forming a league   for the abolition of the present form of men's   evening dress. As the main object of the league is to differentiate the gentleman from his gentle-   man some startling alterations will be suggested.   Knee breeches and a colored waistcoat might   make a sufficiently distinguishing mark.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LESSON IN SELF-DEFENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A LESSON IN SELF-DEFENCE.   A prize-fighter as an author—this is certainly     a new and a bold departure, and it has been     made by Mr. "Bob" Fitzsimmons, who has for-     saken the prize ring to   become the champion   middle and heavy-   weight writer of the   world.   He has just produced   a book on "Physical   Culture and Self-de-   fence."   In his address to   women the author in-   dulges in some caustic   philosophy, which will   be recognised as both   just and trenchant.     "Muscle-building," he   says, "brings beauty to   woman. This brief statement is sufficient, I   think, to make many women embark upon a   physical deve...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SEA-SICK CURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE SEA-SICK CURE. As the steamer pitched and rolled in the waves, the traveller heard, through the thin partition, a wailing voice in the next state-room exclaim: "Oh, mamma, it's coming on again, worse than ever!" Then he heard a sleepy voice in reply: "Marie, why don't you follow the directions you told me about before we came on board?" "Because I've forgotten whether I ought to breathe in as the vessel rises, and let the breath go out as it moves downwards, or whether it ought to be the other way—and, oh! oh! oh! I wish I was dead."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MUD FOR THE COMPLEXION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

  MUD FOR THE COMPLEXION.     For certain diseases the mud bath is an old   form of treatment, but a new application is being   made of it by the woman of fashion. It is   claimed, says the "Family Doctor," that there is   nothing equal to mud for the complexion. The   face and neck are covered with a coating of clean   black river mud, which is permitted to dry on.   Care must be taken not to get it into the eyes,   and not to leave any spot of the skin uncovered,   as it will result in a red blotch. When the coat   is removed, it is claimed that the skin will be   beautifully soft, all blemishes will be removed,   including hair and moles, and wrinkles will dis-   appear.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BIG JUMP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A BIG JUMP. In Norway "ski-ing" is the national winter pastime. When the "ski" are off the feet they seem too unwieldly to be of service, for when they stand upright a man can hardly reach the   top with his hand. But clever devotees of "ski- ing" can perform marvellous feats by the side of which figure-skating appears quite trivial and ordinary. The Norwegian who can "ski" well is as noted among his fellows as the footballer, or cricketer, who in this country plays for his State. At the great "ski-ing" sports held from time to time it is quite a common thing for the winner for the year to be hailed with great en- thusiasm. First of all a run is made down a steep incline on to a platform from which the big jump is made down the hillside. Then the 'ski-er,' on taking his jump, has to alight on his feet, in order to finish the other portion of the race, and if he falls he knows his chance of victory is hopeless.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BOON FOR LADIES. NEW STYLE OF MIRROR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A BOON FOR LADIES. NEW STYLE OF MIRROR. The object of the invention here illustrated is to increase the utility of a lady's dressing-table by the addition of a secondary mirror, which is so carried that a second image or reflection is obtained, thus enabling a lady to secure a full view of the back of her head and yet leave both hands free to deal with the hair. This additional glass is suspended by two hinged arms from the supports of the main mir- ror, provision being made for extending these arms and holding them ver- tically when the glasses are in use. Where only the single glass is pro- vided frequent resort must be had to a handglass, and thus both hands are rarely at liberty at the same time. The re- sult is that much straining of the eyes occurs, and the task is rarely performed to the lady's satis- faction. While this new mirror is handy in use it is also conveniently disposed of when not needed for the toilet, resting either flat against   the large glass, or...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BUSINESS ELOCUTION LESSONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

BUSINESS ELOCUTION LESSONS.   The new Indianapolis Telephone Company has arranged to give its long-distance operators les- sons in elocution at the expense of the company, in order to improve their enunciation. The com- pany officials say that its long-distance patronage demands this in order to make the service better.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GIRL OVERPOWERS A BULL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

GIRL OVERPOWERS A BULL. A remarkable act of personal bravery on the part of a young girl of 17 is reported from Con- cidy (France). A young bull, on being led out of his stable, attacked his owner, and gored him repeatedly. Mile. Jadiq, the daughter of a farm laborer, came forward, seized the bull by the horns, and forcibly dragged him to his stable. The owner was fatally injured.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOMAN, LOVELY WOMAN. The latest variation on the theme of "Woman, Lovely Woman," appeared in an American daily recently:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

WOMAN, LOVELY WOMAN. The latest variation on the theme of "Woman, Lovely Woman," appeared in an American daily recently:— Consider lovely woman how she keepeth up to date, How she striveth to be faithful to the changing fashion plate. How she yearneth for improvement in her mental attributes, How she writeth on the Ethics of the Whizzing   Shoot-the-Chutes. How she talketh at the sessions of her half a dozen clubs. How she planneth for the helping of the maid who cooks and scrubs, How she painteth purple cupids on the useless china plaque. How she fretteth that her garments are not pleated at the back, How she purifieth matters when election cometh round, How she seeketh ever earnestly for mental sand to pound, How she goeth up and down the land in search of things to right, How she vieweth the show window with a mur- mer of delight, How she goeth bargain-hunting at the hour of 8 a.m., How she garnereth some samples and returneth home with them, How she blocketh up the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SEA MYSTERY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A SEA MYSTERY. The belief is expressed in some quarters that the British ship Nelson, which was reported to have capsized during a storm, is still afloat. One evening recently she was sighted disabled, and was picked up by tugs, one of which, the Tataosch, started for the north with the Nelson, when a heavy gale sprang up, and during the night, when the storm was at its height, the steel cable parted and the light of the Nelson suddenly disappeared, leading to the belief that she had capsized.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RIGHT WAY TO IRON SHIRTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

RIGHT WAY TO IRON SHIRTS.   For ironing, fold the shirt straight down the     middle of the back and iron the body smooth,     taking care to move the iron mainly straight     with the warp. Next fold a sleeve flat along the     sloped seam and iron it upon both sides. Iron     first through the middle, then take hold of the     wristband or shoulder with the left hand and hold     taut till the iron goes quite to the join. Open the     wristband, lay it flat, and iron hard upon the     wrong side, then turn upon the right side. Then     comes the tug of war—otherwise ironing the     bosom.     First fasten the neckband properly, next slip   &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Russian Troops in China. JEMADAR ALI'S CONTEMPT. "LET US FIGHT RUSSIA TO-MORROW." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

JEMADAR ALI'S CONTEMPT. "LET US FIGHT RUSSIA TO-MORROW." Russian Troops in China. Jemadar Ali Mukdum Baksh was on his way to visit the Rissaldar Major. As Jemadar Ali sauntered down the bazaar to the cavalry lines no one would have taken him for a Delhi Mahom- medan. He affected all the swagger of the Yagistan Pathan, and brushed his black beard and moustache back so fiercely that if it had   not been for the top of his scarlet kulah peeping out from the white muslin folds of his lungi (turban), a casual observer might have taken him for a Sikh. The good-looking Jemadar was well known in the bazaar, for in spite of origin Jemadar Ali was a power in his regiment. Many were the salutations thrown to him as he flaunted his white muslin undress and gaily flowered waistcoat down the main street. He returned the salute of such as salaamed to him with cheery bonhomie as he smiled and chaffed with such of the dwellers in the house-tops with whom he had acquaintance, and the buu...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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