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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HEALTH IN THE HOME SORE THROAT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

HEALTH IN TIIE lioilK SOUli TIIKOAT. Simple remedies appear , elTcctual. Salt and «airr js U^,'|U'51 many as a wattle, lnu hul^V" and honey dissolved in better. An implication u| clntl,s ''' h out in hot water ami aimlie.i """'K I « • 1 I le neck, chanKinjr ;is often tiu tfiti "> cool,.has K'eat potency'1,!, '' moving inllammation. h sluilltlj 'l'" kept up for a number of houlv, j/ inn the evening' is the usually',1!" convenient time for applying ihj "5l medy. rr"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COLOURS OF THE RAINBOW. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

COLOURS OF THE RAINBOW. Violet, indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange, red are the colours of the rain bow; most are sure of that. It is true, however, of on!v a very few rainbows. !Hie colours of rainbows vary with their width, and their width varies with the size of the raindrops, biff drops pro ducing narrow bows with bright clear ly-defined colours, small drops produc ing wide bows with pale colours. Here are the colours as generally seen—(1) When the raindrops average one milli metre in diameter, violet, light blue, bluish-green, green, yellow, orange, light red, dark red; (2) when the drops average three-tenths of a millimetre, in diameter, violet, ligh" blue, bluish green, green, yellow, orange; (3) when the drops average onc-tonth of a milli metre, very pale violet, violet, whitish blue, whitish-green.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GAS IN THE CAVITIES OF TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

C,AS IN THE CAVITIES OF TREES. Professor J. A. Ferguson, of the Pennysyivania State College, reports a curious phenomenon connected with j the cutting of hardwood trees in the I Ozark Mountains. Cavities near the base of the trees are often found to contain gas. When these cavities are cut into by the oak tie cutters of the region the gas escapes with a whistling sound, showing it to be under pressure and if lighted it will burn with a faint yellow flame. The sides of the cavities containing gas arc- in .ill cases dark } ened, and look as ;hough seared with ( a hot iron. The popular belief of the district is that these trees are connect ed through their roots with a subter ranean supply of natural gas, and the land on which they grow is valued ac cordingly. An examination of the gas collected from a cottonwood tree was made by Professor Bushong, of the University of Kansas, and it was found to be substantially the same as natural gas, with the addition of some free I hydrogen. Profe...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE SPEED OF THE WIND. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

THE SPEED OF THE WIND. Up to the present the greatest speed of tho wind has never been measured, for the simple reason that no instru ment has yot been invented capable of doing so. In 1878 an anemometer on Mount Washington registered 186 miles~an hour, which is tlve highest velocity on record; and last November a Robinson anemometer was blown away, in Jamaica, when registering 120 miles per hour. A tornado, however, blows far haTder than that. At various times attempts havo beon mado to estimate tho velocity of wind in a tornado by observing its effects. For instance, in 187/3 a board of pine-wood was blown against, and right through a telegraph-pole; whilst during tho same storm another plank was driven three inches into tho trunk of a tree. It was calculated that such effects could only havo been produced' by a forco little loss than that of a cannon ball—that is to say, tho wind must havo been travelling at tho rate of between, six and eight hundred miles an hour I .

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO KEEP GLASS WIND SCREENS CLEAN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

TO IvKEI* GLASS WIND SCREENB CLEAN. On damp days the moisture gather ing on tlio wind .shield obsrurtvs tho motorist's vision, and thus increasea the danger of an accident, Jt has'been found a good plan to carry a bottle of kerosene and glycerin, mixed equally, and to rub a little of this <»ver the glass when tho rain begius to fall. This causes the moisture to spread over the glass in a very thin sheet, enabling tho driver to continue in com fort dim] greater safety.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PAYING HIM OUT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

PAYING HIM OUT. .Robinson was a "traveller." How lio managed ever to secure such a position with any firm it is impossible t-o say, since, poor man, lio was afflict ed with a. most distressing stutter. Howover, he had got a job; and one hot afternoon last month proceeded to call on a certain very crusty business man with a view to getting somo orders. Unfortunately, there was no business to bo done, the aforementioned crusty business man giving Robinson an em phatic answer in the negative. Robin son, therefore, proceeded to lock up his samplo-oase, and to take his departure. Just as ho was leaving the room, the merchant called out to him : "I say," ho remarked, "you must find that impediment in your speech: i great handicap." - - "Oh, n-no I don't," stuttered Robinson." Everyone has his p-p-pecu liarity. S'-sto-stammering is mine. What's y-yours?" ''So far as I'm awaro, I haven't got ono," replied tho other. "W-what? D-don't you s-stir your coffee with your ri-right hand?" "Yes, of ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HISTORY OF THE SAW. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

HISTORY OF THE SAW. | The earliest tool that has been traced in Egyptian history is the saw. It was found fust in the' form of a notchcd bronze knife in the third dynasty, or about five thousand years before the Christian era, and was followed in the fourth or fifth dynasties by larger tootiicd saws, which were usect by car penters ; but there are no dated speci mens until the seventh century before the Christian era, when the Assyrians used iron saws. The first knives on record were made out of flint, and were, in fact, saws with minute teeth. They probably were used for cutting »jp animals, as the teeth would break away even on soft wood. Rasps, which arc but a form of saw, were first made of sheets of bronze punched and coilcd round, but the Assyrians in the seventh century used the straight rasp made of iron similar to the modern type.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHOULD WE ALL CO SOCKLESS? [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

SHOULD WE ALL CO SOCKLESS7 t Everybody likes silk stockings best. Why? Largely because tliey are pret tiest, doubtless. But there is another reason. As most of us have noticed they are coM. The comfort of stock ings depends largely upon their mat erial. Fabrics dilfer in their readi ness with which they transmit heat and moisture. The best material for stockings is that which conducts heat and allows evaporation most rapidly. Lisle thread is far less comfortable than silk, for the reason that it is a bad conductor of heat and moisture. The less our clothes interfere with the passage of heat and moisture from the body, the more comfortable they arc. Furthermore, it is desirable for comfort's sake, that the body should be air-bathed at all times. Men used to wear long stockings: Having-,adop ted socks instead, they find them so much more comfortable, that they will never go back to the old style. The new fad of socks for women has at least the justification of comfort . All children e...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PARDONABLE MISTAKE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

PARDONABLE MISTAKE. Four young Americans recently paid their first visit- to Paris, and in a res taurant,"£ffcy called the waiter to their aid in ordering their dinner. "We don't understand French, and we don't want to know what the name of the dish is," they explained; "but let it bo something typically French— something you can't get in old "United States.*5 "Tho gentlemen leave that to me," snid the waiter. "1 will devise a col lision exqui.se." And, walking to the speaking-tubo, he shouted (in clear English, as tho visitors thought): "Cat- soup!" Before the waiter had time to turn round, the young men, who fortunately wero sitting near the door, were hurry ing down tho boulevards—aghast and palo. Not till their feet were on their native shores again did they find out that "cat soup" was the Parisian pro i nuneiation for the French "quutro soupes" (meaning four soups).

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IS YOUR DIAMOND GENUINE? [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

TS YOUR DIAMOND GENUINE? The experienced eye does aot find it difficult to decide whether a stone is genuine or not, for the facets of real diamonds are seldom so regular as those of fine imitations. With the latter the greatest care is talc-i. in grinding-, to polish and smooth the who'c stone go that there will be no irregularity in the reflection, or refraction of the light. • A necessary tool for testing' is the file, which cannot scratch a real diamond, although it quickly leaves its mark on an imitation. Better than the file is the sapphire, for the sapphire is the next hardest stone to the diamond. Any stone that a sapphire can scratch is assuredly not a diamond. If you put a small drop of wnl- r on the upper face of a brilliant, and touch it with the point of a pencil, the drop will keep its rounded form, but the stone will remain clean and dry. In the case of an imitation, the drop immediately spreads out. Plunge a diamond into water, and it will be plainly visible, and wil...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CAN YOU KEEP SECRETS? [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

CAN YOU KEEP SECRETS? Keeping u socret in one of tho most difficult things for the ordinary inuii to do. Has it ever struck you how many peopfo there are whose living depends on their power of keeping their mouths «)iii t ? There i« the hank clerk, for instance, lie knows all about the affairs of im portant people who have accounts at his bank, lie may know that a man who is believed to he enormously wealthy ha«, as u matter of fact, not so much as a ten-pound note of his own. You or I might he tempted to whisper that interesting little fact to a friend, hut the haul; clerk knows that., ho must not breathe a word about it if lie wishes to keep his position. Kvcn if lie is approached by people who seem to have a right to ask quos tions, he must not aiiMver them. He must learn- if he wishes to get on - not only to keep silent, hut to foil the most artful questioners, and avoid falling into any little trap they may lay for hittr. Then there is the lawyer. Every famous solicitor is, of ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SURPRISE FOR OFFICIALDOM. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

SURPRISE FOR OFFICIALDOM. Ho was a postmaster, and rats in his office were playing havoc with: register ed letters, bo lie wroto to his chief, and his chief wrote to his chief, and so the matter wont on, till about six months later, when ho was older and greyer, he received ofiicial permission to keep a couple of cats and provide for their cost in milk. For a month all went well, but then ho was compelled to forward to headquarters this ominous message: ''I have the honour to inform you that tho senior cat is absent without leave. What shall I do?" The rats were busy again, and it was impossible to wait another six month 3 for oflicial directions, so ho took tho.. matter into his own strong hands, and a week later wrote:— "lie absent cat. I havo promoted the junior cat, and havo taken, into Government scrvico a probationary cat on full rations." Tho high officials are still trembling at his audacity.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ANOTHER STRIKE THREATENED. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

. ANOTHER STRIKE THREATEN ED. Foromtm: "What's all the fuss about over there,.Pot?" O'Rafferty: "Why, the steam-roller dhrivor wants us to call 'im the "cliuffaur" an' 'tlie min object."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRUTHFUL FLATTERY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

TRUTHFUL FLATTERY. "I'vo just called in, my dear to toll you how much I onjoycd your party last night! And, also, to tliank you for introducing to mc that charming young man who took mo into dinner I" said Miss Languish to Mrs. Blunt. "Yos, ho's a nice young fellow, isn't ha? I thought you two seemed to bo getting on famously together I" "Oh, yos; he has sucli really do lightful manners! Why after I lind sung ho told me—in such a nico way, too—that if ho had my voico ho would be a rich man in no time—and I'm suro I10 meant it! I suppose Ire is also a singer f" Mrs. Blunt never wasted words. "No; he is not a singer, dear, but 1 have no doubt he meant what I10 said. Ho's an auctioneer."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CARDINAL'S HATS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

THE CARDINAL'S HATS. A cardinal never wears the red hat that is tho actual symbol of his 1:111k ; but he has other hats, for by the law of the Church there are provided for him no less than six different forms of headgear. In the first place there is his ordin ary, everyday hat—the black, wide brimmed affair such "as clerics wear. Secondly, there is a red hat bordered with gold, which he uses when he goes to church in his red cassock. At one time this was the cardinal's every day hat. And there is another peculiar hat— quite large, with a small crown of red silk bordered with gold. This is called the capellone, and at one time it pro tected the cardinal's head as he walk ed abroad in the sun, and an attend ant held it over him. In these days, however, it is used only upon extra ordinary occasions, such as canonisa tions. The dean of the household, to whose ^are it is entrusted, holds it suspended from his left arm. Another hat is the biretta. It has different coverings for the seaso...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MARRIAGEABLE AGE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

THE MARRIAGEAULE AGK In tho United Statos the marriage-' fiblo ago—whon marriages may bo log ally contracted without tho consont of parents—varies in different States. In most of thorn twonty-ono is the legal ago for males; for females it is twonty-ono in Connecticut, Floridir, Illinois, Ken tucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South- Dakota, Virginia, West Virginia aud Wyoming. In all the other Statos which havo laws on tho subject tho legal ago is eighteen for females, except in Maryland, where tho legal ago for females is .sixteen. In Austria'tho legal ago for man or woman is fourteen. In Germany tho man must bo at least eighteen years of ago. In Franco and Belgium tho man must* be eighteen and the woman fifteen. In Spain tho intended husband must have passed his fourteenth yoar and tho woman her twelfth. TJ»o law in Hungary, for Catholics, is that tho man must bo fourteen years old and tho woman twelve; for Protestants, tho man must ho eigliteon and the woman fift...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RANDOM READINGS. WOMEN GUIDES IN HUNGARY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

RANDOM READINGS. $ WO.MKN GIJII)I0S IN HUNGARY. In liudapest women guides and in tcrprotors wear a d iil'oreiit-trolon i"0(I ribbon for ouch lunguago which thoy speak, The£ uro to bo seen walking about, the city, waiting at railway cita tions, and driving in carriages. Somo J have two or Chreo ribbons, and others have four, five or six. Bright red rc prosont English, a holiotropo or lavon dor Gorman, a brilliant yellow French, a palo bluo Italian, and a brown Dan J ish. Dutch is shown by a Nile green, | and .so on throughout all tho <v>loura and moat nations of tlvo earth

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PAYMENT IN KIND. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

PAYMENT IN KIND.' Flo was a poor* man, but had boon obliged at last, to call in tho doctor to attend lii.s littlo girl. Her illness had turned out to be a serious ono, and the doctor had to pay many visits and leave a good deul of medi cine for his patient. Now however sho was well again, and her father stood in tho doctor's room waitine for tho bill to be made out. "When nt last the account was pre sented to him, he was almost paralysed to sec the hugo amount ho owed. "The small amount is for the medi cine, and tho largo ono is for my calls at your house," said tho doctor. Tho hard-up father took out his lean purse. "Here," ho said <uis tho money for tho medieino. My--my wife will her self return your calls!" Never call a man ignorant because ho does not know what you know ; most likoly he knows what you don't know.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) OUR STORYETTE. THE ROMANCE OF MISS LEVASSE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

(Al.L ItlUHTS UkSVpVJCD.) OUR STORYETTE. THE ROMANCE OF MISS LEVASSE. When Miss Lovassa's namo is men tioned iu any liouse in Lahore or Silma a sudden silonco falls upon the assembl ed company at once. Then a voice—. sometimes a woman's, frequently a man's is raised and calls down blessings on hor head. When I first arrived in India, shy . and awkward, Bertha Levasso took mo under her wing as ir matter of course. She cared for all the girls who camo out without a mother of their own, and they one and all adored her—black sheep or white sheep alike. During the miserable six months when Peter and 1 had a misunderstanding she stood by me and fought all my battles, and Potor told mo himself how Miss Levasso gently stormed the citadol one day and made him listen to the truth of tho whole story, and a scathing indictment of his own cruel conduct. It was tho only timo I over hoard of her being severe, but her severity had tho de sired effect, and now Peter and I are married no one is so we...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESEVED.) COMPLETE STORY. THE DOCTOR'S POOR RELATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 21 February 1914

(Alt. Hirst* ErsRittxti.) COMPLETE STORY. THE DOCTOR'S POOR RELATIONS. BY J. W. KNhKSHAW. Author of "The Fortunes of Five," **Thc Coitoa Daughter," "A Tangled Heritage," '"The New Go verness" ete. "Oh, I couldn't bit to associate a-ilh people i»' ih.1t kiixl. My .unit does a jjood deal of district visiting, and 1 tried tu interest myself in it. But I Rave i; up. The working people are rough and uncultivated. Their lives are miserable, their tasles vulvar." Dr Adams louked at the girl, and there was something in hi.; eyes a lit tle unusual- a klint of anger, a taste of sadness. They were seated in a retired corner, just off the ballroom. The soft strains of music faintly readied them. There was wealth and all it can buy around them, and Amy Neilson was in keeping with it. ThJ doctor looking- at her, agreed men tally that theie was little in common between this radiant girl in the flush of early womanhood, wealthy and beautiful, and the drab, grey lives of the working- classes—the cau...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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