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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

The Indian Advocate. 120 POPE ST. GREGORY THE GREAT O. S. B. ONE of the first Benedictine monks who ascended the Papal throne, which he illustrated by his virtues, miracles and writings, was St. Gregory I, justly surnamed the Great, who suc ceeded Pelagus II, in the year 590 A. D. The 65th in the line of Roman Pontiffs, from St. Peter, he reigned 13 years; 6 months and 10 days. He was born at Rome about 540, and, after having been proetor of his native city, he embraced the religious life in the order of St. Benedict. In his monastery on the Caelian hill, he was so austere as to live only upon the vegetables sent him by his mother, and as he was incessantly occupied, in mental as well as manual toil, he brought himself to such a state that his health was ruined for the rest of his days, that he was una ble to fast at all, and only obtained power to fast on one Easter eve by the prayers of a holy monk of Spoleto, as he tells us himself in his Dialogues. St. Gregory was first and abov...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

121 The Indian Advocate. liig-hest civil office the proetorship, at the time when the distant and weak Count of Constantinople could or would do little more to protect the Romans ag-ainst internal an archy, and external conquest at the hands of the Lom bards than give them such a head as the son of the sena tor Gordian. Even then Greg-ory was a frequent visitant at Monte Cassino and Subiaco, and he had the example of the saints of his family, three aunts, Fersillla, Gordiana and iEJmiliana, as well as of his own mother, after his father had left the world to be ordained deacon, for that retirement into the peaceful shades of the cloister on which his heart was set. When he was taken from his monastery by the Pope and made one of the deacons of the church, and afterwards, during- his seven years' residence at Constantinople as what we should call Nuncio of the Holy See, it was ag-ainst his will that he was occupied in external business, however important, and we find him complaining-...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

The Indian Advocate. 122 greatness and nobility of the character of this Pope. They acknowledge that he towers above his contemporaries and above their immediate predecessors and followers. At the time of the invasion of the Lombards, in Italy, he conclu ded an honorable treaty with the Barbarians. He made just efforts to introduce pure Christianity among- the con querors; he aided and directed Theodiunda, wife of Agi helf , the Lombard duke of Turin, in her zeal for the true faith ; labored for the abolition of slavery, and the extinction of paganism in Italy, founded many monasteries; greatly en couraged the order of St. Benedict; and caused strict dis cipline and reformation of abuses to be observed among the clergy. Before Gregory the Great was elected Pope, he was walking one day in the forum at Rome, and saw some boys standing in the market to be sold for slaves. They were very fair, with large blue eyes, and long, curl-ing-, yellow hair. He asked who they were, and was told t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

123 The Indian Advocate. kings were converted, aud all the southern parts of Eng land were restored to the church. The conversion of the Arian Goths is due also to St. Gregory. Some have accused this Pope of having, through excess of zeal, burnt the profane authors, and destroyed the monuments of pagan art; but this accusation has been triumphantly refuted. He established "the Gregorian rite," with a view to liturgical uniformity. Considerable stress is laid by some Protestants on the fact of St. Gregory having repudiated the title of Universal Bishop; but there is in his Epistles (see work V, 18. 19) abundant evidence to prove that he exercised supremacy over all bishops; and that, though he and his predecessors disclaimed the title in question, which had been frequently off ered to them, they did so merely because it sounded too ambitious, and seemed to derogate unduly from the charac ter of their spiritual brethren. The Holy See had in his time large landed properties, in Italy, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

T.he Indian Advocate. 124 h Gregory took the stranger by the hand when the guests dispersed, and led him apart, conjuring him to tell him his name. The angel replied that his name was a mystery, but bade him remember the day when a ship wrecked person had come in his cell to ask an alms, and he had given him twelve pieces of money and a silver plate on which his mother, St. Sylvia, had been accustomed to send him a daily pittance of vegetables. From that mo ment, as the angel said, the Lord had determined to make him successor to St. Peter, who had so charitably distribu ted to the poor the offerings made to him by the faithful. When Gregory asked him how he knew this, the angel said who he was and disappeared. This must have been before his elevation to the Pontificate. Another time, our Lord Himself appeared to him as one of twelve poor men whose feet he was washing. The custom according to which the Pope washes the feet of thirteen "pilgrims" on Maundy Thursday, and waits on them...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

125 This Indian Advocate. the church contains are the two additions which he made to the mass. We call these additions most touching, be cause they seem to breathe that spirit of suffering and hopelessness of all human comfort and relief which char acterizes St. Gregory physically and politically. Besides his Pastorals, already alluded to, his Morals on Job, were almost learnt by heart by such saints as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bernard, and in later days, were the favorite reading of St. Teresa. His Homilies on Ezechiel and on the Gospels are scarcely less known. And yet for a perfect study of the mind of this great Saint, as well as for a complete picture of the position and work of the Roman Pontiff in his time, we must turn to the four teen books of his Epistles, in number as many as eight hundred and forty-four. Many of these are almost for mal letters of business, and there are of course many repe titions in the series. But it would hardly be possible to exaggerate their hist...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 35 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

The Indian Advocate. 126 A provincial council of the Benedictine Houses belonging- to the French province of the Casinese Congregation of the Primitive Observance of the Order of St. Benedict, convenes at Pierre-Qui-Vire, diocese of Lens, France, July 2nd. V. Rev. Prior Leo Gariador, O. S. B., left on the Aquitaine, June 21st, to represent Sacred Heart Abbey, Oklahoma Territory. Dom Domenico Serafini, Abbot-General of the Cassi nese Congregation of the Primitive Observance, was ap pointed Archbishop of Spoleto in secret consistory of April 19th, and consecrated Sunday, May 6th, Feast of the Pat ronage of St. Joseph, by His Eminence Cardinal Serafino Vanutelli. The election of a new Abbot-General will take place in Rome probably in November. The Benedictine Abbey of St. Julian de Samos in Spain has lately made a new foundation near Ovideo. Seven Fathers have already arrived at the new priory, where they will open an educational institution. The bill introduced by Delegate D. T. Flynn...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 36 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

127 The Indian Advocate. Rev. Dom Gregory Gerer, O. S. B., left Sacred Heart Abbey for Europe in the beginning of June. He will be ordained about Christmas in Buckfast Abbey, England, and afterwards go to Rome to study painting and music, in which arts he is -already very proficient. GENERAL NEWS LOCALS. The second annual conference of the Catholic Colle ges and Universities of the United States occurred at Chi cago, 111., April 18 and 19. Thirty-five Catholic institu tions in the United States were represented by one or more delegates. Sacred Heart College, O. T., had sent its Director, The object of the Association is to facilitate the interchange of ideas and information on all college matters, and to watch over Catholic interests in higher education. One of the best papers read was that by V. Rev. Father Vincent, O. S. B., Rector of St. Bede's Col lege, Peru, 111. The Grand Benefit Sale under the auspices of Sacred Heart Mission, was held at A. B. Carroll's "New Store," Shawnee,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 37 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

The Indian Advocate. 128 The distribution of Medals and Premiums to the stu dents of Sacred Heart College, 0, T., took place June 21st. The exercises were private. On another page are given the terminal results. School will reopen the 1st Wednes day of September; being the 5th. Examinations to be held Sept. 6 and 7. Twelve children, seven girls and five boys, made their first Holy Communion in St. Benedidt's church, Shawnee, O. T. , on Sunday, May the 27th. In the afternoon the members of the congregation surprised the pastor, Rev, Father Germanus, O. S. B., by presenting him on the eve of his named ay with a beautiful chalice in token of grati tude and of the esteem in which he is held by all. The presentation took place at 3 o'clock in the school-hall, af ter appropriate songs and recitations. The good Pastor was visibly affected. The Tuesday following, May 29th, in the Opera House, Shawnee, O. T., were held the commencement exercises of St. Benedict's school, which were a credit ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 38 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

' "jv ' rr 129 The Indian Advocate. Some time ago, the House committee on Indian Af fairs directed a favorable report on the bill allowing" In dians in the Indian Territory to emigrate to Mexico, the emigration to be under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior and in bands of 300. Mexico gives the Indian an opportunity to return to their tribal relations and no madic habits and they prefer this to the restriction now imposed upon them, and also as a means of avoiding the spread of tuberculosis and other diseases which have deci mated them of late. By an order of the Secretary of the Interior, the Osage National government is abolished, excepting the offices of Principal Chief and Assistant Principal Chief. The Members of Congress who refuse aid to Indian De nominational schools the only schools, says Senator Vest, a former inspector, that have done anything to educate the Indian are evidently governed by the petty prejudices ha bitual to narrow minds. Gladstone, with that o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 39 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

Thk Indian Advocate. 130 tana, and the other religious engaged in that work would certainly appreciate any help they might receive from their fellow Catholics, and the Catholic University could well afford to wait a year or two with compfeting its en dowment fund. The Catholics of the country cannot per mit the Catholic Indian schools, which have cost the re ligious so many sacrifices and self-denials, to be perma nently closed: for, the Indians have souls to be saved like the rest of us, and deserve our sympathy and help." The religious of Sacred Heart, not less than the Ursuline Sis ters, stand greatly in need of assistance to do efficient work for their Red brethren. Representatives of the Pottawatomie Indians have ad dressed petitions to His Eminence Cardinal Gibbons and "Very Rev, Stephan, Director of the Catholic Indian Bu reau, that a Catholic Indian school may be opened at Sa cred Heart, where their children shall receive a truly christian education. Unless the Benedictine F...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 40 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

131 The Indian Advocate. SACRED HEART COLLEGE, O. T. AWARDING OF MEDALS. The Gold Medal for General Excellence in the Senior Department, donated by Rev, E. M. Griffin, Chicago, 111., was awarded to William Hall, of Shawnee, 0. T. The Silver Medal for General Excellence in the Junior Department, donated by Rev. E. M. Griffin, Chicago, 111., was awarded to Leo Rodke, of Center, Indian Territory. DISTRIBUTION OF PREMIUMS. SENIOR DEPARTMENT. Good Conduct and Application Premium, - - William Hall. ( Arthur Mohat. Next in Merit, - 1 Joseph Swirczynski. ( James Moroney. JUNIOR DEPARTMENT. Good Conduct and Application-Premium, Next in Merit, Leo Rodke. Joseph McCann. Frank Schaerfer Henry Moroney. Patrick Noel. Peter Bauska. William Fender, nMJJ J-'Jl ffR-vrtwum m

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 41 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

The Indian Advocate. .132 ) CLASS AWARDS. SENIOR CLASS- Christian Doctrine Premium, - William Luby. "Next in Merit, - William Hall. , ENGLISH reading: Premium, - . . William Lmby. Next in Merit, - William Hall, ENGLISH SPELLING. Premium, . - William Luby. Next in Merit, - William O'Keefe. ENGLISH GRAMMAR. Premium, - William Luby. ARITHMETIC. Premiums, . William Hall. .Next in Merit, .' Albert Schirch, BOOK-KEEPING. Honorable Mention, - SbT&hSdi, BIBLE HISTORY. Premium, ' xi ' - Arthur Mohat. U. S. HISTORY. Premium, - William Hall, : GROGRAPHY. Premium, - x - - - Arthur Mohat. ,' . " ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Premium, - - - - William Hall. V ' PENMANSHIP. Premium, '-'J Albert Shirch.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 42 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

133 The Indian Advocate. Eft fr w JUNIOR CLASS. CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE. Premium - William O'Keefe, Next in Merit, - - - Joseph McCanii. ARITHMETIC (Kirsi Suction.) Premium, . - - - Arthur Moh at. Second in Merit, - - William O'Keefe. ARITHMETIC (Si CONH Srci ION ) j ' I Premium, - - Joseph Swirczynski. u. s. HISTRY. Premium, ' - - Joseph Swirczynski. GEOGRAPHY. Premium, ' William O'Keefe. PREPARATORY CLASS. :. Christian Doctrine Premium, - . Peter Bauska, Next in Merit, - . Henry Moroney. BIBLE HISTORY. Premium, - - Henry JNoel. Next in Merit, ENGLISH READING. Premium in 1st Division, Premium in 2nd Division, ENGLISH SPELLING. Premium in 1st Division, Premium in 2nd Division, ARITHMETIC. Premium in 1st Division, Premium in 2nd Division, PENMANSHIP. Premium, SPECIAL CLASS. Premium, ( William Fender. Henry Moroney. ( Frank Schaeffer. William Fender. Henry Noel, William Fender. John Haster. Henry Moroney. John Lommel. Leo Rodke. Ed. Fender. &

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

f. r ? f -' f " 1 $' ftn v j!eH-' if S-- y K-" '"HfP'3W T t-" TT T'T'Vr ' THE M Vol. XII. November, igoo. SUMMARY. No. 5. A good Rule. (Poetry.) The Seminoles (continued.) Death of Father Joseph Joset. Facetirc. Pawnee Dance. The Rule ol St. Benedict. Benedictine Notes. Locals. 1 The first All Souls' Day. Purgatory in Painting. A GOOD RULE. 11 you are tempted to reveal A talc some one to you has told About another, make it pass, Before you speak, three gates of gold. Three narrow gates; first: "Is it true?" Then: "Is it needful?" In your mind' .Give truthful answer; and the next Is last and narrowest: "Is it kind?" And it to reach your lips at last It passes through these gateways three,. Then you may tell the talc, nor tear What the result of speech may be. American Homes.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

135 The Indian Advocate. THE SEMINOLES, CONTINUED. AAVrfN tv WILID OAT iVND GENERAL WORTH. AT this period of our national history we are unable to pic ture or appreciate the condition of those slave days, when all blacks of Southern States were regarded as the property of the whites. The fear, the torture, the grief suffered by the ne-, groes and half breeds, who had been a people with the Scmi noles almost one hundred years, is beyond our conception. When Indian husbands were separated from' wives selected from the exiles when children were torn from their homes and carried to slavery, the vengeance of these persecuted people was con stantly alive. Persons of disreputable character gamblers, horse thieves were employed as slave catchers and showed no mercy to the helpless victim. After the violation of the treaty at Tampa, and the capture of Osceola a'nd Wild Cat, under the sacred truce, Wild Cat became a most daring enemy to the troops, and kept his war riors inspired to the savag...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 136 h ' Jlli ti costing the .Government one hundred and fifty dollars apiece. They were speedily put upon the s'cent of Indian scouting parties, but proved utterly inefficient. The public believed the hounds were to trail Indians, but reports show their use was to capture Negro slaves. The Seminoles were a species of game to which Cuban hounds were unaccustomed, and they refused to form acquaintance with the new and strange objects. The Indians had a secret peculiarly their own ol throwing the dogs off the scent, and the experiment, to close the war thus, proved a failure, and served no other purpose than to re flect dishonor on our nation. Wild Cat, after his escape from prison, was a terrible and unrelenting foe. Occupying with light canoes the miry, shallow creeks, and matted breaks upon their border, he was unap proachable. A flag was sent him by Gcncial Worth, but well remembering another flag which had met betrayal, capture and chains, the daring hero fire...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

'fjSr 137 Thl Indian Advocate. rv-v-nn- 7 ,TTf. 'srt'v h the land I was upon. My body is made of its sand. The great spirit gave .me legs-to walk over it, eyes to see it, hands to aid myself, a head with which I think. The sun which shines warm and bright brings forth our crops, and the moon brings back spirits of our warriors, our lathers, our wives and our chil 'dren. The white man comes; he grows pale and sickly.; why can we not live in peace? They steal our horses and cattlc; cheat us and take our lands. They may shoot us, chain our hands and feet, but the red man's heart will be free. I have come to you in peace, and have taken you by the hand; I will sleep in your camp, though your soldiers stand around me thick as pine trees. I am done. When we know each other better I will say more." Through the gentleness and the humanity of the "gallant' Worth," Wild Cat at this meeting agreed to emigrate with his people. He was permitted to leave the camp for this purpose. By some contrad...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

The Indian Advocate. 138 3 V V The original idea of re-enslaving the fugitives was aban doned. General Worth and Wild Cat now became the mostar dentr friends the general consulting with the famous chieftain until every arrangement for the removal was perfected. Seeing a chief of such prominence yield to emigration, band after band gave up the fight and joined their friends at Tampa. From the time of Wild Cat's removal in .the fall of 1841, until August, 1843, small bands of Indians continued to emigrate. General Worth now advised the withdrawal of troops. A few small bands throughout the State refused to move, signed terms of peace, however, by which they were to confine them selves "to the southern portion of the Peninsula and abstain from all acts of aggression upon their white neighbors." As vessel after vessel anchored in Tampa Bay to carry these wronged and persecuted people to their distant homes, the cruelty of the undertaking was apparent to the most callous heart. With ling...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1900

wry - v, f w r-t r -v- 'v (WTfyr y 139 The Indian Advocate. DEATH OF FATHER JOSET, "' , ' ' V 1 J ' A. 1TAMOTJS INDIAN MISSIONARY. , , , FATHER JOSEPH JOSET, the famous Indian missionary, expired in Aug., at Desmet Mission, Idaho, amidst the M n sorrowing Cceur d'Alene Indians, whose spiritual guide he ' ( S ' had been for the past fifty years. Calmly, peaceably, as one in a sweet sleep, he gave up his great soul into the hands of his Maker, exhausted by long years of faithful service. . He was the last of the noble band of Jesuit missionaries of which Father DeSmet was the leader, which had come from dis tant Europe as early as 1840, and had taken up his abode among 4 ' the .Flathead and Pend d'Oreille tribes. Thence, the fathers had separated to spread the word of God among the numerous scattered, roving bands of Indians, settling among them and , founding missions at their rallyin'g places. - For the past ten years his advanced age rendered an ac- a tive missionary life impossibl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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