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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 April 1898

w PREPARE FOR SUMMER PASTURE. it teems a link' early u> talk aboul dry, scant summer pastures, and the necessity of providing extra feed for the COWS when the milk begins to fail during the hot days of next July, but if this provision is lo be made it is none too early to arrange for what is to be done. This work of providing extra forage for cows when the pastures begin to fail will depend very much on the locality and the variety and condition of the grasses there growing. It is possible thai in some portions of the country, espe cially where the pastures are comparatively new* or good grasses predominate, there will be little necessity for providing for ex tra feed for late summer or early fall, but it is probable these are the exceptions to the general rule. KecV the Milk Coining-. Farmers who make dairying- a leading in dustry are realizing mure the importance of, as far as possible, keeping up the How of milk through the season. True, this re quires time and labor in growin...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 April 1898

GROWING WOOL IN PLACE OF COTTON. in nearly every cotton producing state In the Souili farmers arc making extensive preparations to decrease the acreage of the cot ion crop. The effect of over-production lias fallen heavily on the shoulders of farm ers and cotton planters, as it has lowered the price of the staple upon which the masses depend for a livelihood. The planters now realize that the time lias unne when they must devote more attention to more profitable pursuits, and it is only natural that they are declaring their alleg iance to wool growing. It has been clearly proved that cotton cannot be raised for less than 7 cents a pound. Hence, at 5 cents and 6 cents, the price it has been bringing in the last few years, it is unprofitable. According to the Wool Record, many of the farmers have expressed their intention of not raising a stock of cotton this year. This is the sea son when the seed must go into the ground, and in some districts it is estimated that but little more tha...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 April 1898

12 The Poultry Yard. S. M. SHIPLEY, :::::: Editor. COMFORTABLE QUARTERS. It is a serious mistake to permit the poul try to shift for itself, finding roosting places whereVer night may happen to overtake them. Comfortable houses, with dry sheds adjoining for scratching purposes, of capac ity for about 20 or 30 laying hens are unques tionably the most profitable arrangement. For the growing stock small portable houses to hold 25 to 30 chicks, can be cheaply con structed, a large dry goods box making a good improvised house. The youngsters will do better if kept away from the adult fowls till moved into their winter quarters. There are many buildings about the farm, that could, with small outlay, be converted into comfortable winter quarters. As a rule, the farmer feels that his time and attention are too much taken up with the (to him) larger operations of the farm, to give thought and care to the poultry. Much too often are they housed in a miser able fashion and their quarters left ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 April 1898

HARKET REVIEW. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is sell ing at in round lots: Potatoes—This market is overstocked, glutted. One dealer said he never saw any thing like it. Native, if you can sell them at all, aw going at $7(y)ll; Burbanks, $9@11; Rose, $7(^B. Beets, per sack, 75@90c; turnips, 50c; car rots, G| a ton; celery, 35@40c per doz; lettuce, 4()c; radishes, l()c; on ions, $50(^)60 per ton; cabbage, l£c per lb for California; parsnips, per sack, 7o@ 90c; cauliflower, $1 per doz; rhubarb, 2c; Walla Walla asparagus, $1.25@1.75 per 15 --lb. box. Onions—Market is very stiff. The supply is small; price, 2sc Comb Honey— W(a lie, Nevada, 12c; strained honey, sf@6c. There are no good apples, but plenty of poor ones. There is a strong demand for choice apples. Fancy apples are bringing f 2 per box: common, 40@75c. Dried Fruit (jobbing)— Apricots, bleached, per lb., 6|@Bc; peaches, evaporated, per lb., s^@Bc; apples, bleached, per lb., 9£c; prunes, Washington, 4@sc; California...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 April 1898

14 SELLING THE LAMBS. in the last few years there has been a de cided change in the public taste, in that they prefer to eal Lamb instead of mutton. The result of this change is the marketing of mil lions of lambs which under former conditions would have been kepi to increase the supply of wool and the sheep stock of the country. This change of taste, with all its effects on the business of I lie shepherd, is not peculiar lo this country. A Scottish paper notices the wonderful change in (he same direction that has taken place there since 1888. Prior lo dial time it was unusual to sell the Scot tish black face sheep under less than three or four rears old. An entire revolution has taken place in the business. The demand for the young mutton is steadily growing until it lops the market. This last rear there 1 have been more black face wether lambs fed than in any former season, and with great profit. In many cases black face lambs have, to use the Scottish phrase, turned themselves ov...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 April 1898

Homes Wanted in the new west by eastern people. If you have property m country or town for sale, list it with me, as I am in a position to corn-spend with peo ple who have money to Invest. M. Li. Matterson, North Yakln.a, Wn. FINE STOCK FOR" sale. One Imported Clydesdale stallion, one 3-Hh's blood Clyde Stallion, one 3-year-old and one 2 year-old Short-horn bull. Also a few Berkshire pigs at bed-rock prices. WM. A. CONANT, Ellensburg, Wash. Aggers & Parker Produce and Commission. Cash paid for POULTRY and EGGS, also all Produce shipped to our Alaska Branch. All consignments receive prompt attention. 911 Western Avenue • Seattle, Wash. Your boxes will never burst if put together with Cement coated Wire nails For which the Seattle Hardware Com pany has the State Agency. If your deal er doesn't keep them write to them for prices. B KEEPERS! SEND FOB sample copy of GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTURE. A Handsomely Illustrated Don QlinnliOC Magazine & Catalogue of DCCOU|J|JIICO Valuable boo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 April 1898

If) Two Great Machines. CLARK'S RIGHT LAP PLOW CALIFORNIA CUTAWAY and Seeder Combined. Orchard Plow "li.- . —- ; . . ._," ' ;f'" *' 'HflllElf " Jr^' Fr~t THIS IS THE WONDERFUL RIGHT LAP. 1^ —, c 1 ..... gr , Read .What others say about it: Si^3s|jj-*~ '■ ■ Plows close to the tree without driving horses in branches. Arlington, Oregon. down and turns'th "ground over equal to r%~.^A 4-VmZ<~, „ .-, Roseburg. Oregon, Feb. 2, 1898. Shurte Bros: In regard to the "Right Lap" any plow that I ever used. I can do twice Read til IS sSSr" cSSi»a?oSSSI' Plo^ iSSfSSt I bought of you last spring would say that the work with it that I can with a plow it ln my orchard and find that it Is exact it has exceeded my expectations in the way and find that the ground I put In with it Ko^a™ of^e^sed^ Ha^ve it does the work. It not only plows the equaled at least one-third more than that too^ hav«eyeowned^ or *en Ttool to do ground but leaves it in better shape for put in In the ordinary method. Money 1 £V...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

fAHCH And Range v|[V^ -iff" ISSUED EVERY WEEK Ik- Vol 4, No. 5. I Largest Assortment in the Pacific Northwest of 3 j AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS I » Embracing the Most Popular Approved Lines. 4 I EVERYTHING THAT A FARHER NEEDS. | I What do You Think of This: 1 E "Baby" De Laval Hand Separators, Capacities Increased ' .JESSF* HB IfliprOVC YOUf D^iflCS. |^" Designs Improved. Make them Cheaper flrT>L_ „ • W*A \\ FARM BUTTER UNSALABLE.— That this is a positive H^ ... Than Before ... M —-^SJr^EMuiuirit _ fact is '"" well known. Storekeepers all over the country arc ""JB ■^» . HI I K^^Ju^^H "(>w actually obliged to turn down FARM BUTTER, because fJS Hk» „ , -. „ „ ' , . .., , , ■ Mm L Bw^ 1 HL. there is no market for it. It does not, as a rule, come up to the m- Baby No. Guaranteed 675 pounds per hour . WlkJmmn WvJk ra^SHEgBBE . , . i , ,_,, . . , ' , „,' , , . , ■r^ HQHT 11 *f\^"j|^r^pßi ji^go standard of the public taste, and ere long it will hi' Impossible to -«M Baby No. 2—Guarantee...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

2 DO you contemplate the purchase of a new threshing rig this year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on * this coast? If so write us for catalogue. Mailed free on application. ClllMllCS, I .^ THRFSHFIK "^^^ y * GBjl 11IW\ W^ 111 M% *-* ' * _j-3j t j[. jq 7 1 III\LJIILII»J« I all IV Dj % T| /^^^\^^^m\^^i JIAtACKj, Saw Mills, ' horse powers. THE "RUSSELL" COMPOUND TRACTION ENGINE TAKES THE LEAD. It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner, write us for particulars. Russell & Co., Portland, Oregon. 320-324 Belmont Street, 160-166 East First Street. Purebred Jersey Cattle and Berkshire Swine .... M. HORAN, - • • Wenatchee, Wash. W. M. Darlington W. L. Darlington. W. H. Darlington Darlington Livestock Commission Co. Ship your Cattle, Sheep and Hogs to us. Fair treatment, top prices and quick returns Chicago, - .... Illinois. Elm wood Herd of A. J. C. C. Jerseys McCombination 39961, a grandson of Brown Bessie 74997, ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

RANCH AND RANGE. Vol 4, No. 5. ON THE ROUNDUP. M. F. A trip along the line of the Great North ern from Seattle to Spokane last week gave an opportunity to witness a pleasing degree of development of its adjoining agricultural districts. All through Western Washington, tribu tary to this line, are growing, thrifty farm ing settlements, where all the diversified crops are being raised. Dairying, it could be seen, is making much progress, and stock raising is also being taken up as a most lucrative branch. "Grass is King" in West ern Washington, and that is why it will be come a country of fine dairies and herds, with big barns dotting the majority of farms. Fruit growing will always be engaged in, but there must be much educational work done before it can be made the important indus try that the natural adaptability of the coun try will permit. There is a woeful lack of care of the orchards, and the ragged, un kempt condition of the trees, in many sec tions, does not bespeak well for ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

4 DOCTORS SCORE TUBERCULIN. Before a recent meeting of the Marion County (Ind.) Homeopathic Society, Dr. \V. R Clarke, Indianapolis, read a paper touch ing in general all forms of inoculation by animal virus for the prevention of disease, and in particular he scored the tuberculin test In this style, which we quote from the Indianapolis Journal: "Where shall we find words with which to characterize* the inconsistency of a health board that will condemn the use of milk from a cow, kill the cow and condemn her meat, and yet order all the healthy children in the city to receive Into their arms, by direct injection, poisonous and de cayed matter taken from sores on the udder of this same cow or one in a similar condi tion? Who can estimate the havoc even now wrought along the inoculation line by Pasteur alone, to say nothing of the host of his imitators?" Dr. Clarke closed by saying that the health boards have too much arbitrary pow er. He claimed that there was more danger to health in...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

t=i- Of Ours. -:= Of Ours. -:- WINDMILLS, PUMPS, FITTINGS AND PIPE. w™ FRANK H.SHAW AT UNION WAREHOUSE AND MACHINE CO. <*'• »8« *N- p- Track ' spokane, wash. PLEASE MENTION RANCH AND RANGE. LIGHT BRAHMAS. From Pacific Poultryman. "Now for facts about Light Brabmas—l moan such Brahmas as fulfill the standard requirement* They are the largest of all breeds of fowl. Matured males weigh from twelve to fifteen pounds; hens from nine and a half to twelve pounds. Roasted, I chal lenge their equal, whether chicken, turkey, goose or duck. At two months old they make fine broilers, but several other breeds equal them in this respect. They lay the largest eggs of any breed, weighing from one pound thirteen ounces to two pounds per dozen. Females of good strain properly kept lav from 120 to 160 eggs per year. They have a rich brown shell, and command a premium in all choice markets. In Boston, Brahma eggs have a separate quotation, while all other breeds are lumped together. Their combs set ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

(5 A LESSON IN BREEDING. Breeders frequently use the terms "in breeding," "line-breeding," "thorough-breed ing," and "cross-breeding," and it is well to have a clear idea of what these terms actu ally mean. "In-breeding," as it is sometimes called, is synonymous with incestuous breeding, that is, the breeding of closely-related animals, such as sire to daughter, dam to son, brother to sister, or uncle to neice (we do not like to use these terms with reference to live stock, but, until some genius invents a set of words that can be used in discussing live stock, ex pressing the same relations in the human family, we shall be compelled to use them.) "In-breeding" was practiced by the early breeders, and was justified by necessity and was comparatively safe, because the stock with which they dealt had great vitality. This is the short and easy, but not always the safe way, to fix a type. Line Hreediiif? and Tliorouß'li Breeding:. "Line-breeding" is the mating of animals belonging to th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

HOP NEWS. Work is progressing favorably during the good weather in the Lewis county yard and tieing will commence within a week. TJie twenty-acre ltussell yard ou the J. H. Long farm, is being plowed up this week and will be planted to wheat. This was one of the very best yards in Lewis county, both for yield and quality. The work of transforming twent} r acres of the big Dobson Hop Co. yard to a short pole yard is about completed. Mr. Dobson has had eleven acres of short poles for four years past and his judgment is that he can do more effective spraying in a short than in a long pole yard. Messrs. Anderson and Ketchum, of Cla quato, have rented the Goff yard, near Adna. We have heard recently of an offer by a dealer to make a contract at 8 cents, and of another 8^ cent offer. No business was done. The Gervais, Ore., Star, says that spring work on the hopyards is progressing rapidly and, there seems no danger but the acreage will be fully as much as usual. No curtailing of yards is...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED KVKRY SATURDAY. In tlic latMMtl of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stock men of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, I'tivli, British Columbia. published by thk RANCH AND BANOK COMPANY. Editorial Ottices, .... Scuttle, Wash. BUSINESS OFFICK.S: Seattle, . . - 315-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite ¥ llyputheek bank building. SUBSCRIPTION, IN ADVANCE, - $1,00 WMB YKAR. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-310 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. The editor of the Oregon paper that ad vertises the churn that will make butter in about a minute, and nearly twice as much as there is in the milk, bit like a fish on the Sn per cent, milk composition problem. Come, come, brother, wake up, or the cows will eat you! England and her colonies may be "wid us when it comes to fighting Spain, but British (Joiumbia doesn't hesitate to place an em bargo on our fruit trees. This isn't because she loves our nation less, but she is afraid that dangerous in...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

BUZZINdS. By Mrs. Chai. Lee. California's bee-keepers are feeling rather blue over the honey outlook for the coming season. To see bits of cappings and refuse from the bottom of the hive, on the alighting board, in early spring, is considered a good sign. The Southland Queen, for March, can just ly be called a convention number. It con tains full reports from three conventions from its own state, Texas. A superstition in Oldenburg, Germany, is that no swarm will leave throughout the fol lowing season, and that all swarms will set tle low, if bees are fed before sunrise on Holy Thursday.—American Bee Journal. Honey for Sore Eyes.—Thoroughly dis solve in a teaspoonful of warm water a few drops of extracted honey. Four or five times a day drop three or four drops of this in the eye. A few will effect a cure.—American Bee Journal. An observing bee-keeper will find that the business thrift of his colonies is very marked. Some colonies get right down to business the first thing in the spr...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

10 BIRDS AND INSECTS. Jn the air, swallows and swifts are cours ing rapidly to and fro, ever in pursuit of the insects which constitute their sole food. When they retire, the nighthawks and whip poor-wills will take up the chase, catching moths and other nocturnal insects which would escape day-flying birds. The flycatch ers lie in wait, darting from ambush at pass ing prey, and with a suggestive click of the bill returning to their post. The warblers, light, active creatures, flutter about the ter minal foliage, and with almost the skill of a humming bird pick insects from leaf or blos som. According to Fruit, the vireos patiently explore the under sides of leaves and odd nooks and corners to see that no skulker es capes. The wood-peckers, nuthatches, and --creepers attend to the tree trunks and limbs, examining carefully each inch of bark for inserts' eggs and laravae, or excavating for the ants and borers they hear at work within. On the ground the hunt is continued by the thrush...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

THE MOUNTAIN AND THE SQUIRREL The mountain and the squirrel Had a quarrel, And the former called the latter "Little prig." Bun replied, "You are doubtless very big, But all .«orts of things and weather Must be taken in together To make up a year, And a sphere. And I think it no disgrace To occupy my place— If I'm not so large as you, You are not so small as I, And not half so spry; I'll not deny you make A very pretty squirrel-track. Talents differ; all is well and wisely put; If 1 cannot carry forests on my back, Neither can you crack a nut!" —R. W. Emerson. VARIOUS INTERESTING ITEMS. C. H. Gruner, a merchant at Forest, Lewis county, Or., who has conducted experiments in chicory culture upon a considerable scale, will discontinue raising the product this season, because the coast market is not large enough for operating extensively. Mr. Gruner has recently disposed of five tons of his last year's crop. Rape is rapidly gaining favor as a sheep feed. It promises to make sheep breedin...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

12 The Poultry Yard. S. M. SHIPLEY, :::::: Editor. WHITE LEGHORN EGO RECORD. Mr. A. E. Curtis, of the Pacific .Mutual Life Insurance Co., of Seattle, gives the fol lowing as his experience with White Leg horns during the winters of 1892 and 1893: 28 hens from December Ist, 1892, to June Ist, 1893, laid f 02.50 worth of eggs. Cost of feed during same period, $12. Profit on 28 hens in six months, $50.50, or |1.44 per hen. An annual profit of $2.88 per hen if the record could have been kept up at sanu rate for a whole year would have been a remarkable showing. The period included the winter during which it is supposed the leghorns do not lay, but the care and treatment accorded them explains this. These birds were confined in a yard 30x25 feet and housed in a tight, warm house 25x13 feet, giving them plenty of dry, warm scratching shed accommodations. Morning feed was hot mash of mixed ground grain. Noon, vegetables, scraps and mixed feed of different things as could be conveniently pr...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 30 April 1898

SAVING BARKED TREES. If a tree, say two inches in diameter, is Larked by mice all around clear into the solid wood for a space of a couple of inches, there are two ways of treating it—either of which will succeed if properly done. One la to wait until the sap is up and the bark will slip; then, cut into the sound bark above and below, scrape the dead bark off the bare part; select a piece of bark from a spare limb just the diameter of your tree. Cut ii the proper length, and wrap it around the tree on the bare spot. Be sure to make a nice fit. Then tie around to keep in place. Cement with grafting wax above and be low, as also at the seam where the bark meets on the side. Then bank earth up around it, and the chances are the tree will go ahead all right. But it must be done quickly, and do not allow the bandage of bark to be exposed to the air any length of time. This is intended for mice work, which is always near the ground. AnotUer Method. Far higher work there is another plan Wh...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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