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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

August 1992 Aug. 10-13: Southern Region 4-H Horse Championships, Jackson, Miss. Contact Larry Lawrence, 703-231-9162. Aug. 10: Nelson County orchard meeting, Fitzgerald Orchard. Contact David Fiske, 804-263-4035. Aug. 11: Virginia Tech orchard meeting, Old Horticulture Farm, Rt. 460, Blacksburg. Contact David Marini, 703-231-5365. Aug. 12: Rappahannock County orchard meeting, Graves Mountain Farm, Syria. Contact Tommy Williams, 703-675-3619. Aug. 12: Virginia Peach Festival, Stuart. Contact Patrick County Chamber of Commerce, 703-694-6012. Aug. 12-16: Gloucester County Fair, Page Middle School. 804-693-2729. Aug. 13: Virginia Agricultural Expo, Johnny Davis Farm, Port Royal. Sponsored by Virginia Corn Growers and Virginia Soybean Association. Contact Dr. Harlan White, 703-231-9802. Aug. 14-26: Prince William County Fair, Northern Virginia's largest agricultural exposition, Manassas. Contact 703-368-0173-Aug. 15-16: Farm Machinery Safety and Extrication Program, Hanover County. Spons...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

Summer tomatoes are as good for you as they taste About 150 years ago a New Jersey farmer stood on the Salem County Courthouse lawn and ate a red-ripe tomato publicly to prove he would neither sicken nor die. For centuries tomatoes were thought to be poisonous. This is difficult to imagine as popular as they are today. NIpwWAIIHP^ livW vvUIII IwoO —j=— for jm. a Farm Bureau I Jeanine M. Sherry, M.S..R.D. | President, NewWelness Inc. hard to beat one fresh from a summer garden. Those tough, mealy-textured pink excuses for a tomato we suffered through the winter with have been replaced with juicy, succulent fire-red beauties worthy of becoming the entree themselves. It's a rare stroke of luck that something that tastes this good is also good for you. A whole medium-size tomato has only 25 calories, 10 milligrams of sodium, no fat, and 30 milligrams of vitamin C —half the amount an adult needs for an entire day. So, there is absolutely no reason not to indulge or over-indulge yourself ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

August 1992 VDACS offers new services Hi is poficy, planning and agricultural development head The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has created a new office to focus on agricultural development, advising small farmers and agribusinesses in the areas of permitting and regulatory assistance. Other services will include agriculture industry recruitment expansion and retention. Herbert H. Hill Jr. has been selected to head the new office, known as policy, planning, and agricultural development. Hill most recently was director of strategic planning for VDACS and has worked with numerous state boards, authorities and the development of the Governor's Strategic Plan for Rural Virginia. He has held positions with several other Virginia state agencies, including Economic Development, Taxation, Treasury and the Alcoholic Beverage Control Department. The office combines existing related functions of policy and strategic planning with several new functions. Specifically,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

6 Helen Neese sees Women's program as VFBF's right arm / \ ' H ■ • fgL ** *. v } \ V4||p£ , Hi '„* •, ■hH ■ MflHnJk? iiHj Ly M &'W:'*\ mHP Ak Bmmmwhh !z * v " r ***fSB Helen Neese finds growing and serving her own vegetables and fruits pleasing. By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Edtor NEW MARKET—When Helen Breeden Neese was growing up in rural Prince William County near a railroad station, she loved to catch a ride with her uncle, an engineer who would let her blow the train's whistle. In the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Mrs. Neese finds the same excitement. It's the right track to be on, if you ask her. Around every bend is a new challenge for her and about 500 members of Farm Bureau Women's Committees around the state. Mrs. Neese, a Shenandoah County farmer's wife, has been state chairman of the Women's Committee since 1983- As head of this group, she is the only woman of the VFBF Board of Directors. "My goal as state chairman has been to change the image of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

August 1992 Scientist learns the needs of form chemical users By KATHY B. SPRMGSTO Farm Dutobu News Editor McKENNEY—Mice eating the paper labels off stored chemical containers may not be the most important thing a scientist learned on her first stay on a farm, but it's an example of how chemical companies can serve their customers better by knowing their needs. Dr. Paula Miller, a synthetic chemist with Monsanto Agricultural Group of St. Louis, 111., said she would carry back Dinwiddie Farm Bureau President Alvin Blaha's suggestion to stamp the chemicals' names in raised letters on jugs so the contents can be identified if labels comes off. "My specialty may be chemistry; but if / can't talk to the biologist and the plant pathologist, the product development people, the president of the company and the farmer who uses the stuff, then I'm not going to be as useful as Ipossibly could be." She also carried back a knowledge of what chemicals Southside Virginia farmers use on what crops,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

8 Healthcare Coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums Just compare the Farm Bureau policy with other policies and you'll find that our policy is hard to beat. Does Your Policy Provide? $5,000,000 Medical Coverage? Our plan provides up to $5,000,000 in lifetime benefits for covered services. An Annual Out of Pocket Limit The Maximum you will personally pay toward covered services in any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, (for option i) Dental Coverage Included Coverage for restorative and preventative dentistry. Prescription Drug Card Just show your card at participating pharmacies for immediate coverage. Supplemental Accident Benefits Additional benefits paid for accidental injury. Low Rates A wide range of options to meet your budget needs. Entry Age Rating Your rates wouldn't go up just because you become older. 92 Service Offices To provide you personal service. Policy Form 11089...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

August 1992 Property rights decision by courts bolsters agriculture (Continued from Page 1) "This is a clear-cut victory for all Americans, including America's farmers and ranchers," said Dean Kleckner, president, of the AFBF, which filed a friend of the court brief in support of Lucas. "Agricultural producers have been as subject as anyone to restrictive regulations that impact property rights. There is a lot at stake when regulators reduce or eliminate our ability to provide food and fiber for this nation," he said. The Lucas case stemmed from regulations imposed by South Carolina that rendered worthless two lots purchased by David Lucas, who had planned to build a home on one and sell the other. Before he could do either, the state enacted the Beachfront Management Act, which left Lucas' plans, and a sizable investment, in ruin. In the ruling, the Supreme Court also asked the South Carolina Supreme Court to review whether Lucas knew about the beachfront regulations when he purcha...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

10 Organic field crops a success FREDERICKSBURG—WhiIe most American farmers don't believe oiganic production methods are applicable to largescale row crops, one Virginia grower has successfully in reduced chemical use. M.R. Fulks and his son Donald raise 10 acres of organic popcorn and 200 acres of organic soybeans on Belvedere Plantation. They also raise 100 acres of feed corn and various pick-your-own produce crops with conventional chemical methods. They market the popcorn locally through their own roadside market and throughout the East Coast and Canada. Most of the soybeans are sold to an organic food processor in Japan. Switching from standard form chemical lons of unwanted pesticides collected CHARLOTTESVILLE—Fifty-three farmers in Accomack and Nelson counties turned in 23,542 pounds of liquid and dry pesticide products in the state's second pickup and disposal of unwanted pesti- cides in June, according to a partial report to the Virginia Pesticide Control Board here July 17...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

August 1992 WANTED—Crippled or down cows, steers or buls. Rick Lewis, 804-352-5846 or 352-7352. BULLS—Angus long-tal, wi rent or sel. Grapridge Farms, Goochland, VA. 784-5145. THREE REGISTERED POLLED Hereford buls. 15 months, 1300 lbs., light birth weights. 703-886-1565. ANGUS—'fearing registered buls. EPD'S & pedigree available. Sired by R & J Spade 1204, Premier Independence, Whitehal Pulsar & P S Sasquatch 904. Reasonably priced. Cal Ken Whifock, manager, 804-633-5931; Trent Boleman, herdsman, 804-633-9823 or Holy HI Farm Corp., 804-633-7527. POLLED HEREFORD BULL, SK Skywalker X-15 son, 20 months old. 703-456-6830. REGISTERED PINZGAUER BULLS for sale. Cal Bakers Rnzgauers. 703-466-3540 or 703-669-1245. SIMMENTAL BULLS and 4 bred purebred Simmental heifers available. Tom Clark, 703-228-4407. Wythevile. FOR SALE—Registered gray Brahman, gentle. Diamond B Farm, Powhatan, VA. 804-794-1209. REGISTERED ANGUS—BuIIs & open heifers, performa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

Farm Bureau V) Vol. 51, No. 7 THE VOICE OF VRQNA'S AGRICULTURAL PROOUCERs August 1992 "Protection. No doubt about it. Our agent helps us plan just the coverage we need. And they helped me develop a financial strategy for the future. Now my retirement years can be restful years. No wonder Americans from every walk of life depend on Farm Bureau Insurance." VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY EARLY SETTLERS INSURANCE COMPANY SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU ANNUITY INSURANCE COMPANY 200 W. GRACE ST., RICHMOND, VA 23261 804-788-1234 1 Helping You Is What We Do Best nonayaucKie una reo owns » npswooo, cvcv woo, mate a restful gcane on Route 15 In Oranoa County.

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

, 'it # # # # riftn Kiivaoii i. d,i hi Jjiircciu. Vol. 51, No. 8 Conventional vs. organic Which is best for agriculture? By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Edtor RICHMOND —Market pressures will force most Virginia farmers to adopt some so-called alternative agriculture production methods in coming years, according to Dr. Sandra Batie, an agricultural economist at Virginia Tech. But farmers will use only those new techniques that save them money or meet stricter environmental regulatory standards, Dr. Batie predicted Aug. 5 at a forum on the future of Virginia's food industry held before the annual Virginia Agribusiness Council's Virginia Food Festival. Speaking to an audience of state farm dignitaries, political leaders and reporters, Dr. Batie addressed the current debate between alternative agriculture techniques, such as integrated pest management and organic farming, versus conventional agriculture techniques, like chemical pest control. It's not just a battle of conflicting technologi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

2 $613 million bond referenda will appear on Nov. 3 ballot Three general obligation bond issue questions will appear on the Virginia election ballot Nov. 3. They represent $613 million. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation has taken a neutral position on the Vote yes on the bond referenda By LAWRENCE H. FRAMME, 111 Chairman, Virginians for Progress Foundation Unless we vote "Yes" to approve the three general obligation bond referenda, the monies contained in these packages cannot be used to ensure future economic progress for all of us. One of the most fundamental functions of state government is educating our people. While the state provides significant support for education in general, very little money has been set aside in recent years for building and classrooms in our colleges, community colleges and universities. Virginia's colleges, universities and community colleges have been without a state-supported capital outlay program since 1986, while enrollment in those institutions...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

September/October 1992 mm, s BBW HH W WMi .. IMi- I | . **- j.■ | lei |$f J■> M'* ?,/1 '.$ ' ■RH * Students get a taste of the farm during the annual "Ag Search" at the 1991 State Fair of Virginia. (He photo) Livestock shows gain interest at fair Livestock exhibitors at the 1992 State Fair of Virginia, which runs Sept. 24Oct. 4, can look forward to several new classes and programs. "Thanks to the hard work of our livestock superintendents and our new show approach, there has been a renewed interest in exhibiting at the fair,'' said Clay Roberts, livestock coordinator for Atlantic Rural Exposition, parent company of the fair. Limousin cattle breeders are holding their point show for the southeast region Sept. 29. The junior beef program offers new youth exhibitors a class for developing a consumer products exhibit. People who love cashmere sweaters won't want to miss seeing the first-time cashmere goat show. With the fair's theme, "Salute Canada," it's appropriate that the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

4 Proper cattle injections are vital BLACKSBURG —How carefully farmers inject medications into cattle has become a concern throughout the U.S. cattle industry. Some commonly accepted injection techniques are causing damage to high quality beef cuts. "Improper injections are causing damage to animal hides and muscle tissue which end up hurting beef processors and the industry as a whole,'' explained Spencer K. Nealejr., assistant director of commodities for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. /'Many processors don't receive premium prices for those carcasses because of injection site damage," he explained. "When cutting meat for steaks and other consumer products, blemished tissue can't be used. And since a lot of that damage isn't visible until after slaughter, farmers don't realize they're a big part of the problem," he continued. Farmers should begin the process of selecting the appropriate injection site by consulting labeled instructions or a veterinarian. Cattle will get the f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

September/October 1992 Stale conservationist answers fanners' questions on plans Note: In this interview, State Conservationist George Norris talks with former editor Kathy B. Springston about many of the concerns Virginia farmers have about conservation compliance Questions include those the Soil Conservation Service hears out in the field. QThe Soil Conservation Service has devoted a lot of • time to helping farmers develop conservation plans tor the 1985 Farm Bill. How many plans have been developed in Virginia, and how many have been put into practice? A In Virginia, we had about one and three-tenths ■ million acres of highly erodible land that required conservation compliance plans and we've worked with farmers out there to develop about 45,000 plans on about 1.2 million acres of that land... About a third of the plans had been applied by mid-July on about a half million acres. By September, we hope to have about half the plans applied. gSince SCS began helping farmers develop ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

6 Shoppers learn of low food costs Helen Neese State Women's Chairman Farm Bureau WOMEN Our state Women's Committee joined forces with the state Young Farmers Committee this summer and successfully promoted the low cost and high quality of our nation's food supply to Virginia consumers. It was called "Putting Food First," and volunteers from the two committees gathered at six grocery stores around Virginia to illustrate the low cost of food to consumers. In each district around the state a random urban grocery shopper was chosen to receive Committees join together Tomorrow's HARVEST Carl and Maxine Arey State YF Chairmen As Helen Neese, Vfomen's Committee chairman of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, writes about in her column this month, the SAFEMARK Long Bar/Short Bar Rear Tractor BH 4 Year Field Hazard Warranty 10% REBATE • Buy a pair of long bar/short bar tractor tires. (Applies only to long bar/short bar.) • Get first tire at regular price, receive 10% discount off second ti...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

September/October 1992 Support growing for Ag in the Classroom RICHMOND—The promise of more financial support has backers of the Virginia Agriculture in the Classroom program excited, so much so that a new curriculum is being developed for sixth-graders. The current program is designed for use by fourth-grade teachers. It is designed to improve the farm literacy of elementary school children. The non-profit Virginia Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation has received more than $34,000 in donations so far this year, with a yearly goal of $ 100,000. Some of that money will be used to purchase materials for a sixth-grade curriculum being developed by Dr. John Hillison, agriculture education professor at Virginia Tech. Hillison will focus on integrating agriculture facts and exercises into four study areas: science, math, language arts and social studies. "The idea will be to use agriculture as a medium for teaching each of those areas," Hillison explained. As an example, Hillison said...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

8 Congressional candidates answer questions Candidates for the Nov. 3 U.S. House of Representatives congressional < Farm Bureau pollsters asked the following Congressmen questions abo. (Note: two of tbe 10 incumbent Congressmen aren't running for reseat has been created in Northern Virginia.) CANDIDATES QUESTION 1 QUE' I Approximately 35 mWon Americans do not have health insurance and 930,000 of With a skyrocketing federal deficit, do them are VkgMans. What are your suggestions for improving the state's health care curbing annual federal deficits to low* system? Do you support national health insurance? increases? Curbing spending? A combi *Rep. Herbert H. ' 'Herb'' Bateman, R-Ist I support legislation to allow self-employed workers to deduct the ful cost of their health insurance, I believe the best way the federal government car but I don't support a national health care system. Efforts to improve health care should include reform under control. To achieve this end I su...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

September/October 1992 about key rural, agricultural issues k elections were surveyed by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. * t some key issues affecting rural Virginians and the agriculture industry. election this year and because of redisricting, a new congressional TION 2 QUESTION 3 QUESTION 4 j have any solutions to stopping and/or Traditionally, a farm bill is enacted by Congress every five years and it's amended Do you beleve that when Congress passed Section 404 of the Clean Water Act that +» federal debt? Do you support tax anrualy. Do you befieve the current farm program promotes farm income and assures the "Waters of the United States" was referring to cropland and that it should be ...ton of both? a bountiful supply of qualty products for the consumer? If not, what program wouid? regulated by the Army Corps of Engineers, or was it referring to swamps, marshes and bogs? What changes, if any, would you propose to the Act? help the economy grow is to bring federal spending...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1992

10 Bateman (Continued from Page 9) QUESTION 3 nature and world markets; protect our natural resource base through strong sol and water conservation programs; maintain an adequate, stable and affordable source of farm products for the nation; and let market-oriented agriculture rather than government action determine production and price. Fox (Continued from Page 8) QUESTION 1 insurance system, b. Reduce unnecessary paperwork. Currently, 15 cents of every health care doter goes to administration and not to actual patient care. c. Prohibit drug companies from selling their products at higher prices domestically than they do abroad, d. Reform our medical liability system to eliminate unnecessary medical procedures, e. Guarantee a core benefits package to be provided by al insurers, f. Encourage the practice of preventive medicine. I wi be a strong advocate for a comprehensive, national solution to our health care crisis which wi provide universal, quality health insurance coverage to a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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