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Elephind.com contains 13,869 items from Pacific Appeal, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 14 February 1863

SMwrtiscmfnts. OTICE.—ALL PERSONS WHO HAD tickets for the Emancipation Celebration of the 14th ult., are requested to come forward and make returns for the same. By order of the Finance Committee. R. A. Hall, S. Cunee, N. Cook, J. P. Dyer, B. Fletcher. f!4 J. H. STILL & CO., NEW YORK BOOK STORE, IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN American and foreign books, stationery, newspapers and magazines, No. 217 Montgomery street, (Rubs House,) between Bush and Pine, San Francisco. f 14 For Sale in Pctaliiiiia. Aboot-blackin g establishment, with fixtures complete, to wit: 1 boot stand, to contain chairs ; 4 arm chairs, with cushions ; 2 cane-seat chairs ; 2 hard wood chairs ; 1 large mirror ; 2 pictures ; i new stove, with pipe complete, cost $12 ; 8 yards carpeting, matting, &c., &c.; 1 cot and mattress ; 1 lamp ; cooking utensils ; plates ; 1 camphene can ; broom ; buckets. All for the sum of $40. A cash customer will do well to apply to the undersigned, for they ...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 14 February 1863

16 GEO. W. CHAPIN k CO., GENERAL AGENCY — AND — EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO, Find employment for all kinds of Help. House Servants, Cooks, Seamstresses, Grooms, Waiters, Coachmen, Farm Hands, Day Laborers, Mechanics, etc.. With the above, we have a House Brokerage and Real Estate Agency—Rent Houses and Lands, Collect Bills, Money Loaned and Hired, &c., <fcc. Kearny St., 3d doc above Clay, lower side of I'laza. myio-tf BOARDING HOUSE. For colored people.—mrs. Turk will accommodate a few respectable colored ale with Board, with or without Lodging, or jing without board, at her residence on Sacramento street, corner of Chamberlain, nearly opposite the Catholic Church. Mrs. T. will spare no pains to surround her guests with all the comforts of a home, and with a well stocked Larder, and comfortable and neatly furnished Rooms, awaits with confidence the support of the public. Board, with Lodging, per week $7 50 Board, without Lodging, per week.... 6 00 Lodging...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

THE PACIFIC APPEAL ft. fUfeEklif. Journal, denoted ta the jfntei L eAt& af the UPeafde ofi $aLafi, VOL. I.) SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1863. [NO. 47.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Contributors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

Our Contributors. DR. EZRA R. JOHNSON, Rev. J. J. MOORE, Rev. T. M. D. WARD, J. B. SANDERSON, J. M. BELL, WM. H. YATES, E. P. DUPLEX, WM. H. FOOTE, WM. 11. HALL, WM. A. SMITH, J. M. WHITFIELD, JACOB FRANCIS, S. B. SERRINGTON, I)r. WM. H C. STEPHENSON, CHARLES M,. WILSON, A. FERGUSON. And others that will be announced from time to time, with a number of lady contributors.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

The Appeal will be devoted to tlie interests of the Colored people of California and to their Moral, Intellectual and Political advancement. AGENTS. The Rev. T. M. D. Ward, Traveling Agent. James A. Day, Stockton, Gal. Wm. Mills, James Nichols, Sacramento City. Albert D, Berghart " Isaac Sanks, Grass Valley. Ed. Duplex, Marysville. Robert Banks, Big Oak Flat. Wm. Smith, San Jose. George Miller, Petaluma. Wm. W. Rich, Oakland. Wm. Page, Sonora. A. L. Sanderson, Placervil'o. Denis Carter, Nevada. Elijah Booth, " S. P. Clanton, Benicia. E. Hatton, Napa. Isaac Morton, Coloma. William Holmes, Oroville. James 11. Hudson, Suisun City. Lewis G. Green, Los Angeles. Isaac Flood, San Antonio. Robert H. Small, Coulterville. James Moody, Jackson, Amador Co. Chas. G. Hawkins, Sutter Creek, " Francis Green, Michigan Bar. L. A. Monroe, Mariposa. John C. Mortimore, Aurora. Mono co. Wm. H. Foote, Weaverville, Trinity county. David Mcßeynolds, Shasta. Win. Prescott, Portland, Oregon. Richard W. Freema...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
s [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

s In the days of chivalry, when one knight challenged another, he did so by throwing down his gauntlet, or iron glove ; he who took it up was understood to accept the challenge, and to hold himself in readiness to engage in mortal combat with the challenger. Influence is to be measured, not by the extent of surface it covers, but by its kind.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
' 2T • Abolitionism Becoming Respectable. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

' 2T • Abolitionism Becoming Respectable. Abolitionism, as defined by sham democrats and their allies, is becoming a very respectable thing. They stigmatize as abolitionists all who do not acknowledge the righteousness of slavery, its compatibility with divine ordination, its perfect harmony with republican institutions, and its just claim upon the respect and reverence of the wisest statesmen and the soundest political economists. If a man now repeats with emphasis the doctrines of the Declaration of Independence—that all men are created free and equal, and are endowed with the inalienable right of liberty—he is an abolitionist. If he insists that human slavery is opposed to natural laws, and rests upon an outrage and usurpation, he is an abolitionist. If he contend that differences in color necessarily imply no superiority in mental power, then he is an abolitionist, and would disregard God's imprint oh his human offspring. If he contend that the white man has no more moral right ...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Problem of Bace. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

The Problem of Bace. Some of our exchanges come to us with long leaders, under the above heading. They are endeavoring to establish the fact of inequality of races, and argue thence that the weaker races are naturally and inevitably to be enslaved by the stronger. They eay that the black race is inferior to the white race, and tfiat wherever the two have coexisted, the whites, if sufficiently numerous, have held the blacks in slavery. Because this has been, they argue that it must continue to be. In their view, the President's proclamation is aimed against a sociJlMtatusjßxed and permanent by the laws of (rod. This "liignerTaw*' receives their homage. They arc its willing subjects, and evidently hope it will over-rule antislavery proclamations and acts of Congress. Bnt the equaltty of the races is not the point in question.. In this argument we do not care whether the acient Egyptians, whose armies overrun and subjugated nearly all Asia, were white or black. It is of no consequence,...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Rebel Sympathizers and Emancipation. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

Rebel Sympathizers and Emancipation. A good argument in favor of the proposed Emancipation proclamation may be drawn from the comments of the disloyal press throughout the' North. It has always been their policy to oppose, under a professson of constitutional veneration, every measure which had for its object the crushing of the rebellion. They hypocritically cry, " See what a useless war this is; the South can never be whipped." But when the Government rises with a new impulse and a greater vigor to the task before it, and measures, extreme and necessitous, are demanded and applauded by the loyal people, these men either weep for a "torn Constitution," or sarcastically talk of a " bull against the coment." So fantic have they become on the subject of emancipation, that they are at a complete loss to know whether to argue against its constitutionality or its inefficiency. Relying rather upon ridicule than argument, the majority have chosen the latter objection, and appeal most drama...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Black Soldiers of South Carolina. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

The Black Soldiers of South Carolina. Mr Frances D. Gage writes to the Independent an account of the mustering into the army of the First Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers : "The black soldiers were marshalled before the headquarters of General Saxton—a stalwart band—proudly shouldering their guns, as they stood in their red pants, blue coats and caps. Gen. Saxton, (one of God's noblemen,) whom the world will honor, came out and stood before them in military costume. Grouped around were parties of scoffing soldiers—here and there an officer, whose curled lip and and upturned nose told the whole story of his patriotism and philanthropy —while groups of negroes, of 5 all ages and bikcs, filled up the circle, watching with staring eyes for this strange ceremony Gen. Saxton is tall, with a finely moulded figure, straight as an arrow, very graceful in his motions, and exceedingly active. After showing them the first movements of the drill, and having them follow him for a few moments...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Military Tactios. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

Military Tactios. THE PACIFIC APPEAL. SAN FRANCISCO : SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1863. Sometime ago the Anglo-African, the paper published by Robt. Hamilton in New York, iuggested the idea that the colored people of the Northern States Bhoufd acquire a knowledge of military tactics. We see no reason why we should not make ourselves familiar with the knowledge of military science ; on the contrary, there are many reasons existing, in the pressing military exigencies of the times, whitah impel us to prepare to take part, if need be, in the strife for national life and freedom. Why should we not be studying military tactics and drilling here, as well as in other parts of the land ? We know that there are and have long been volunteer companies of colored men in New York, Philadelphia, and other eastern cities, and that they are considered very efficient in their drill. We have, in this State, a number of colored men who have belonged to some of those companies ; also, many are here from the...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

CORRESPONDENCE. Grass Valley, Feb. It, 1863. Mr. Anderson—Sir : I have been surprised that in no one of your last three "issues, no announcement has been made of the death of J. M. Ilerndandez, who died of small pox, in New Westminster, B. C., on the 16th day of January, aged 33 years, lie was a native of Florida. We are having exceedingly bad weather at present—rain and snow. Yours, Isaac Sanks. [The above is the first information that we have received of' the death of Mr. Hernandez.—Ed."]

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

Senator Collamer, of Vermont, made Ihe best criticism upon that part of the President's Proclamation which gives freedom to one part of a State and slavery to another. He remarked that, like Hudibras, he was willing to trust to one spur, for if one side of the horse was kept in good pace the other side would not be far behind. The attempt to maintain slavery in a district, or a small part of a State, South ern people say, will prove an utter failure, and no doubt the President expects it to be so.—The Boston Watchman and Reflector. The colony of contrabands (some 600 in all) in Washington had a very good dinner on Christmas. Mrs. Lincoln sent them 21 turkeys, while others made up the desert —a widow working in one of the departments contributing $10. The rumors that contrabands are being sent to the North are idle, so far as Washington and vicinity are concerned. The demand for male and female labor is greater than the supply in that region, and must be fur some time to come. It is ...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
9 Kr»ui the Liberator. Emancipation Meeting. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

9 Kr»ui the Liberator. Emancipation Meeting. The 1st of January, 1863, the day when the emancipation of 3,000,000 American slaves was proclaimed, was celebrated in New Bedford by a religious meeting in Liberty Hall, under the auspices of the colored clergymen. In the morning, a prayer meeting was held, and in the afternoon and evening, the time was mostly taken up in speeches, by Rev. J. Girdwood, Daniel Ilicketson, Rev. I. H. Coe, Rev. Jacob Mitchell, Rev. T. C. Moultou, Rev. Wm. Jackson, Dr. Geo. W. Stearns, Rev. Wm. W. Grimes, Rev. Wm. Jackson, and Wm. H. Johnson. The following resolutions, reported by a committee, were unanimously adopted : Resolved, That, trusting in the arm of Almighty God for the fulfillment of our hopes and expectations, as the result of the proclamation of our President, Abraham Lincoln, we look forward in faith to the time when the hand of the oppressor shall be stayed, and universal liberty shall triumph in this land. Resolved, That in the proclamation wh...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
10 From tbo S. Y. THimac. The Proclamation of Freedom. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

10 From tbo S. Y. THimac. The Proclamation of Freedom. Washington, Jan. 12. Gen. Clusseret has written to a Senator, under date of January 7, at Winchester, a letter that will give that perfect soldier a stronger claim upon the admiration of his adopted countrymen. He says : " We have received—Gen. Milroy and myself—the President's Proclamation of Freedom. In consequence, we yesterday posted on all the walls of Winchester, and scattered throughout the country from farm farm, an order from Gen. Milroy, notifying all slaves that they are free, beginning from the 1st of January, and have the right to claim wages from their masters, or to quit them, and that in this case the troops will protect their rights precisely as they will those of all other citizens." The northern neck of Virginia, the heart of aristocratic and wealthy slavery, is alive with a vast hegira of bondmen and bondwomen, traveling under President Lincoln's pass. The proclamation is depopulating the whole country betwee...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
STATISTICS OP THE FBOCLAMATION. Proportion of Slaves Freed and Left in Bondage. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

STATISTICS OP THE FBOCLAMATION. Proportion of Slaves Freed and Left in Bondage. Slaves absolutely Freed in Eight Rebel States. Alabama 435,080 Arkansas 111,115 Florida 61,745 Georgia 462,198 Mississippi 436,631 North Carolina 8X1,059 South Carolina 402,406 Texas 182,566 Total 2,422,800 Slaves Freed in Parts of States in Rebellion. Louisiana—3s parishes 245,940 Virginia—93 connties 451,533 Total 697,473 Slaves in Parts of States Excepted by the Proclamation. Louisiania—l3 parishas, including New Orleaus 85,786 Virginia—ss counties, including the 48 of Western Virginia 39,332 Total 125,118 Slaves in Border States wholly Excepted. Delaware 1,798 Kentucky 225,483 Maryland 87,189 Missouri 114.931 Tennessee 275,719 Total 705,120 Recapitulation. 1. Slaves absolutely fieed in 8 rebel States 2,422,800 2. Slaves absolutely freed in parts of 2 States 697,473 Number of slaves declared free 3,120,273 3. Slaves excepted by the Proclamation in parts of Louisiana and Virginia 125,118 4. Slaves exce...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
President Benson—A Letter from Mr. Ralston. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

President Benson—A Letter from Mr. Ralston. London, OctobeT 25tli, 1862.—President Benson left Liverpool on the 24th inst., by the monthly mail steamer for Liberia, after an absence of seven months from home. On the previous evening he was present at a grand banquet given by the Mayor of Liverpool to the Mayor and Corporation of Manchester, and made a speech. On the 22d he attended a great dinner given by all the foreign Consuls of Liverpool, where he also made an address. The fete of the Manchester Corporation was intended for the 15th, but was advanced two days for the accommodation of the Presidedt, who had to depart on the 14th. The President has. gained golden opinions wherever he has been in Great Britain and the continent, and his visit will be of great benefit to his rising young country, in making it known and extendiug commercial relations between it and the countries of Europe.— African Rqjository.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Colored People in 1770. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

The Colored People in 1770. A superb volume, entftled " An Historical Research Respecting tin Opinions of the Founders of the Republic, on Negroes as Slaves, as Citizens and as Soldiers," from the pen of Mr. Geo. Livermore, of Cambridge, appears in the very mick of time, to enlighten us upon the status of the negro when Washington, Thomas, Laurens, Alexander Hamilton and Jefferson controlled public affairs- These two hundred and fifteen pages are filled with the testimony of the fathers to the valor, the intelligence, the heroic patrtotism of the negro. They prove that in 1176, and for a long time before and after, the drift of religious and political opinion was utterly against slavery, and in the most humiliating contrast with the negrophobia of our own day, which has culminated in historical falsehood, judicially uttered by Chief Justice Taney, with a recklessness which has excited the indignation and contempt of well-informed men. He " accompanies his decision," says the histori...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
13 gtot ftdegwphw fjtat#. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 21 February 1863

13 gtot ftdegwphw fjtat#. Washington, Feb. 13th.—The report of the Committee on Territories, made by Senator Wade to-day, shows the Utah Legislature suppressed the Governor's Message, and that no freedom of suffrage is allowed or opinions tolerated in opposition to the Church dignitaries ; that polygamy is practiced to the extent of incest ; that there is no law giving redress for the abuse of marriage relations, and that the Mormons are openly inimical to the Government, though in popular phrase steadfast adherents of the Constitution of the United States. Accounts from Newfoundland state that the inhabitants are suffering very much in consequence of the intensly cold weather. The weather in New Orleans was very cold. It was generally believed there that Gen. Butler would return, if not made Secretary of War. The Attorney General has decided that the Goverment is not liable for Floyd's acceptances. liills have been prepared, and only await the opportunity to be reported, appropriat...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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