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Elephind.com contains 1,748 items from Southwest Chinese Journal, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

17 & ^ # Southwest Chinese Journal JANUARY 1981 China's Church Services: Standing Room Only How much of the work of American and other Christian missionaries survives in China today? As China, moving away from the fanaticism and turmoil of the cultural revolution, pursues its three-year-old policy of economic modernization and renewed contacts with the West, here is the testimony of one missionary-educated Chinese citizen, a retired journalist living in Peking who recently revisited his birthplace, Shanghai. SHANGHAI — Owing to the poverty of my parents' family, I was sent to a missionary school, with tuition favorably reduced, when I was 16 years old. My school was named the Middle School No. 2 of Soochow University, situated at Quin san Road, Shanghai, and owned by the Methodist Mission. Besides Chinese teachers, I and about two score of my classmates were taught by several American teachers. Mrs. A. P. Parker taught us Shakespeare, Mr. Brink ley taught us English, and Charles...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

JANUARY 1981 v?b A] 4li Southwest Chinese Journal 18 SEMINARS ON ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN EDUCATION The National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education (NAAPAE) has been refunded by the National Institute of Education to continue its project, The Asian Pacific American Research Seminars. The project is headquartered at the Asian American Studies Center at UCLA. The project continues to identify researchers and develop a network of social scientists interested in educational development of Asian and Pacific Ameri- cans. The series of national seminars on educational issues and professional development has been expanded to include: 1. The Asian American Public Policy Training Seminar, May 15-17, 1981, in Los Angeles, organized by Prof. Don Nakanishi. The seminar will provide in-depth training on the application of social science research to Asian American policy issues. 2. The Curriculum Development and Evaluation Training Seminar, date to be announced, to be held in Chica...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

19 & fa ^ ill Southwest Chinese Journal JANUARY 1981 Microwaves May Aid Fight Against Cancer Microwaves similar to those in home microwave ovens may someday be used to destroy cancer, according to Dr. K.C. Wong, chairman of the department of anes- thesiology at the University of Utah College of Medi- cine in Salt Lake City. Hospitals are already using microwaves to fight congenital heart disease in infants and to treat frost- bitten fingers and toes. Researchers are hopeful in their early experi- ments in using microwaves to combat the spread of cancer. "Cancer cells are rampant-growing cells that the body can't control," explained Dr. Wong. "Because of this, the cancer cells require more food and nutrition. In other words, the patient has a higher metabolic rate. "If one can place parts of the body which are in- flicted with cancer under microwave energy, the micro- wave heat increases the metabolic requirements of those cells. They, in effect, become hungrier than before. Now ...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

JANUARY 1931 ffe ^ #8. Southwest Chinese Journal 20 REFLECTIONS By WILLIAM DER BING The year is 1899. The place is a village in Kwangtung Province. A young lad of 14 read a letter written by his father. In the presence of his mother and his siblings, the young lad relayed the message that he was to go to America where his father was and in his hands, he clutched a money order that covered his passage and little more. We can imagine the sad- ness of the farewells for in leaving home, many will never see their families again. This youngster arrived at Angel Island and throughout the grueling stay, with INS personnel less than civil, he was fin- ally processed after several months and was put on a cattle train bound for Chicago. After an eternity in an unheated box car, he arrived and was promptly ushered into his new role, that of learning the res- taurant business. That Monday morning, his father taught him simple English phrases; who on the beat to take care of; who at the health de...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

& ffe ^ # Southwest Chinese Journal JANUARY 1981 TEA GIVES FLAVOR TO CHINESE TRADITIONS Tea was said to have b3en introduced to China by Shen Nung, a mythical ruler of China, in 2737 B.C. The habit of tea drinking was well entrenched by the Tang dynasty. According to the Tea Classics, written by a famous scholar of the period, the tea leaves were first ground into powder before they were infused in hot water, often to the accompaniment of an elaborate ceremony. The Japanese, who inherited the Chinese culture of the Tang period, still preserve the tea ceremony in its essential form. The Chinese drink tea to refresh their spirits as well as quench their thirsts. When a guest arrives at a home or restaurant, the first thing that is offered is a cup of tea. At meetings among friends or businessmen, tea is usually served. Tea-shops used to be favorite meeting places in China just as the traditional pub is in England. Even though coffee shops have sprung up in the major cities in Taiw...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

981 i ® i^ ill South west Chinese Journal JANUARY 1981 COMMUNITY NEWS calling 926-4759. not in and he wi11 As of January 1st, 1981, Mr. Bill Woo has retired from the grocery business after operating a store continuously for 32 years in the same location. During these many years he has success- fully combined business with community service. He has been actively involved in many or- ganizations in the Chinese commu- nity. Mr. Woo is past president of the Houston Lodge CACA and is now Regional Grand Executive of the CACA Mr. Woo is presently volun- teering his time and experience i gained through many years of deal- Iing with businesses and govern- ment agencies to any person in need of his services in the Chinese community. He can be reached by (Leave your name and number if he is contact you.) hi sic Huang flew to beautiful Singapore over the Christmas holidays to visit hubby C.C., who is the Manager of the Data Processing and Communications Departments of McDermott Engineering Co. ...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

23 & ife ^ Southwest Chinese Journal JANUARY 1981 LETTER TO THE EDITOR As a Chinese American, I believe that it is im- perative the Chinese community truly understands and appreciates the very real and viable political pro- cesses prescribed and protected in the United States Constitution. When any President proposes legislation or po- licy changes to the Congress of the United States, that proposal enters into a lengthy and complex pro- cess of scrutiny and study by standing committees and adhoc committees of both the House of Representa- tives and the Senate. There is debate and evaluation in all these committees before the proposal is re- ported out favorably or unfavorably. The issue is then debated before the entire membership of both Houses. In many instances, conference committees consisting of selected members of both Houses will Convene to develop language which is mutually accep- table to both Houses. Thus, new legislation or po- licy changes in our political system do...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 January 1981

Southwest Chinese Journal afr At $ ife VOL.6 NO. 1 JANUARY 1981 SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR Phone:631-9824 or 227-1203 P.O. Box 18603 Houston, TX 77023 HIGHLY ACCLAIMED EXHIBITION 'THE GREAT BRONZE AGE OF CHINA' The highly acclaimed exhibition, "The Great Bronze Age of China: An Exhibition from tne People's Republic of China," is at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth for a ten-week showing through Feb. 18, 1981. The largest exhibition ever mounted at the Kimbeli, the show includes 105 rare objects of bronze, jade and terra cotta which span China's entire Bronze Age, from about 1800 to 210 B.C. An international cultural event, this exhibition is the first one of its kind organized between the United States and China since diplomatic relations were established in January, 1979. Admission is free and open to the public. Because of the expected crowds, the Kimbell will be open three evenings during the exhibition. The special hours are: noon-5p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday; noon-7 p....

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

tH-? i£j ^ i\i Southwest Chinese Journal FEBRUARY 1981 1920 In 1920, General Pershing visited the 32 Chinese at Ellington Field and promised to continue to fight for their right to remain in the U.S. as aliens. Through his former aide, Mr. William Travis Page, this fight was finally won in 1922, five years after their first entry into the U.S. The Chinese still could not become naturalized citizens but this did mark a new level of acceptance for the Chinese in Texas. In 1924, a new national immigration law was passed by the U.S. Congress. It stated that any American who married an alien Chinese lost their citizenship. Pre- viously, a person marrying an American citizen became an American citizen. The law also established a quota of 105 per year which could not be filled because of the exclusion acts. The CACA fought this provision and in 1936, Chinese alien wives were granted a non- quota status. The CACA contributed their efforts to the repeal of the Chinese exclusion acts and work...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

& ijg 4£ Southwest Chinese Journal FEBRUARY 1931 CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION FOR SENIOR CITIZENS The CHINESE HEALTH SERVICE CENTER of Houston is sponsoring a Chinese New Year celebration party for Chinese senior citizens. The party will take place from 1:50 to 5:00 P.M. on Saturday, February 14, 1981, at the Chinese Lutheran Church, 9550 Bellaire Blvd. between S. Gessner and Corporate. (see map). Some delicate snacks and tea will be served free of charge. All Chinese senior citizens are welcome to attend the celebration. In addition to the New Year Celebration, partici- pants will receive a free blood pressure check-up, and be provided with a social security questions 5 answers session. Also, there will be demonstrations by a group of people who are best in cooking, pastry- making, sweater knitting, other handicrafts, callig- raphy, painting, picture-taking, Ta-Chieh boxing, mu- sic and opera appreciation at the party. Our senior citizens may choose to participate in any of the...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

FEBRUARY 1981 & £) ^ 4H Southwest Chinese Journal THE CHRONOLOGY OF THE HISTORY OF THE CHINESE IN HOUSTON: CITIZENSHIP AND CIVIL RIGHTS by Dr. Eductrd C. N. Chen 1860 On February 19, 1862, the United States Congress passed an act prohibiting "Coolie Trade" which was the first federal law directed against Chinese, Japanese, and other Asiatics. On June 1, 1868, the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of the State of Texas stated in Article I, Section 22 that "Importa- tion of persons under the name of "coolie" or any other name or designation . . . shall never be author- ized or tolerated by the laws of the State." 1870 In December 1869, the first large group of Chinese arrived in Texas to work on the Houston and Texas Central Railroad. Coming by way of St. Louis, the Chinese travelled down the Mississippi where the new- ly freedmen rioted at every stopover. In Texas, the white workers refused to work alongside the "pig- tailed Chinese." Thus both blacks and whites resented the arr...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

S ifo 0$ Southwest Chinese Journal FEBRUARY 1981 REFLECTIONS By WILLIAM DER BING Can we imagine, you and I, what it would be like to wake up one morning and find that newspapers are no more. Suppose, for one reason or another, publish- ing news had ceased and that over the breakfast table, at lunch and at dinner, or while seated in front of the fireplace in our recliner, there are no news- papers. Sunday mornings before church, there are no newspapers. What an empty feeling that would be for all of us. Then, is it no small wonder that dictators arm themselves with news media facilities? Whenever civil strife versus military rule occurs, would-be conquerors always button up news media facilities. They stifle freedom of the press. They use the news media facilities for party propaganda and personal glorification. Note the past history of these types - Goebels to Castro. Whenever revolutions occur, the first targets are the news dissemination points - the Middle East's unholy holies, t...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

FEBRUARY 1981 ^ ^ ^ west Chinese Journal caller also sent a copy of her position letter to the Editor of THE CHRONICLE. The first thing that is wrong here is the person being an "unidentified source." It's like the unknown comic wearing a paper sack over his head. He mumbles but doesn't want anyone to know who is doing the mumbling. The second thing that is untrue is that this "unidentified person" alleges to be the figurehead of the 30,000 members of the com- munity. We'd all like to know who passed away and left him in charge? There has been futile attempts by a few to wrest this "title" and bestow it among them- selves probably ever since there were Chinese in Hous- ton. True, there are "elected" officers within the many varying organizations but here again is an affront "to the truth in advertising" adage when anyone calls himself the leader of the 30,000, yet wants to main- tain anonymity. It couldn't be modesty, could it? GLENDA JOE wrote a very articulate letter to the editor...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

& ife ^ 4H Southwest Chinese Journal FEBRUARY 1981 KEYSTONE VALVE'S RICK CHEUNG By June Dove Leong \s Rick Cheung was a recipient of the Chinese Profes- sional Club's Scholarship Award..and is now Keystone Valve's $100,000 investment to help insure Keystone's international operations with interests in Asia. As a student at the University of Houston, prior to acquisition of a university degree, Rick's desire was to continue his education and simultaneously gain a foothold in a career. While searching for employment, Rick had a few offers, but Keystone Valve held the key to Rick's great- est potential..and its headquarter's office was conven- iently located in Houston. Rick wrote to the president of Keystone, then per- sonally visited him. Rick's self-assurance and frontal approach inspired the confidence of Keystone Valve's president to place his faith in him. Rick, only 2k yrs. is now accelerating a 2 year training program into lj years. Normally, only 30 yrs. old men and older ...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

february 1981 $3 i$j ^ Southwest Chinese Journal COMMUNITY NEWS CPC's scholarship selection committee has been busy reviewing applications and interviewing candi- dates for the CPC (Chinese Professional Club) awards. Mrs. MAMIE MOY, assistant professor of Chemistry at the University of Houston is chairing this activity. Winners will be introduced to the community at the CPC appreciation night. Congratulations are in order for .Mr. BILL MOON. a flight controller for many space missions. He was just promoted to head a section in the flight sup- port division. Bill is the only Asian supervisor of a technical section at The Johnson Space Center. bi; DER BING^ Sr. has DER BING plans for Space Shuttle activities during launch at Cape Canaveral and land- ing of the Shuttle at Ed- wards AFB in California. He will be the Protocol Officer responsible for the NASA Administrator, all Astronauts and VIPs. Between the two sites upwards of 50,000 guests in total are expected. Other Asians working ...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

& ift 4H Southwest Chinese Journal FEBRUARY 1981 HAIR WAVES By June Dove Leong Ron Chow Is the fabulous beautician who labored 12 hours to achieve gorgeous sister Christine's #10 hair style, which helped to win for Photographer Alvin Wong Gee, the "Picture of the Month" Award presented by the Houston Professional Photographers Guild. Ron Chow has traveled a long way from dutiful service in Uncle Sajn's Army in Vietnam to service in his plush and new beauty salon..Hairwaves..located at 9625 Hillcroft, at the intersection of Hillcroft and Braeswood in Southwest Houston. Ron Chow's service provides for pampering the individual..literally..from head to toes..from hair- styles to pedicures. Together with his associate Marg- aret Radford..full hair care services are available., including..shampoos..tints..permanents..and personal coiffures. Currently, there are four hair stylists, two assistants to take care of shampoos and tints..and one manicurist who gives special treatment to one'...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

FEBRUARY 1981 ^ Southwest Chinese Journal ■ ■ DIETITIAN MARIA HU KELLY By June Dove Leong Maria Hu Kelley acquired her Masters in biology in San Antonio at Incarnate Word College..did her under- graduate in nutrition..spent a brief time in lab work.. then returned to nutrition..worked in a county hospital in San Antonio for two years..including a half year of training there. The county hospital in San Antonio gave her the opportunity to see many and varied cases. When she came to Houston to the Methodist Hospital, she bacame a part of the cardiology dietetic department. Methodist Hospital patients come from all over the world..Finland.. Mexico..France..etc. due in great part to Dr. DeBakey and his team of doctors. Surgery is performed on 300 people per week..for open heart surgery alone. Methodist Hospital is amazing, believes Maria, for it is a 1000 bed hospital and there are a variety of cases from every specialty. The Texas Medical Center is one of the larg- est medical centers. ...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

& if; If 4ll Southwest Chinese Journal FEBRUARY 1981 SOUTHWEST CHINESE JOURNAL CELEBRATES 5TH ANNIVERSARY By June Dove Leong wit^ this February edition, the SOUTHWEST CHINESE JOURNAL be- comes 5 years old. It has reach- ed a milestone in the annals of of TIME. The SOUTHWEST CHINESE JOUR- NAL first gained Houston city- wide attention when it became a Lynn Ashby feature in the Hous- ton Post. Chinese community recogni- tion came when the Chinese Amer- ican Citizens Alliance, Houston Chapter, awarded Director GENE L. LEE, of Lee Printing § Office Supplies, a plaque for outstand- ing contribution to community service. Due to the rapid growth of the city and the influx in pop- ulation of people of Chinese heritage, a need to serve more fully was met in expansion of its membership and ad- ministrative body. On December 17th, 1980, a meeting was held of the old and new stockholders in Attorney WILLIAM Y. SIM's office. A decision was reached to con- tinue the report of news pertaining t...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

FEBRUARY 1981 & ifc ^8. Southwest Chinese Journal MISS CHINATOWN HOUSTON SANDY LEE PHOTO Al v i n SANDY LEE, a student at the University of Houston will leave February 10th for San Francisco to compete in the MISS CHINATOWN USA pageant which will be Saturday, February 14th. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gene L. Leet. Sandy is sponsored by the Houston Lodge CACA. ■ fv CPC NEWS It is still not too late to purchase tickets for the Chinese Professional Club's 27th Annual New Year's Ball. This year's program features the Liu Sisters who will perform "Two Little Sisters" and drum dances. Lie Mei Hua and Tammy Cheng will do Bow and Mongolia dances, and Thomas Tsao will play the Nan Hu, a Chinese string instrument. Highlight of the evening will be Sandy Lee, Miss Chinatown Houston, who will perform a Western dance routine to the music of the "Orange Blossom Special." Her instructor is Carol Walker, choreographer for the Houston Oiler Derrick Dolls. The ball will be at the Marriott...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Southwest Chinese Journal — 1 February 1981

/ Southwest Chinese Journal Sr & & VOL.6 NO. 2 FEBRUARY 1981 SUBSCRIPTION $12.00 PER YEAR Phone: (713) 784-6640 P.O. Box 18603 Houston, TX 77023 HAPPY NEW YEAR 4679-YEAR OF THE ROOSTER The Chinese community is getting ready to ring in the year of the Rooster, 4679 on the Chinese Lunar calendar. New Year is the most important Chinese Fes- tival. It takes place sometime between January 21 and February 19 of each year. February 5, 1981 is the first day of the year of the cock. According to Oriental legend, it began many cen- turies ago with Buddha. Feeling that the Chinese spirit was sorely in need of overhaul, Buddha called together all the animals. Only 12 creatures showed up. Buddha honored them in the order of their arrival, giving each of the 12 animals a year of its own. First came the aggressive Rat, then the hardwork- ing Ox. After these bounded the smiling Tiger and his crony, the cautious Cat. Soon appeared the spirit- ed Dragon, followed by the wise Snake. After them...

Publication Title: Southwest Chinese Journal
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
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