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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

spondent of American Gardening, who says he has killed plantain, wild cu cumber and poison ivy in that way. A thicket of ailanthus was also de stroyed by . it, the tops being cut off and the kerosene poured into the top, it is said. In the case of weeds which do not sprout from the roots, the oil would no doubt kill them, but in the case of the ailanthus or of sassafras, say, or any other plant which grows readily from pieces of roots, it would scarcely destroy them. The living shoot the oil touched would be de stroyed, but not the underground roots. Poison ivy and sassafras can be killed by a season or two of per sistency in permitting no leaves to grow. In the case of sassafras shoots from around a living tree, they cannot be exterminated, the tree itself fur nishing a fresh supply of sap for a new crop of shoots as fast as one lot has been cleared away. Kerosene is all right for destroying the crowns of plants; and daisies, dandelions and many weeds could be gotten rid of in this...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

16 You Don't Have to S« ELIEVE WHAT WE SAY! We don't ask you to. We only want to call your D attention to a few facts regarding the TUBULAR SEPARATOR, and you can find out for yourself that what we say te so. . We claim that the Tubular is much \ easier to run than any other make. Now prove this by turning the crank of any i other kind, and then that of a Tubular of similar capacity. You can tell which of the two is the easiest to run. - You want the easiest running kind. We claim f that the Tubular bowl is easier to cleanse than any other make. Make the agent of \ any other kind take his bowl apart, and spread the parts out on a table, then get the Tubular agent to do the same. You don't need anyone to tell you which of the two is going to be the easiest to clean, nor that that is just the machine you want. Then ) notice how high up the supply can is on all other kinds, almost out of reach to pour milk into, and look how low and handy the Tubular Supply can is. You can see for your...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

THE RANCH . VOL. XXI. NO. 21. PROSSER, WASHINGTON The Agricultural, Commercial and Manufacture* ing* Center of the Lower Yakima Valley. Prosser is located on the main line of the Northern Pacific Railway, be tween Spokane and Puget Sound, and 50 miles southeast of North Yakima, the nearest large town. It is on the soutn bank of the Yaki ma river, which has a fall of 20 feet adjacent to the city, furnishing an ex cellent water power at present only partly developed. At a comparatively small cost, 6000 horse power can be created at this point which may be profitably used in various ways. In addition to the power now used for pumping water to irrigate the 2000 acres under the canal of Prosser Fahs SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, NOVEMBER 1, 1904. Land & Irrigation Co., and for the city water works, and for a small flour mill and electric light plant, there is at this point one of the best opportuni ties in the state for a flour mill with a capacity of 200 to 500 barrels a day; for a cold stor...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

2 HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Communications for this department may be sent to Mrs. S. C. Butcher, Ellensburg, Wash., or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. To Prepare Fowls. Chickens, turkeys, geese and ducks are better killed the day before using, and during the winter, two or three days' keeping will be no injury. Do not feed the fowls in the morning which are to be killed during the day. The best way is to tie the feet to gether, hang from a horizontal pole, tie the wings together over the back with a strip of soft, cotton cloth, then make an incision in the throat or cut the head off and allow them to hang until the blood has ceased to drip. Chickens only, should be scalded, other fowls and game should be picked dry until the feathers are re moved, except the soft down, then pour hot water on; this will swell the fowl and the down can be easily rubbed of with the palm of the hand, wipe dry and singe over ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

THE RANCH Office: 38 Downs Building. MILLER FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor, Associate Editors: F. WALDEN. H. L. BLANCHARD. Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month. Subscription, in advance, one year, 60 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. Seattle subscribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper ls sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue ls received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription is shown on your paper by * address label containing your name. Falling to receive the paper regularly, yo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES Horticultural Notes. E. G. Grindrod of Ellensburg, Wash., who is a very successful market gard ner as well as a fruit grower, writes the editor of this department under date of October 14, as follows: "I understand that some of the Yakima fruit growers are recommending and practicing the plan of picking their apples and storing them awhile in large boxes to go through a sweat be fore packing. Now, I wish to ask if in your opinion there is any benefit derived from so doing; and if so is beneAcial in all climates and- under all circumstances, or is only necessary where apples are picked during warm weather? Please answer fully. Know ing how busy you are I willl not ask a personal reply, but that you answer through The Ranch." I would say in reply to the above inquiry that so far as I know this is not practiced among the Yakima grow ers. 1 do know that many thousands of boxes of apples are going out now direct from the orchard to the pack ing shed and from there t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

Puyallup Valley Berry Shipments. Puyallup Valley Tribune: The Berry Association has closed up the rasp berry business and finds the receipts of red raspberries for the season of 1904 to be 44,445 crates, for which cash was received to the amount of $43,633.48, which is very close to one dollar per crate. This is a most excellent showing when is is known that the full car load shipments, consisting of 17,465 crates, averaged but 62% cents per crate, and during the three rainy days of July more than 6,000 crates of wet berries were marketed. There were 18,831 crates marketed at an average of $1.35 per crate, which is a marvelous showing for this year, when every class of fruit was so very plentiful. The carload shipments of red rasp berries made by the association did not prove a success for several rea sons. The climatic conditions left the berries in bad condition for long shipments; the 20,000-pound minimum required by the railroad company was a serious drawback, as the refriger at...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

6 THE DAIRY Tuberculosis in Dairy Cows. Pulman, Wash., Oct. 22, 1904. Editor The Ranch: I notice the fol lowing article appearing in your publi cation of October 15th, 1904. "Seventeen cows belonging to the herd of R. Sartorl, Seattle, were slaughtered the other day after having been pro nounced by Dr. S. B. Nelson, the state veterinarian to be afflicted with tuberculo sis. When the animals were killed, three government Inspectors were present, who made a careful examination of the car casses of the animals. They passed the meat of ten of the animals as nt for sale on the markets, and In two others no trace whatever of the disease could be found. Thus once again is proven the un certainty of the tuberculin test. This test was first applied by Dr. Kidd and veri fied by Dr. Nelson himself. The milk of Mr. Sartori's herd, which is one of the fin est in western Washington and principally of the Jersey breed, is sold in Seattle, and therefore the announcement of the v'eterin- arian's fin...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

Sunnyside Canal to be Extended. Over 55,000 acres ot land in Yakima County will be turned over to the state of Washington by the govern ment for reclamation by the extension of the Sunnyside canal under a con tract to be entered into between the state and the Washington Irrigation Company, owning the canal. The pe tition for selection of the lands by the state was made early in the year, but serious opposition was aroused by the Yakima Development pauypany, which planned another irrigation scheme involving the same lands. The latter company enlisted the sympathy of prominent business men of North Yakima and public meetings were held and resolutions passed declaring against the expediency of the pro posed selection by the state. Protests were filed in Washington city by the Yakima Commercial Club and the Industrial Protective Asso ciation, of Sunnyside, on the ground that a larger area could be reclaimed by the proposed plan of the Yakima Development Company, and on the further groun...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

8 PROSSER, WASHINGTON (Continued from page 1) $300 an acre, depending upon improve ments and location. The company has sold practically all its lands, now holding less than 100 acres, which are cut into small tracts and will be sold only to actual settlers, at $125 to $150 an acre. Within one half mile of the depot are a few plat ted acres which the company is selling at $250 to $'300 an acre, including wa ter rights for irrigation. On the north side of the river, and a few miles below the town, is the lower end of the Sunnyside canal of the Washington Irrigation Company. This is by far the largest irrigation enterprise in this state and ranks as one of the greatest and most success ful systems on the continent. The main canal is now 60 miles long with about 400 miles of lateral or main distributing ditches covering in all about 65,000 acres of irrigable lands, about half of which is now in cultivation. The last 15 miles of this canal has only been built during the past year and it ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

it brings an annual rental of $10 to $15 an acre, but the usual custom is a crop rental with one-half to three fifths of the hay in the stack for the land owner. This makes the receipts very much greater than on the cash basis. About 2500 acres of Yakima valley irrigated lands are devoted to hops. The average yield is about 1700 pounds per acre, though some well cultivated fields run as high as 2700 to 3000 pounds. The total cost of production is be tween 7c and 8c a pound for cured hops in the bale, 4c being the cost of picking. The total yield of Yakima county this year will be about four million pounds, or about one-half the entire hop crop of the state. New York, Oregon, California and Washing ton, in the order named, produce all the hops grown in the United States. THE TOWN OF PROSSER The Yakiina River, showing to the left, will be navigable for ten miles as soon as the dam now under construction by the make tributary to Prosser an extensive district, already under a high state...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

10 POULTRY ——— H. L. BLANCHARD Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. . Starting in Poultry Business The Ranch Please address my copy of The Ranch from now on to New Westminster, B. C, which I think will be my permanent address, as I am going to start a small ranch near New Westminster. I shall probably be asking for infor mation through your columns and do my best to secure subscribers for your paper. lam specially interest ed in the Poultry Department as I in tend going into that branch, com bined with gardening. Have had little actual experience with poultry but intend starting in on a small scale, have of course read a lot. Have got six acres near trolley car line between Vancouver and New Westminster; land been slashed for many years and a lot .of the timber taken off, burnt, and what is left is mostly rotten. My present int...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

iEGAL NOTES I B. J. BORYER 1 |f This department Is open to all the patrons iSfThe Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters 0111 be answered free In these columns. If I Legal notes | R. J. BORYER This department is open to all the patrons (The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters HI be answered free In these columns. If reply by letter is desired enclose a fee of Bm Dollar to R. J. Boryer, care The Ranch. I Who are Qualified Voters. I All male persons over the age of II years, possessing the following alifications, shall be entitled to vote |t all elections: (1) All persons who at time of Adoption, of constitution of this state hat were qualified electors. I (2) All other male persons over fie age of 21 years, citizens of the Suited States who have lived in the . state one year, and in the county ninety days, and in the city, town, I sard or precinct 30 days immediately I receding the election at which they | iter to vote, who shall be able to read l |ii(l speak the English language: Pro vided...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

12 LIVE STOCK National Live Stock Association. Denver, Colo., Oct. 17, 1904. To the members of the National Live Stock Association: Mr. Charles F. Martin, secretary of this associa tion, almost since its organization, died suddenly at Greeley, Colorado, on September 21st, 1904, as a result of hemorrhage of the lungs. At the time of his death, Mr. Martin was enroute from Denver to Casper, Wyoming, on Association business. At a meeting of the Board of Control held in Denver to consider the va cancy caused by the death of Mr. Martin, it was decided that no appoint ment would be made until the conven ing of the next annual convention, which is to be held in Denver the week of January 9th, 1905. The af fairs of the association were placed under the active direction of a com mittee, consisting of Fred P. John son, George W. Ballantine and George L. Goulding, of Denver, with H. E. Kennedy as clerk in charge of the secretary's office. Communications may be addresseed to H. E. Kennedy. Clerk...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

Dual Purpose Shorthorns. The breeder of the Shorthorn that makes both beef and milk should not feel discouraged if any one tells him his class of cattle is going out of exist ence. It is true that the milking strain of the Shorthorn has been growing less and less in numbers, and we need a re vival. In our country the value of this strain is not so well appreciated as is the case over in Great Britain. At least two-thirds of the cattle of that country are of this type. They make milk and butter with the best, and at the same time breed calves which make steers of the best butcher type. We hear that there are several herds of this type in the New England states, but few elsewhere. One herd in Mas sachusetts tracing to Arabella has had top crosses of the Princess, the Duch ess, the Constance and the Waterloo families, and shows cows weighing from 1,200 to 1,«00 pounds, with milk records of 40 to 50 pounds per day, and very persistent milkers, some making 11.000 pounds per year. These c...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

14 ADVERTISEMENT State Issues — Moral and Political JUDGE TURNER'S COMMISSION CLAUSE. "Mr. Turner offered the following as an additional section: "A railroad commission is hereby estab lished, which will consist of three commis sioners. The terms of office of such com missioners shall be for four years and they shall be appointed by the governor by and with the advice and consent of the senate. "The members of said commission shall be qualified electors. Said commission shall have such powers and perform such duties and the members receive such compensa tion as may be provided by law." "This amendment was lost by a vote of 26 to 37." — Official journal of the constitu tional convention, page 325. Issues in the present campaign in Washington for the election of state officers and members of the legislature are of two classes, political and moral. 1. Shall there be created an appoint ive, regulative railroad commission with power to regulate rates and rem edy such abuses as may be fou...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

Sb'tfire. Certainly the people of the $ state have some reason to complain |i that promises have been violated, that m, legislatures have not been honest and »upright, that conventions have been Ms'manipulated. Ugh As an instrument for the correction «of these evils the eDmocratic party Mot' the state has offered the passage of ■Va direct primary law under which, all ■■rand Mates for nomination are voted Ijßupon by the voters in the same man" IHner as all nominees are now voted up ftlon at elections. This system will pfiplace the nomination of candidates Kdirectly in the hands of the voters, as Swell as the choice between the candi- VJldates nominated. This system has [■worked well in other states. Its pur- Hpose is to bring the government into HSlcloser conformity with the popular |Mwil.. No promise on this issue has gSbeen made by the Republican party. In Measures and Men. M The present political contest is one ■Not men as well as measures. Con [Btvention declarations and promises...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1904

16 What Others -Say i j^^^^ft^" *^ '"^H This is a sample of many testimonials that we receive and speaks better than we '^^^SSm\\m%^ih ■'er\.\\V\V,. i can of the efficiency of the Tubular Separator. _Jk_T__E_. Cat. *■■•»'■ : j Winchester, Ida, Sept. 17, 1904. I-'-^y^|^^l^^SHß':' ;iM -l We received the No. 2 Tubular Cream Separator on Tuesday, the 6th. We are iff , ~? ' ■• te well pleased with it. as it is neat in appearance, beautiful, compared with others, and j _^^-Ss__i_6_tW iwe cons^er ** Perfect in operation. We tried it first with the same skimmed milk that >l '-S^^w9hHi_^Hh>l^ - ka(* een skimmed by hand, and we got nearly as much as we got by the first hand -^toa»JU|_y_F; j&ra -' i mSH.v. ;' skimming. Then we saved the separated cream from three milkings, and we got ""'{BRS^^'liSiß^^^l^^S^ just aout as much butter again as we could churn from the same amount of milk and ••^W^siflL^ Uili'- iS.jJsJIwF- skimming by hand. Thus we can recommend it to anyone wanting a goo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1904

THE RANCH l . . : \-'*'.-?->i'&-:'y-Y'!'''^ '•'■"' VOL. XXI. NO. 22. Road-Making Machinery. No question is of more importance to the farmers of the Northwest than the improvement of highways. Slip shod construction must in future give way to scientific methods, under direc tion of competent engineers/whose every efforts are bent to make all roadwork the most serviceable and permanent possible. - Many hund reds of thousands of dollars have been thrown away in every part of the state in building roads in an aimless haphazard fashion. Good road-mak ing machinery is the best investment a country can make —and in many cases they are purchasing modern graders, rock-crushers, etc. We re produce herewith a photograph show ing one of the latest and most modern rock-crushers, as it appeared at the re cent Salem, Ore., fair, where it was operated in crushing rock to build some experimental roads on the grounds under the direction of the U. S. Government Good Roads officials. Beall &...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1904

o HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Communications for this department may be sent to Mrs. S. C Butcher. Ellensburg. Wash., or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered: contrlbu ttona for publication are welcome. "Thanksgiving" One day of each year is set apart for giving thanks unto the Lord for blessings received from His hand dur ing the year. It comes late in the fall, after all the crops have been gathered in and we can see how very bountiful the harvest has been. The farmers, it seems to me, can see more reasons for thankfulness than any other class of people. They live so close to nature and gather with their own hands the grain from the fields and fruit from the trees. It comes directly from the storehouse of God. It is true that those who have money may buy, but the wage earners of the city and town live up to their income so closely that they have but little to show for their labors and seeming but little to be thankful for, when compared with the average ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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