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Elephind.com contains 8,852 items from Stylus, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

James H. Thompon, Ph. G. “Sanford Jpharmacy” 1525 Washington Street Corner West Brookline BOSTON John P. McQuade h Cigars anb & No. 1336 Washington Street BOSTON D. J. WHOLLEY Manufacturer Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Fine Boots and s>boe? ... of Every Description ... xa 1322 Washington St. Factory at Lynn Rare Bargains in Elegant Samples We Retail at Wholesale Prices FINE REPAIRING LOW PRICES

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DIRIGE, LUX ALMA. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

DIRIGE, LUX ALMA. A Latin Version of Cardinal Newman’s Poem. Dirige per tenebras circum, Lux Alma, jacentes, Dirige Tu recto tramite prorsus iter! Nox cadit: e laribus longe longeque pererro, Dirige Tu recto tramite prorsus iter! Invigila pedibus : non illas cernere quaero Sedes distantes : sat gradus unus erit. Haud ita semper eram ; supplex nec voce precabar Tutus ut ingrederer Te pneeunte viam. Quern mihi concepi cursum hunc ego sponte secutus, Tu rege jam recto tramite prorsus iter! Me pavidum tenuit fastus, splendorque diei Fallax : ast serves ne memor ilia, precor ! Multos hosce annos favit tua copia coeli, Hsec mihi, nil dubito, diriget usque pedem Perque lacus, scopulos, torrentes, perque viarum Devia, dum tandem tempora noctis eant, Mane et splendescant Coelestes ore sereno, Quos breviter raptos jam mihi fixit amor. Fautor.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LEAD, KINDLY LIGHT, [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

LEAD , KINDLY LIGHT, Lead, Kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom, Lead Thou me on ! The night is dark, and I am far from home — Lead Thou me on ! Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see The distant scene,—one step enough for me. I was not ever thus, nor prayed that Thou Shouldst lead me on. I love to choose and see my path; but now, Lead Thou me on ! I loved the garish day, and spite of fears, Pride ruled my will: remember not past years. So long Thy power hath blest me, sure it still Will lead me on, O’er moor and fen, o’er crag and torrent, till The night is gone, And with the morn, those angel faces smile Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AN EARLY TRANSLATION OF VIRGIL. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

AN EARLY TRANSLATION OF VIRGIL. (Competition Essay.) Richard Stanyhurst, ever since the publication of his Virgil, has been considered by almost every writer who mentions him a legitimate butt for ridicule. His was one of the first translations of Virgil of which is about all that can be said in favor of his work. According to Professor Small, the works of Virgil had passed through ninety editions before the year 15°°? ai *d were read generally by young and old before Gavin Douglas finished his translation, 1513. This, the first metrical version of any classical author into English, was not published until 1553. Surrey’s version of the second and fourth books was published not quite three weeks after the first edition of Tottel’s Miscellany, 1557. It was reserved for an Irishman to write the most abused book in our language. Stanyhurst was born at Dublin about 1545, and entered University College in 1563. Thus, although Ireland was responsible for his birth, England was guilty of ed...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AN ESTIMATE OF THE STYLUS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

AN ESTIMATE OF THE STYLUS. We have been allowed to extract from a private letter the following estimate of The Stylus: “A welcome visitor was The Boston Stylus, recovered like Rip Van Winkle from its long sleep. Like all brain-workers it has risen refreshed and invigorated, and I trust a little nap now and again, the first week of the month, will be all-sufficient to keep it in health and strength. But, “Heu me miserum ,” it needs pabulum, too; so I hope that the “benevolent students” won’t refuse it even to the poor Domi Editor, whose appeal was really heart-touching. I have been praying for the poor boy that he may be so “deluged” that he won’t need another joke till June. I must say I have been much interested in the little paper from “the broken threads of memories” woven together so pleasingly by Father Cunningham, to the orchestra sleigh ride in the last number. All the articles are good, Monkeys, Bathybius, and love story specially so. Then lam not sure that “Moon Island Fabl...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MOON ISLAND FABLES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

MOON ISLAND FABLES. 111. The Prep and The Square Root of Minus One. About the time of the final examinations, a pensive Prep was sitting one afternoon at low tide, on one of rocky ledges by which Moon Island attempts to keep the boisterous sea at bay. He was waiting for the tide to come in, for the weather was warm, and all Preps are amphibious in warm weather. As he had nothing better to do, he was indulging in a mental process, which may with sufficient accuracy be called thinking. Properly speaking, however, he was engrossed in thought —in a wide sense of the term, thought; or more exactly he was lost in thought.* Pie had comfortably composed himself to think of “ The Boston of the Future.” It was so pleasant there on Moon Island, with cooling breezes searching out every warm nook of his personality, while the cares that infested his days, and a fraction also of his nights, were some two or three miles inland, to link fancies unto fancies, to build for himself out of the abundant...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE CLOSING SCENE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

THE CLOSING SCENE. “ Earth’s but a painted stage.” Ay?—and this world A panoramic play, An empty show whose acted scenes are furled Within the past? Ah, nay, — Dire tragedy where Time enacts his role, Oppressing Life’s poor day, As base conspirator, and hero Soul, Doth foil the fiend Decay. Why do these mortal actors come and go? Who planned the play may tell. “Mere puppets, they?” Then why doth Heaven glow When mines would fain excel, While eager Seraph throngs from out the spheres Observe the action swell, The riving conflict, seething joys and tears That from the tumult well. See where the silent toiling years have rolled The scenery from the past, Where oft the knell of glory’s dream was tolled That finds its grave at last; See where on History’s mottled page portrayed Great nations late were massed, What ruins of phantom grandeur there displayed, While mankind stands aghast! The crumbling East is dead, and now the end Of circling scenery In westward course draws near; while lou...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IVANHOE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

IVANHOE. Competition Essay. Whatever may be the opinion of contemporary critics ouching Scott’s ability as a poet and novelist, it must truthfully be conceded that in his especial department of poetry as well as in his conception of the novel, he stands pre-eminently first. Critics may disagree as to whether he was most successful as a poet or as a prose writer, but had he written no other poem than Marmion, his fame as a poet would have been secure. Likewise, were Ivanhoe the sole prose production of his remarkable genius, he might have laid aside his pen confident in the verdict of posterity. For, if Marmion is Scott’s greatest poetical conception, Ivanhoe is his truest prose creation. Facile frincefs it emerges from that rich and almost inexhaustible source, whence gushed forth in continuous flow that brilliant stream of novels, commencing with Waverley and continuing until at last the nerveless fingers refused longer to grasp the once vigorous pen. Many noble and beautiful chara...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ALUMNI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

ALUMNI. The task of writing these notes was assigned to us at the last moment, the regular editor for some reason having been prevented from sending in his monthly budget. This fact will excuse the brevity and omissions of a column which the Editors of the Stylus are desirous of making as full as possible. One of our most important items is the marriage of Timothy W. Coaklev, ’B4, to Mi ss Elizabeth J. Smith, on Monday, February 5, at 9 a. m. The marriage took place at St. Patrick’s Church, Roxbury, Father Aiken performing the ceremony, and was accompanied by all the rites of the church that lend beauty and solemnity to the Sacrament. The music of the Mass was particularly fine. Dr. Francis A. Barnes, a class-mate of Mr. Coakley, was best man, and Miss Agnes Coakley, his sister, bridesmaid. Many of the class of ’B4 were present. We noticed Father Coan, Dr. Eugene A. McCarthy, Hon. Philip J. Farley, Mr. Charles A. Carroll, Mr. Jas. F. Aylward, besides Father Brosnahan, who taught the...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN. O Mary, queen and advocate above, Through whom the peace of heaven came to earth, Sweet mother mine, whose spotless womb gave birth To Christ, the ceaseless fount of all our love: As pure as cloudless skies ; the vestal dove That dips its snow-white pinions silently Beneath the crystal stream, Thou art to me, And sweeter far than e’er my words can prove. O fair! O purest! stretch Thy kindly hand To lead me safe to life’s eternal shore, And show to mine exiled eyes that Fatherland, Where angel voices call me back once more, And bid me gladly enter there as guest, To dwell with God in never-ending rest. T.J. G. ’95.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

EXCHANGES. We have read with some attention the Exchanges of this month, and have been disagreeably impressed by the inaccuracy and the extravagance of assertion that pass no doubt with some for fine, emphatic writing. If the undisciplined mind or the too eager enthusiasm of the contributor commits one or the other of these sins against good taste, certainly the Journal’s censor or editor-in-chief should never condone or overlook it. Too many college papers bear painful evidence of careless supervision and ill-considered preparation. Out of half a hundred examples this will suffice to illustrate the wildness of statement just mentioned: “ Supremeacy in football means not only supremeacy in this one thing alone, but superiority in all other branches as well, intellectually and artistically A Eternal vigilance is the price of a good college journal. The Reveille of Norwich University, Vt., has an article entitled “A Pessimistic View,” which, although by no means illwritten in the main...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Boston College Stylus. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

Boston College Stylus. PUBLISHED MONTHLY. Terms of Subscription: One dollar in advance, post-paid. Single copies, fifteen cents. Advertising Rates : Address T. F. Murphy, Advertising Agent, Boston College. The Stylus is published bj the students of Boston College as an aid to their literary improvement. As the paper is, for the most part, devoted to matters which may not prove interesting to the general reader, it must look for its support, chiefly to the students and graduates and their friends. These, we trust, will need no exhortation to extend to us their patronage. Address, BOSTON COLLEGE STYLUS, 761 Harrison Ave., Boston, Mass. EDITORS : Editor-in-Chief, James A. Dorsey, ’94 Albert E. Macdonald, ’94. Francis H. Houston, ’94. William L. Sullivan, ’95. Charles J. Martell, ’96. Thomas J. Young, 97. Business Manager : Martin A. Foley, ’95. Assists. : Stephen A. Bergin, ’96 Timothy J. Collins, ’95. Press of The Angel Guardian, 92 Ruggles St. FEBRUARY, 1594.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EDITORIAL. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

EDITORIAL . We have noticed for some time a general and discreditable lack of interest in what is one of the most entertaining exercises of the College. We refer to the monthly elocution. We make it the subject of an editorial because we know that our private convictions are shared by others, who feel an injustice is done to them in asking them to spend an hour listening to a perfunctory, ill-prepared declamation. The time could surely be employed more pleasantly, if not more profitably, and no one who has any regard for the rights of others, or any respect for himself, would deliberately attempt the declamation of a piece which he has not even committed to memory. In many schools to speak publicly in the hall is a privilege which all covet, but few may hope to enjoy. Competitions are held each month, and he is a lucky fellow who is chosen to represent his class at the monthly Public Declamation. With a number here, sufficiently large to justify the writing of these remarks, things ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DOMI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

DOMI. NIRVANA. It seems I’m floating on a shoreless sea, With nought above me but the boundless blue. Ah me! what a misery for man to be, And to live in a wmrld of uniform hue. I’ll seek Nirvana and I’ll rest at last, I’ll labor to die till I’m thoroughly dead, And the monotone of life is forever past; But stay What’s the matter with painting the city red ! A. Buddhist. There is a marked contrast between the news from Boston College as published in the Herald and in the Globe. The editor of this column is an interested observer of the difference. As it is his duty to give a monthly chat about college affairs, every scrap of news is grist for his mill. The grist obtainable from the Boston Herald is very meagre. \\ hose fault is it? We are confident the fault does not lie with the managers of the Herald. We have grounds of complaint, then, we think, if the student who undertook to keep the public acquainted with our doings, deprives us of what other colleges have. Character manifests ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CLASS NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

CLASS NOTES. The Class of Philosophy had a disputation at which Father Rector was present January 9. The Theses were from Major Logic. Richard A. Smith defended, and John A. Burke objected. The next disputation will be on February n. David , A. Regan will defend, M. A. Sullivan and Francis X. Crawford will object. The Theses are from Ontology. The treatise on Ethics was begun on February 7, with Fr. Russo’s De Morali Pbilosopbia Praelectiones as the text book. The class of ’96 have already started the base-ball fever, and the Manager will soon have the candidates at the training board. Notwithstanding the loss of T. A. Emmett and H. J. McDermott, two of last year’s best players, the outlook for the coming season is brighter than ever. The Academy of Second Grammar have abolished the Reading Circle of the Society, and henceforth are to be known as the Debating Academy of Second Grammar. At a special meeting of Third Grammar B, called on January 16, it was decided to form a literary a...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FULTON DEBATING SOCIETY. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

FULTON DEBATING SOCIETY. At a special meeting held on Jan. 19th, the third Preliminary Debate took place. The question “Resolved, that the Freedom ot the Press should be restricted” was debated in the affirmative by J. A. Dorsey, ’94, and Thomas J. Golding, ’95 ; in the negative by A. E. Macdonald, ’94, and M. J. Scanlan, ’95. On the merit of the debate and of the question the house decided in the affirmative. The election of officers took place at the first regular meeting, February 9. Much interest was taken in the event as the President to be elected, if not himself a debater, will be the presiding officer at the Public Debate to be held in May next. Mr. Quinn', the Moderator of the Society, presided. When nominations for office of Presidency were called for, the name of J. C. Drum, ’94, was proposed by J. A. Dorsey, ’94, whose motion was seconded by Francis H. Houston, ’94. The other candidate was Wm. L. Sullivan, ’95, the actual President during the preceding term, who was nomi...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ATHLETICS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

ATHLETICS. A double pleasure was in store for those who attended the indoor meeting of the B. A. A. on the evening of February 11. They had not only the satisfaction of witnessing the breaking of two world's records, but the privilege as well of testing our new college yell, and the encouraging effects of its short, snappy, yet resonant notes. What we lacked in numbers was more than made up in enthusiasm, and the way we sent out that “ B. C. Rah!” must have been an eye- opener to many present, who have entertained rather vague ideas concerning the athletic tendencies of Boston College. We were put in good humor in the early part of the evening by the excellent showing made by our youthful prep. O’Brien, who succeeded in getting over the mark just one fraction of a second behind the first man in the trial heat of the 40-yards dash. The winner of the heat, by the way, captured one of the prizes in finale. It was a little after ten o’clock when we heard the signal which started Purcell...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SOCIETIES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

SOCIETIES . Meetings of the Senior Sodality were suspended during the examinations. They have been duly resumed with an increased membership, twenty postulants having been recently admitted. Owing to the efforts of the Director this Society is now the best represented organization of the college in membership. In the future, meetings will be held upon Thursdays. The Junior Sodality has now a membership of twentyfour, which will soon be increased by the reception of a large number of postulants. No rehearsals of the Orchestra were held during January. The preparation for examinations and the examinations themselves took all the time and energy of the members. One of the oldest and most prominent members, Mr. William J. McKenna, ’96, who has so ably presided over the base viol since the organization of the orchestra, has been obliged to resign on account of sickness. His place will be taken by John Hennelly, ist Reed. The younger members of the Athenaeum are rehearsing the Easter plav...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE EXAMINATION MARKS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

THE EXAMINATION MARKS. The second term began Monday morning, February sth. The marks of the students for the term were read and to the following testimonials were awarded : Class of Rhetoric: William L. Sullivan, John J. Kirby. Class of Poetry : Charles J. Martell, John J. McCarthy. Class of First Grammar: Leo O’Neill. Class of Second Grammar : John J. Hayes. Class of Third Grammar : Daniel J. Chapman, Benjamin W. Teeling, George F. McLaughlin. Class of First Rudiments: Jones Corrigan, Eugene F. Feeley, Thomas J. Lavelle, Francis P. Conlin. Class of Second Rudiments : Arthur W. Fogarty. Class of First Mathematics : John J. Kirby. Class of Second Mathematics : Charles J. Martell, James H. Devilin, Michael J. Butler. Class of Third Mathematics : Leo O’Neill, George F. McLaughlin. Class of First Algebra: Charles J. O’Brien, Francis P. Conlin, Daniel J. Desmond, Thomas H. Mi ley. Class of Second Algebra: Jones Corrigan, Sylvester P. Sullivan, John Graham, Patrick D. Cronin, Daniel J. Ga...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BOSTON COLLEGE, [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1894

BOSTON COLLEGE, 761 Harrison Avenue. This Institution, under the care of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, is intended for Day Scholars only. The Classical Department begins the study of the ancient languages and conducts the student through the ordinary collegiate course to graduation. The course in the English Department lasts four years, and embraces such branches as are requisite for a non-profes-sional or business life. The first session begins on the first Monday in September, the second, on the first Monday In February. Terms : $30.00 per session of five months, payable in advance. Catalogues may be obtained at the Catholic bookstores, or at the College. Rev. Edward I. Devitt, S. J. President.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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