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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1985

WHEN SANTA RAN OUT OF TOYS © COPYRIGHT 1985 One Christmas, I was very young We had no tree or trimrrtings hung No money, and nothing to sell, And Mama wasn't feeling well, Dad working hard to earn our bread. With dreams of Santa in our head We started out, brother and me To find ourselves a Christmas tree. We walked and looked for quite a while Without a word or even a smile, Until we found this holly tree Full of red berries as could be. With a hatchet could we chop it down? would it lose its berries on the ground? It looked so huge standing there alone We wondered could we drag it home? We chopped and hacked for quite a spell After a while the huge tree fell. We jerked and pulled it through the trees Our feet and hands about to freeze. We talked about what Dad would say If we lost its foliage on the way. When we got home tired, cold and sad, Our pretty tree now looked so bad, It made us almost start to bawl As we leaned it on the parlor wall. We knew we must some trimmings make Be...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1985 BACKROADS Continued from page 24. 00.0 (0.0) From the intersection of US 58 and the Parkway, we will head west toward Hillsville, Virginia on US ss. 1.4 (1-4) The long high ridge we can see to our right is Turnip Patch Ridge. This is the ridge Mr. Coy 0. Yeatts told of hiking over in freezing weather while searching for his fox hound in the story he wrote, "WHY I NEVER MADE A FOX HUNTER", which was published in the April, 1984 issue of The Mountain Laurel. Between the highway and Turnip Patch, we can see a small rounded hill covered in meadow. A story circulates in these parts about a fellow who offered an unsuspecting neighbor 25# per row to "hoe out" the corn on this hill many years ago. The neighbor agreed and started hoeing on the first row early one morning and come nightfall, he was still hoe- A SPECIAL LETTER.... Dear Editor: This is our life's dream! I grew up in a small farming community in Kansas. We never locked a door. It was common...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1985

BACKROADS Continued from page 22. 7.6 (0.9) At this stop sign, we will turn right onto state road 758. On our left here is Hylton's Store, which is a small country store that has served this community for many years. 7.7 (0.1) Just after turning right onto 755, we will turn left onto state road 602. 8.7 (1.0) The picturesque mountain farm on our left here is typical of many that we will pass on this tour. 9.3 (0.6) At this stop sign, we will turn left onto state road 799. Folks from Meadows of Dan know this as the Willis Road and I assume that the folks from Willis know it as the Meadows of Dan Road. 9.4 (0.1) At this stop sign we will turn left onto state road 604 v toward Grace Brethern Church. 10.0 (0.6) Directly ahead is another view of "the Buffalo". 10.8 (0.8) Here we will turn left onto state road 727. Just after we turn, there will be a sign to our right indicating that this road ends in less than a mile. Once this road wound its way through the mountains and came out near M...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1985

Th y KSI «F JjJmJM heart of the blue ridge TAoiiniaM W«1 W"" A Copyright 1985 Laurel Publications Inc. DECEMBER ff * 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life PAGE 24 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. This month our BACKROAD TOUR will begin at the intersection of the Blue Ridge Parkway (Parkway mile post 177-7) and US Highway 58 in Meadows of Dan, Virginia. Our entire drive will cover a distance of 32.1 miles and will end, as usual, back at our point of beninning. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total distance we've traveled from our point of beginning to that point on our tour. The numbers in parentheses...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

JANUARY 1986 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life CALEB AND HENRY "THE STORYTELLERS" It was late of a cold, gray, overcast January evening when the two old men returned home. It had been foggy and misting rain, but now the sky looked like it was threatening snow. It was one of those winter days when people tried to do as little as possible with the exception of necessary outside chores. It was the perfect kind of day for hanging around the neighborhood store and swapping tall tales. People raised in this neck of the woods seemed to have an uncanny instinct for picking those get-togethers and everyone enjoyed them immensely. Story telling is an art passed down from one generation to another. Some places and towns have got so busy that it has almost died out, but on this January afternoon, Caleb and Henry were witness to some prime examples that story telling is alive and well and still living in the Blue Ridge. "When I got up this morning, I took one look at the sky and knew where I was ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1986 THE BEST SALMON LIE By: Roderick Wilkinson, Glasgow, Scotland ©COPYRIGHT 1986 In the spirit of proving that a fisherman (or woman) is the same the world over, we present this story for your reading enjoyment. If the mid-winter doldrums have got a hold of you, perhaps this will get you ready for the upcoming fishing season in spring. Susan Thigpen, Editor THE BEST SALMON LIE By: Roderick Wilkinson Glasgow, Scotland I thought I had met them all on a river-bank in my lifetime. And I thought I had heard every lie that could be told by armstretching whopper-tellers. But there' s always a new one. It was lunchtime and I sat down beside this man on the bank and offered him some of my coffee and a sandwich. He was no youngster - grey haired, grizzled and he had those delightful bright blue, innocent eyes of a born liar. And I knew right from the start I was going to get one of these hairy stories you get from those leather-faced, tweed-hatted anglers you...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

MY LIFE AT MEADOWS OF DAN I was about eight years old when I lived in that beautiful country. When I lived there, I never thought I could ever look back and say it was a good country to live in. We were very poor and times were hard. There were seven of us children - six girls and one boy. My father's name was Putnam Boyd. My mother was a Clifton before she married my father. My father sold eye glasses and looked after the people's eyes as best he could in that part of the country for a long time. Father and mother also made baskets and sold them for whatever they could get for them. We lived in an old house between Meadows of Dan and Maple Shade. There was no indoor plumbing. No out door plumbing either. Just a patch of woods out back. It was no fun to go out doors at night with wild animals roaming around. What a life. We moved there to take care of an old man's place and look after a bunch of cattle. The cattle were not there when we moved in, but later they brought them in by th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1986 CHARLIE, THE ONE-EYED EAR BITER By: Robert G. Back It was June 10, 1%8, and my two brothers and I had been waiting since noon for Papa to come home from the livestock sale he'd gone to just outside Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. The night before he'd said that if he could get a decent deal on a good horse, he'd buy it, and Ernie, Tommy and I couldn't wait to see whether or not he'd gotten that deal. At exactly 4:30 he came riding down the dusty road that ran past our house sitting astride a roan horse. He rode into the yard and reined to a halt. "How do ya like 'im, boys?" he asked, grinning from ear to ear. "Purtiest thing I ever seed, Papa!" I said "Me too!" ten year old Ernie agreed. "Me too!" eight year old Tommy echoed. Just as he was sliding off the horse's sweaty back, Mama came through the front screen door. She stepped onto the porch, looking sourly at Papa's newest acquisition. So as not to get caught in the cross-fire, my brothers and I got u...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

CHARLIE THE ONE EYED EAR BITER Continued from page 4. About fifty feet from the edge of the field, Papa got his feet tangled and fell flat on his face in the churning clay. The check lines were jerked out of his hands, and he went tumbling end over end. Through the red dust, all we could see were legs and arms flying in all directions. Charlie came to a skidding halt at the end of the field, then just as pretty as you please, he sat down on the harrow and looked back over his shoulder at Papa. My red-faced, furious father was advancing toward him with a huge clod of dirt in each hand. When Papa got within twenty feet of the resting horse, he cut loose with one of the dirt clods. Charlie ducked, however, and the dirt splattered against the side of the house with a board-rattl-ing KERCHUNK! The second clod barely flicked Charlie's ear and exploded against the trunk of the sycamore tree just inches below where Ernie was hanging on for dear life. "Git on ya feet, ya no-account rascal!" ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

I I- * aV, ' .■> \ v . Vt. t - PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1986 A BOYHOOD DAY'S HAPPENINGS Many years ago when I was a lad of six, this strange incident did happen to me. I lived in the country then on a farm. We had two dogs. One named Ring, because he had a white ring around his neck and was black everywhere else on his body; the other dog was named Old Friend, and I imagine he was thusly named because he was so friendly. Well, one Sunday evening on a clear calm day in early November, I heard the dogs bark in the distance. I asked my father if I could go and see what my dogs had. My father said, "You can go, but don't cross the fence. Stay on this side." So, I started out walking towards where I heard the dogs barking. They barked intermittently, first one dog, then the other dog. It was quite a ways off as their voices carried far on a calm day. After walking half of a mile or more, I came to where the dogs were, only about two rods across the fence. They had a cot...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

MEMORIES OF MEADOWS OF DAN Continued from page 3. was out on a labor case and would be gone for days. The whole family was upset. Finally Mama said maybe the old veterinarian might be able to help as he was good at looking after the cows and horses. Maybe he could come and help until we could do better. My dad went and brought him over and he spent the night looking after me. He set the bone that was broken and bandaged it up with some splints he made from old boards and scalded some old yard planting leaves and made poultices and put them on and left instructions for Mama to do this every day. In about a week it began to get better and heal. In a few months, it was doing fine. About a year after that, I fell out of a tree and broke the other leg in about the same place My dad found the same old veterinarian to come and fix it up. The bone was broke in much worse shape than the first time, but he went to work on it. After a long time it finally healed. From that day until this, I ha...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1986 MEMORIES OF WALTER ELIZABETH Across the road from my house stands a stately farmhouse. It was the home of two special people who had a great influence on my life, Walter and Elizabeth Hubbard. They were my neighbors for a number of years and I learned a lot from them. Walter was born January 29, 1895, the son of Henry Claiborne Hubbard and Mary Alice Ingram Hubbard. His wife, Mattie Elizabeth Agee Hubbard was the daughter of Eden William Agee and Annie Cock Agee. Elizabeth was born August 6, 1900. Both lived the greater portion of their life in the Meadows of Dan area of Virginia . Walter and Elizabeth lived on a large farm in the community of Mountain View. Their land produced several different crops like hay, corn, oats, buckwheat, beans and the cabbage that the mountains are famous for. Walter kept cows and sold milk to the Coble Milk Plant in Stuart, Virginia. After the milking chore was finished, he always took a pail of milk to the house fo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

WALTER & ELIZABETH Continued from page 8. chicken feed, she went to pick out a pretty print for something special. Once she had a white bag bordered with little blue trains. Elizabeth gave that to my son for a pillow case. It became his favorite bed linen. He slept on it until it came to pieces. Whenever I did the washing and that train pillow case wasn't dry at bed time, Ronald would say, "I want my Mrs. Hubbard pillow". There we can see that sometimes the simple little things can make a child happy and content. After all their children married and left home, Walter and Elizabeth spoiled my son. He loved them both very much. A visit to their home meant a piece of peppermint candy and a trip to the cellar for a juicy apple to munch on. Halloween meant going to Walter and Elizabeth's for Ronald. He knew there would be homemade pumpkin cookies and peanuts in the shell for him. I always loved to go visit Walter and Elizabeth in winter time, because I loved to sit around the...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAtIREi/ JANUARY,' 1986 POST OFFICES OF THE BLUE RIDGE ©COPYRIGHT 1986 I wrote to Washington, D.C. and got a letter back from Rita L. Moroney, Research Administrator, Historian. She said that she could not locate any information on mail delivery from Hillsville to Stuart, Virginia before the 1850's. She went on to say there was a Post Route Office by Wilt's Spur, Meadows of Dan, Laurel Fork, and Gladesboro to Hillsboro. Mail was probably carried along that route by mail wagon or stage coach. Wilt' s Spur road is now State Road 613, going by Bell Spur in Patrick County. When the Meadows of Dan Post Office was established Sept. 17, 1851, James Reynolds was the first Postmaster. The Post Office was kept in his home. He lived near Round Meadow Creek. The second Postmaster was Joseph Robertson, from July 7, 1857 til Oct. 30, 1857. It was in a store across the road from the Judge Shelor place, now owned by P.L. Shelor heirs. The next Postmasters were: Silas C. Dobson, Oct...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

{jittihu TjjmnjnnD Boy students constantly carved their initials onto the desk tops, making desk-top writing with paper an impossibility. We had to cushion our paper to make our writing legible because of all the ridges on the surface of the desk. Each desk accommodated two students. Tardiness posed no problem for the teacher on the first day of school; the student arrived early so that he would have ample time to choose his own "desk-mate" and not be obliged to sit out the school year beside an undesirable co-occupant. Despite these efforts, it was inevitable that spats would and did occur during the year. The offended student would then move abruptly to a more compatable location until differences could be resolved amiably. I encountered no such problem in the upper grades, because I had the good fortune to share a desk with cousin Arlee. We did a lot of silent communicating with our own set of facial expressions and grimaces, which, in turn, produced a lot of giggling. And we eng...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1986 The Mail Box Dear Sir: The other day we were in Hutchinson, Kansas shopping and buying some magazines when this lady came over and started visiting with us about your paper. Asked us for our address and 2 days later we received in the mail an order blank for us to subscribe to it. They really enjoy it and knew we would too. We really did appreciate them for getting us acquainted with you and them. Her name is Mrs. J.G. Butcher. They are really great people. We want to thank them for being so thoughtful of other people. Thanks again Mrs. Butcher, Mrs. Don Helsel Pratt, Kansas (Our thanks too, Mrs. Butcher. ...The Mountain Laurel) Dear Sirs, A friend of mine gave me a copy of "Mountain Laurel" last summer and as soon as I started reading it I saw it was right up my alley and subscribed for 3 years. And as I am an old codger of 83 years and have spent my entire life in the foothills of the Alleghenies, I want to give my 13 children a year's subscri...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

THE BLUE RIDGE DIGEST MEMORIES OF WINTER AN INTERVIEW- Living in the mountains of Kentucky along the south fork, commonly known as Springfork, of Quicksand Creek, a tributary of the Big Sandy River, Opal Lovely enjoyed the simplistic life of a farmer's daughter during the 1940'5. Untouched by most forms of industry, the people of Springfork lived in many ways a lifestyle similar to that of the first settlers of the area. Opal recalls winters in the mountains as "unyielding". The winter months were characterized by huge snow drifts, blizzards and snow storms that lasted for days on end. Winter arrived early, sometimes as soon as November, and lasted often until the beginning of April. Though cold, the winter months were a time of relative leisure as compared to the busy days of summer planting and fall harvesting. Entertainment was a matter of creative initiative for children during the winter months. Opal recalls, "Store bought games were unheard of. We invented our own games out of...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

PAGE B BLUE RIDGE DIGEST FRONT ROYAL VIRGINIA THE BEGINNING OF THE SKYLINE DRIVE 0 JUNCTION US 340 & SKYLINE DRIVE. From Front Royal 35 mi. east to Middleburg. Washington D.C. is 63 miles; 18 mi. southeast to Washington, Va.; 21 mi. north to Winchester, Va. 4._6 DICKY RIDGE VISITOR CENTER. Water, comfort stations, picnic grounds, exhibits, slide programs, sales publications . Alt. 1,940. 2J. HOGBACK OVERLOOK. Alt 3,385. View of 11 bends of Shenandoah River is visible on clear days. 24.1 ELKWALLOW. Picnic grounds, water, comfort station, fireplaces and picnic tables provided. EDINBURG, VIRGINIA POPT 766 SHENANDOAH VINEYARDS Shenandoah Valley's first winery, free toilrs. Easy access off 1-81. Woodstock or Edinburg exit. (703) 984—8699. 31.5 PANORAMA JUNCTION US 211. 9 mi. west to Luray, 7 mi. east to Sperryville, 24 mi. to New Market; 26 mi. to Culpepper. Alt. 2,304. SPERRYV I LLE / V/TT M ln the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains". On US 211, 7 miles east of Sky 1i ne ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

Virginia county maps are available for 260 each and requests should be addressed to: Virginia Dept. of HighwayTransport at ion 1221 E. Broad Street Richmond, VA 23219 North Carolina county maps are available for 250 each and requests should be addressed to: North Carolina Dept. of Transportation P.O. Box 25201 Raleigh, NC 27611 LYNCHBURG, VA. POP. 155,000 DAYS INN - From Peaks of Otter, take Route 43 south to 460E to 3320 Candler's Mtn. Rd. Exit 128 E. 131 rooms, outdoor pool, 24 hr. Dayßreak Restaurant. Adj. River Ridge Mall, convenient to shopping outlets, Natural Bridge 32 miles; Peaks of Otter 40 miles; Wintergreen 45 miles; Appomattox 25 miles. Phone direct 804/ 847-8655 or Toll-Free (800) 325-2525. BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY MILEPOSTOAT ROCKFISH GAP TO MILEPOSTIO6 AT U.S. 460 F WAYNLSBOROyM ) OS J .. . . ' f. < WOW ISH * r V" ■ ',i -J . \ BIUI oioci \j S«o( y I HUMPBACK ROCKS I ll l»l€ K \ o I 6»C€HVILLr| H(,HI I N \i ( 4< >) U. ]** ffcrAtm Ft/It \ I; ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1986

PAGE D BLUE RIDGE DIGEST DADDY RABBIT CAMPGROUND - Milepost 174, 4 miles west on 799 to 727 . Tent, trailers, dump station, water & electric hook up, metered LP gas, hot showers, laundry, fishing. (703) 789-4150. HUBBARD'S STORE - Gas, Picnic Supplies, Trout Fishing. \ mi. off Parkway on S.R. 758 near Rocky Knob Cabins. Pay only for catch. Come fish all day! (703) 593-3016. MEADOWS OF DAN, VA. ALT. 2,964 176.1 MABRY MILL, Meadows of Dan, Va. Visitor center, walking trail around old-time mountain industry exhibits. Water powered mill operating. 177.7 US 58 CROSSOVER. Hillsville is 22 mi. west. Stuart, Martinsville, Danville to East. THE COUNTRY WHALE - Jet. 58/Pkwy. Quality crafts; woodwork, baskets, pottery, candles, baby gifts, toys, dolls, fine quilts. Homespun bakery; wholesome goodies & breads. Pantry; dried fruit-nuts, apple butter, honey, sorghum, ice cream. Open Daily April-Dec. VISA/MC (703) 952-2116. BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY FROM MILE POST 106 AT U.S. 460 ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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