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Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

June 1992 10 REGISTERED ANGUS cows bred with calves, also 2 buls, $1,000 each. Frank Stone, 804-798-6477/288-9000. WANTED—Crippled or down cows, steers or buls. Rick Lewis, 804-352-5846 or 352-7352. ANGUS—'Vfearling registered bulls. EPD's & Pedigree awaiable. Sired by R & J Spade 1204, Premier Independence, Whitehal Pulsar & PS Sasquatch 904. Reasonably priced. Cal Ken Whitkjck, manager, 804-633-5931; Trent Boleman, herdsman, 804-633-9823 or Holly Hill Farm Corp., 804-633-7527. SIMMENTAL BULL. Colt son, red & polled, easy calfer, service age. $1,000. 804-265-8600. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN service age buls. Also open heifers. 703-825-0590. BULLS—B registered Angus W1 rent or sel. 804-556-4212. Grapendge Farm, Goochland 23063. WANTED—farm or pasture for beef cattle. Spotsylvania or Orange County, 703-399-1208 WANTED—farm or pasture for beef cattle. Culpeper or Madison County, 703-399-1208. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD buls, 18 months. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

Vol. 51, No. 5 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS June 1992 I H *IH Wm^ fl - (jft^S _ .;■-£- p^jr — j I * \HHP f'-1 ' £-g s * i ~' I "'' +'"^'- 3 ? j -v*!w» "* s Bruno, the watch dog, figures he might as wel rest. That -i , -- 1 - ** * rS'lSr basebal bat won't be picked up for fun urrtl al the chores * -• are done at the Mx Dairy In Appomattox County. In ( <v a?- *' observation of National Dairy Month, Extension Agent "H&Jlfife#''- : , HI llLiHnn tnl n« ■ nn n rl n ■ mi * * - nnnalrlmr * * *- ' ,; .. ■ viWißy w« WoiKXi 13NBS nsfIOBTS n6T6 ®o consicicr now rresn, nutritious, safe ml( gets to the table. (Phoio by iwhy s sixkvtan)

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

I PTn j Vol. 51, No. 6 Conservation compliance plans being clarified The Soil Conservation Service is updating the narrative portion of some conservation compliance plans that were developed by farmers as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. "About 40,000 such plans were originally developed from 1987 through 1991," stated George Norris, state conservationist. "By completing the plans in such a short time period so that farmers would maintain eligibility for USDA programs, the quality of some plans suffered." "We are clarifying the text so tbat farmers will understand exactly what practices are to be installed and when" —George Norris, state conservationist "Vfc are clarifying the text so that farmers will understand exactly what practices are to be installed and when," said Norris. When the process is complete, the text of the farmer's plan will be clearly understood by both the farmer and the Soil Conservation Service personnel, he said. Most of the changes in the text are for clarificatio...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

Virginians can be thankful for agriculture's bounty Virginia is truly a diverse state in many ways. From its ocean beaches and tidal rivers, to its rugged valleys; from quiet rural settings to the bustling activity of Washington suburbs, the Old Dominion offers a little of everything. So too does its agriculture. With planting season in full force for many of our commodities, I thought this would be an appropriate time to profile the state's agricultural sector and reflect on its successes. Though not a large farming state like those in the Midwest, Virginia does raise significant amounts of tobacco, soybeans, turkeys, chickens, beef cows, dairy cows, hogs, peanuts, forestry products and nursery stock. It also produces varying amounts of corn for grain and silage, hay, potatoes, fresh market tomatoes, wheat, horses, eggs, sheep and lambs, and apples. Smaller amounts of honey bees, barley, cotton, sweet corn, sweet potatoes, rye, peaches, broccoli, cabbages, cherries, cucumbers, goat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

July 1992 July 10: Animal Industry Day, Virginia' Tech. Contact Charlie Stott, 703-231-5863. July 11-12: Eastern Summer Quarterhorse Sale and Virginia Quarterhorse Association meeting, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. 703-463-4300. July 11-12: Farm Machinery Safety and Extrication Program, Vffestmoreland County. Sponsored by the Virginia Farm Buieau Mutual Insurance Co. Contact F.F. Chandler Jr., 804-493-8182. July 11-13: Virginia Equipment Dealers Association summer conference, Ramada Towers Hotel, Virginia Beach. 804-379-2099. July 13: Virginia Blackberry and Blueberry Field Day, Southern Piedmont Agricultural Experiment Station, Blackstone. Contact Dr. Herbert Stiles, 804-292-5331. July 13-23: Regional Policy Development meetings, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Contact Alex Hamilton, 804-225-7531. July 13-16: 4-H Citizenship-Virginia Heritage Focus, Virginia State University, Petersburg. 703-231-6371. July 14-18: Rural Retreat Fair. Contact Wayne Fulton, 703-686-5463- July 14:...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

Spot checks being made for conservation plans U.S. DEPARTMENT OF NUMBER OF TRACTS Conservation video features Virginia farmer A Virginia farmer, Bruce Johnson of Wsst Point, is featured in a new nationwide videotape that answers farmers' questions about highly erodible land, conservation plans and compliance with federal guidelines. Johnson of West Point is one of four growers from the major row-crop regions of the nation who talk on the 15-minute film with Soil Conservation Service Chief Bill Richards. The other farmers asking regional and national questions on the tape are Randy Cruise of Nebraska, Mark Lanning of Wyoming and Mike Tkte of Alabama. In the film, "Straight Talk About Your Conservation Plan," Richards tackles issues like flexibility, changing plans, working with local SCS conservationists and understanding the appeal system. The videotape will be available at Soil Conservation Service offices. The National Corn Growers Association, the American Soybean Association and...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

July 1992 Age-weighted profit sharing plans add flexibility (Continued from Page 2) require that the contributions be allocated on the basis of compensation, regardless of the age of the employees. An age-weighted profit sharing plan combines the best features of both a profit sharing plan and a target benefit plan. First, an age-based profit sharing plan can increase or decrease contributions each year depending on the cash flow of the business or even forego contributing if the employer has had a bad year. Second, like a defined benefit plan, an age-weighted profit sharing plan permits larger contributions to the older employees or, in the alternative, ageweighting the plan reduces the amount the employer must contribute for the younger employees in order to reach its desired goal for its contribution to the older employees. On the other hand, a profit sharing plan will not allow the employer to deduct from its taxes as a contribution to the plan an amount exceeding 15 percent of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

Summer fruits make getting your just desserts healthy Dessert —most people would agree it's the best part of the meal. It's the course worth saving room for, and the treat that still prompts children the world over to finish their vegetables. With the focus on eating lighter, dessert has gone by the wayside in many homes. Traditional desserts such as cakes, pies and brownies are rather high in sugar and fat, but can still be eaten on occasion. For desserts that can be enjoyed anytime, turn to the sweet flavor I Jeanine M. Sherry, M.S..R.D. I President, NewWelness Inc. mer fruits. Either alone, or in combination with low-fat ingredients such as yogurt, angel food cake, or light whipped toppings, fruits can be the nutritious, delicious finale to any summer meal. Cantaloupe, Crenshaw, honeydew and watermelon are sweet, juicy and flavorful right off the vine Adding a scoop of sorbet or sherbet, marinating in orange juice or pineapple juice, or topping with a splash of orange or raspberr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

July 1992 You can watch your cholesterol and enjoy vacation dining Most Americans eat out at least once a week, and some eat out every day. With vacation time, people will be eating out one, two or maybe three meals a day. riSWriey W. Walton Extension agent I home economist \ SHARING 53NCimj4riEZi I wWiSHRLEY and sometimes some browsing in the fast food quick-to-pickup kinds of places. Many fast food restaurants now have food that is broiled and with the sauces omitted when requested. Also, some of the fast food places will hold such condiments as mayonnaise, ketchup and tartar sauce. Today many restaurants are catering to the health requests of their patrons. Whether you are traveling or eating out on vacation, keep the following guidelines in mind: • Eat fewer foods high in saturated fats • Eat fewer high fat foods. • Replace part of your saturated fat with unsaturated fat • Eat fewer high cholesterol foods. • Choose foods high in complex carbohydrates (starch and fiber) When choo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

Nelson, Rockingham, Nottoway, Eastern Shore dispose old chemicals ~HI fl wt Jj U t *****JLsJBK 9j p*" H II ■ J—L. I Clockwise from above: Don Deloren of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services moves bagged material for cisposal. Nelson County Extension Agent David Fiske (left) and orchardist Bennett Saunders survey the pesticides they reacfied for cßsposal. Efizabeth Cook of CteanHarbors Cos. prepares to seal a can. Shed displays proper warning sign. Work area is restricted. When Bennett Saunders heard that the Department of Agrieulture and Consumer Services had selected Nelson County for a pesticide disposal project in 1992, he knew Saunders Bixw. Inc. would want to participate. Apple orchardists like Saunders usually have several sheds where they store and mix chemicals for their spray trucks. Often the>' store the unused pesticides in the sheds for later use, but if they are not used, the}' eventually go out-of-date. "They- have a way of accumulati...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

July 1992 Ginseng pays, but takes its time and the grower's Wr JHI I f & JBBF "'^S| a«lLsi£r ' V / •" A green cluster of berries in the center of the plant win redden later this summer. By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Edtor ORANGE —Doug V. Peregoy took a savoring sip of iced Korean ginseng tea and smiled. "You can make money in ginseng, that's true. The best way is to own a piece of woodland, live on it, plant your ginseng as close to your house as you can—and keep some bad dogs," he said. Peregoy has the growling dogs, but his small backyard patches of transplanted and cultivated ginseng in the town of Orange aren't making him rich. He has pampered and pondered ginseng here for 14 years—as long as he's made a living as a design engineer. It's a fascinating family project to him and his wife, Carolyn, and their 17-year-old son, Scott. Why the dogs? "Believe you me, if you don't have some mechanism in place to protect the roots, they will be stolen," said Peregoy,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

lech survey shows Virginia BLACKSBURG—The vast majority of Virginians think Virginia is a good or excellent place to live, according to a survey done at Virginia Tech. Eighty-six percent of Virginia s citizens like their home state, according to the "Quality of Life in Virginia: 1992" report done as a public service by Virginia Tech's Center for Survey Research, with support from the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station and the college of arts and sciences. For the March poll, 542 randomly selected adults throughout the commonwealth were interviewed by telephone. The poll has a sampling error of plus or minus 4.3 percentage points. "Consistent with the expression of overall satisfaction with the state," said Farmers can't wait to be asked for t' s Farm Bureau 1 • 1 WOMEN Helen Neese State Women Chairman The U.S. Department of Agriculture's 11th Annual Agriculture in the Classroom Conference at Orlando, June 6-9, was enlightening. I am continually amazed at the amount of activity...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

July 1992 Healthcare Coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Does Your Policy Provide? $5,000,0000 Medical Coverage? Our plan provides up to $5,000,000 in lifetime benefits for covered services. An Annual Out of Pocket Limit The Maximum you will personally pay toward covered services in any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, (for option I) Dental Coverage Included Coverage for restorative and preventative dentistry. Prescription Drug Card Just show your card at participating pharmacies for immediate coverage. Supplemental Accident Benefits Additional benefits paid for accidental injury. Low Rates A wide range of options to meet your budget needs. Entry Age Rating Your rates wouldn't go up just because you become older. 92 Service Offices To provide you personal service. Poficy Form 110098 If your current healthcare policy doesn't provide you all of these benefits at our low rate, or if you don't have medical coverage and are not already eligible for Blue Cro...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

v A •'.'K"% ... *. v * V - ; k *<T S*j m- ' " ' <• Vi irri *HP i *■ • ' r ■ '"■"■■ Last year's crop of ye Row flowering canola, or rapeseed, attracted camera bugs on a Goochland County farm. While healthy canola oil is popular, farmers want crushing plants to move to Virginia. (F* photo) One-quarter of Virginia FmHA accounts delinquent RICHMOND —After more than a year of delays, the Farmers Home Administration has mailed servicing notices to 497 Virginia borrowers to warn their loans are in trouble. Of the 1,937 customers the FmHA has in Virginia, 25 percent are delinquent. While that percentage is high, most farmers should have little trouble bringing their accounts up to date, according to Lloyd A. Jones, Virginia FmHA director. "We feel comfortable we'll be able to salvage most of these people," Jones said. Until recently, the FmHA was restricted from most foreclosure and loan restructuring activities due to a lack of appropriate regulations. The agency anno...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

July 1992 Farm Bureau provides producers a guide to labor laws This special section, prepared by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation public affairs department, is intended to provide a reference to the major provisions of the many state and federal regulations and laws (as of Feb. 1, 1992) which affect farm employers and employees. This guide does not substitute for specific advice from the state or federal agencies responsible for regulations, attorneys or other experts in the field of agriculture labor laws. Please note that when a federal law is more stringent than a state law the federal law prevails. Likewise, the state law prevails if it is more stringent. Absence of a state law does not excuse compliance with the federal law. Therefore, employers should check both federal and state laws or regulations. The many and complex regulations affecting farm labor change each year. Therefore, agriculture employers need to be aware of the current laws. Remember the best protection that...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

Many labor law changes affect producer members (Continued from page 13) 1. Farm operators who employ only their own farm family members. 2. Farm operations employing 10 or fewer employees during the previous 12 months and do not maintain a migrant labor camp. Employers of 11 or more workers must: • Inform employees of safety regulations and display posters in a conspicuous place or places where notices to employees are customarily posted. • Report within 48 hours any accident which is fatal to one or more employees or which results in hospitalization of five or more employees by telephone or in writing to the nearest OSHA Area office. • Maintain up-to-date records of all occupational injuries and illnesses. • Display the "Summary of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses," OSHA Form 200 in a conspicuous place where employees will see it by Feb. 1. • Ensure the ready availability of medical persons for advice and consultation on matters of work place health. • Comply with the specific s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

July 1992 REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS, age 19 mos. to 18 mos. Pine Drive Background. $600 to $1,000. Rodamachpa Farm, AmeSa, VA. 804-561-2490. GELBVIEH BULL—black, 15 months, high EDP's, $1200. Call Bill Walker, 703-576-3218. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN bulls Service age. Also open and bred heifers. THREE BIG BEAUTIFUL, registered Angus bred heifers. Performance breeding. $950 each. PICK YOUR next herd, sire young and save money. Top performance breeding. $650 each. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD bulls, 18 months. Ph: 645-9193. Crewe, VA. ANGUS—\fearing registered buls. EPD'S & pedigree available. Sired by R & J Spade 1204, Premier Independence, Whitehall Pulsar & PS Sasquatch 904. Reasonably priced. Cal Ken Whit Jock, manager, 804-633-5931; Trent Boleman, herdsman, 804-633-9823 or Holy Hi Farm Corp, 804-633-7527. TENN. WALKING HORSES, registered well broke and ready for the trails. 703-: WANTED—2 quiet trail horses. Good home. Call 804-580-6922. Reasonabl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1992

Farm Bureau jr*^ cl .." »f" in ''MBtoa^ifcgt 1 -« *^:mtwmmmmmmmtmmmmmmmmm.^m i i Hi. H< * ■ BMKfcl i;^yWHßi m (t , ■... ji^k vl "That's easy. The service. If you have a claim, Farm Bureau works hard to help you get back on the road fast. In fact, thousands of drivers on our highways enjoy the good service of Farm Bureau Auto Insurance. Maybe that's why they say 'Helping you is what we do best' ." Howdy, partner Sausage Idng Jhnmy Dean (left) gave Virginia Fterm Bureau President C. Wayne Astmwrfi« hearty welcome to a racapion held In tie country mueic star's honor May 21 by Wflrta Cmnntaotoner ct Agtaftae Cirilon V. Timer. The Ttaaa native and wWe, Donna Meade Dean, a atogarhareeif who yaw i? In 3andeton,haathlßtortcCliaffln Bluff, about aawsn mlea east of Richmond on the James rawer. Growing up near Ptafawiew, Ifexas cfciring the Pepreeslon, Dean learned to play pleno, liamwnloa and accottlan between chopping cotton, running driving tractors, balng hay, cleaning chicken h...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

S | fen £ f| mH 1 I 1 I h I B IE wKr 4k Hi HHR IK HI REHI ■■ ■ SB JB ■ 198 ■HH li " *3 p» r 4? |H ?v p§M? £■ Bf/ ■ ■ n % WBF ■ Bp" k:4 H J ■ HH 188 mm HHmH (2m BH s9HBS Jjg , - *F BHi «■§ ■>„,. . ■HHHi R9h y '• •"■'. • ~ - .?•:•><•'•'*•• '-■jM v- . v»j&v JBi ■ < ~.. *^^HgBH BS> JL__ J _____^__^_^^_^— Vol. 51, No. 7 No quick fix seen for Russian farmers By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Ector RICHMOND —While many farmers are poised to take advantage of export opportunities abroad, they should exercise extreme caution before investing in Russian business ventures, say three Virginia Firm Bureau Federation leaders who visited there June 16-29. Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Clinton Hirner and 11 other state farm leaders toured four Russian cities, working farms and agricultural facilities. "Many of the older agriculture officials tell us it probably would take... three generations before'' Russians adapt to free ent...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1992

President's visits help the press understand farmers Each summer, I spend several days visiting with media representatives around the state in an effort to cultivate a better working relationship with those who help shape public opinion. Our goal each year is to create for news persons a better understanding of agricultural issues, while we learn more about their needs as well. The annual visits have proven to be productive. More stories are written and produced about farming, the press develops a heightened awareness of agriculture's importance and we make new friends in readers. This year; our communications director and I visited reporters and editors in Hampton Roads and on the Eastern Shore. We carried with us several pressing agricultural issues Farm Bureau is working on. But we also left the floor open for questions about any agricultural topic. From weekly and daily newspaper writers and editors to radio and television news reporters, we received varying degrees of interest,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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