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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. Mammoth Clover.—Mr. M. Keller, of Los Angeles, has sent to the Alia office two fine bunches of burr clover, each of which is four and a half feet in length. Monster Owl.—An owl said to measure 21 % inches from the point of his beak to the end of his tail, and 4 feet 5 inches from tip to tip of his wings, was recently taken to the Sonoma Republican office. He was killed on Suisun creek, and is claimed to be a veritable Virginia owl. A Queer Chick. —At the dairy ranch of Messrs. S. Hough & Son, near the head of Sun Pablo Creek, one of a brood of chicks hatched out a few days since was found to have three eyes, two in the usual position, and one in the center of the forehead, two bills, and other double or triple organs. Mr. H. has bottled it up in alcohol for the ins2>ection of the curious. A QuEEit Pit. —The Oakland Transcript says that a black and tan slut, belonging to Henry Brown, on Telegraph road gave birth to a five-legged ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FARM-HOUSE CHAT—NO. 2. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

FARM-HOUSE CHAT—NO. 2. In an odd number of Hearth and Home, I read with much interest, Mrs. Kate Hunnibee's Diary and Report of the Housekeeper's Club. Their discussion was to be "Plansfor Kitchens;" and that has set me to thinking. Did they talk of city kitchens, village kitchens or farm kitchens'? Doubtless they ventilated them all most thoroughly—compared the merits of all sorts and sizes of this desirable article and "run up" several "loves of kitchens" with a skill and speed familiar only to practiced builders of air castles. How well I remember my first astonished introduction to a city basementkitchen. How close, and crowded, and dingy it seemed in contrast with the one in which I had my "bringing up"—the wide and cheerful farm kitohen, whose floor of white maple was so sensitive as to spotlessness that the least movement of a chair was sure to "make its mark." The purity of that floor WM my mother's pet hobby, and afforded for herself and daughters a task almost as endless a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Irrepressible Rodent. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

Our Irrepressible Rodent. The foresight and industry of the ant, the exactitude and care of the bee, and the faithfulness and docility of the dog, have long been proverbial. But who, hitherto, has been found to celebrate, in verse or prose, the sagacity and engineering skill of California's pioneer miner—the Gopher? For how many ages prior to our golddigging era has he tunneled and drifted, carried dirt, and " made his pile." How skillfully all his operations are performed; how regular and smooth the interior of his habitation; with what energy and diligence he applies himself to his daily labor. Surely we may dole out to him some measure of that respect which all men intuitively, though perhaps grudgingly, yield to real workers. In npiny ways he is worthy of some slight notice, but it must be allowed that his chief claim to attention is the amount of mischief to which he must plead " guilty." So great, in fact, is his ability to work wreck and ruin, that it might be instructive if ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Chemistry and its Applications. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

Chemistry and its Applications. [Prof. Ezha 3. Cabu before the Mechanic Akts College, Mechanic*' Inntituto Hall, 8. F. Reported expressly for the Prehh.] Phosphorus—lt Exists in Man. Lect. V. Mar. 18. —Phosphorus, the name signifies bearer of light, was first discovered in 1672. It is a substance which is found quite largely in Nature under certain conditions. It exists in the bodies of animals, especially in the bones, about one-half of which is phosphate of lime and nearly one-half is what is called gelatine. I have here a bone out of which the phosphate has been taken, leaving the gelatine, and you see that I can twist and bend it and even tie it up in a knot. The proportion of the phosphate and of gelatine is not the same, however, in all animals nor even in the same animal at all ages. When young, there is more gelatine and less phosphate of lime, and when old, less gelatine and more phosphate, relatively, in the bones of animals. This explains the reason why a child's bones wi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Artificial Stone Making in San Francisco. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

Artificial Stone Making in San Francisco. We visited the Pacific Stone Company's works, on Turk and Larkin streets, last week, and found that they had twenty men busily employed and were turning out daily two tons of stone, chiefly for ornamental work. This shows that the merits of their manufactured article is being appreciated here. We have previously described fully the method of manufacturing the Eansome stone, and have spoken of its excellent qualities, qualities wbioh have been proved by the severest tests and are attested by the highest authorities. The stone withstands the effects of heat and cold, moisture and dry ness, and other climatic influences. It is a perfect imitation of natural sandstone, and is, in fact, a stone, not plaster, nor concrete. It can be shaped after any design, however intricate, at a comparatively low cost, and the more complicated the design, the less the expense compared with that of natural rock. We see that the company are making colored stones, ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AN ULCER CURED BY A DOG. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

AN ULCER CURED BY A DOG. James M. Hole. M. D., writes as follows to editor of the Herald of Health: —Some time in the month of February, 1864, I was called to see an elderly man —say 60 to 65 years of age. On entering he said: "Doctor, here is a very sore arm for you; I have had many doctors to treat me, but here it is. By this time he had the bandage removed from it, and just at that moment a large dog got tip and walked over to his master, as he held the arm exposed, tilled with bloody, pus-looking stuff —a bad looking ulcer indeed. The dog offered to lick it, but he ordered him away. I said: "Let him lick it off, if he will; I can see it better." "Here, Watch!" The dog walked up, went to work and licked it clean and nice from the shoulder to the wrist. The man seemed to experience considerable pain, but I kept his attention by getting an explanation of how long the sore had been there, the cause, etc. When the dog had finished, he retired to his resting-place on the rug in the ro...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. That's a fine yoiing farmer from Medoc, Southern France, whom we have engaged to overlook our ranch. He is knitting and farming at the same time. How this is possible will be ascertained by reading the accompanying article. We should like to engage a few more young people for similar situations; salary no consideration but a handsome face is necessary; ladies preferred; work easy; position elevated, —a fine opening. The young man, as can be seen, has a pleasant place, surrounded by fields of Wheat and of Ramie. After our farmer has been scrutinized to the satisfaction of our friends, they will please take the usual glance at the library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress, and read the Notes from Stanislaus and Calaveras counties. They will undoubtedly be pleased to examine the new Proof-Galley Rack, and to visit our anatomical cabinet where is to be seen the Famous Calaveras Skull. By walking to our lawn, they can see what has been done for the Cultivation of Gra...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

To Correspondents.—We are literally flooded with communications, many of which we shall have to condense, and some we shall probably have to decline for want of room in our crowded columns. ' 'Badger" sends us an account of a summer visit to Devil's Lake, as a counterpart to his winter visit already published. Mr. T. Hart. Agent, has furnished us some facts from his experience in tree culture in California. We have the "History of a Hat" for the juveniles from a little 13-year-old girl. We have also received an interesting letter, describing a new "Fire Escape" from a lady, and some hints about making bread from another lady. The report of the "Santa Cruz Farmers' Club" comes to hand just as we are going to press.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SILK CULTURE IN UTAH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

SILK CULTURE IN UTAH. The people in this Territory are becoming fully alive to the importance of the general introduction of silk culture as one of the best and most profitable industries of the country. Brighain Young is already quite an extensive producer of silk. Other parties are also engagel in the business, and all seem to have been uniformly sucessful. A gentleman writing from Spanish Fork, in that Territory, says:— "I have propagated the same worms for four years, and every worm spins. I have never seen any symptoms of disease among them." We have received a sample of the cocoons raised by him, and should pronounce them of a good quality. The variety of cocoons cultivated is the same as is mostly cultivated in Asia Minor. The cocoon is of an oval or egg shape, pointed at both ends. There is much less gum or glue in this cocoon than in that of the French and most of the Japanese varieties, and hence the silk is more easily wound off or reeled. Another correspondent from Salt ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOW TO PROPAGATE THE OSAGE ORANGE FROM SEED. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

HOW TO PROPAGATE THE OSAGE ORANGE FROM SEED. Prepare the ground thoroughly by plowing or spading and pulverize it finely with harrow or rake. To sprout the seed, put it in a vessel and cover with warm, not hot, water. Keep the vessel in a warm place, and change the water once a day. Let the seed soak from five to ten days, after which pour off the water and cover the vessel with a damp cloth. Keep in a warm room and stir the seed occasionally; in about one week more they will begin to sprout and are ready for planting. There are a little over eleven thousand seeds in a quart, and it is safe to calculate that a quart will produce five thousand plants, if it is properly managed. The seed should be planted, in this State, in March or April, according to the season, and in drills eighteen or twenty inches apart, with twelve good seeds to the foot in the drills. If the season should prove very dry, and the seed are not on Vm-y moist soil, they will want some irrigations but if on sandy a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. Poultry Books. — Geyelin's Poultry Breeding, published by Orange Judd '& Co., of New York, is perhaps as good as any; but for the further information of our correspondent "we would say that no less than three new poultry books are in preparation. One by Lockwood & Co., of Hartford, Connecticut; one by J. S. Bester, of same city; one under the auspices of the publisher of the Mural New Yorker. How to Get Rtd op Ants. —We know of no better way than to saturate a sponge in water made as sweet as possible with sugar,—catch and scald them. A little coal oil poured into their nest, if you can find it, will pretty effectually close them out. To Get lliv of Lice on Chickens.— Sprinkle a little snuff under their wings and on other portions of their bodies—not too much. Or put it freely in their dusting places. Tobacco stems or leaf tobacco pounded up will take the place of snuff. To keep rid of the vermin, see that the Roosts and nests are k...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
RAISIN, PRUNE, ORANGE CULTURE, ETC. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

RAISIN, PRUNE, ORANGE CULTURE, ETC. A subscriber from San Jose writes us as follows: "Some gentleman of means at the East, who intend to come to California during the year to make permanent homes, have employed me to start, for them, a large number of raisin grapes, prunes, oranges, almonds and English walnuts. They have not as yet fully determined where they will locate, though I presume they intend going to the southern portion of the State. I think, however, they would prefer a location in some of the ]3ay counties, or foot-hills of the Sierras in the central portion of the State, provided they could find a climate and soil adapted to raising and curing such fruits and nuts as I have named. I have great faith in your judgment regarding these matters, and would like to have your opinion as to the very best place in the State to engage in this business. Also if there are not some places in the central counties, where most or all of these fruits could be raised and cured, as a safe ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POULTRY NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

POULTRY NOTES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CHOICE POULTRY YARDS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

CHOICE POULTRY YARDS. Last week we spent an "hour viewing the fine specimens of thoroughbred fowls in the yards of Mr. Geo. B. Bayley, on the corner of 16th and Castro streets, in our neighboring city of Oakland. Mr. B. has five coops of imported light brahmas, all of which are pure blooded and in fine condition. In one of these we find a trio obtained from Win. Simpson, Jr., of West Farms, Treasurer of the N. Y. State Poultry Association. The cock, nine months old, weighs twelve pounds; and one of the hens ten pounds. Their period of growth being two years, we must rate this couple as decidedly promising chicks. The young broods grow so rapidly that the feathers do not keep pace with their bones and flesh, consequently they appear about the feeding coops in a semi-nude condition. The brahma hens are in the first class as layers, and as setters, and tender mothers. They are also easily broken of settingtwo or three days of solitary confinement effectually curing them. " Dickens," an...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

Crops on Russian River. —A correspondent of the Russian River Flag, writing from Healdsburg says: "My own opinion, based upon present appearances, is that we shall have a grain crop, next year, 50 per cent, greater than ever before raised in this valley. 'Jhe peach trees, in various parts of the State, present a beautiful sight at this time the pinkish tint of their blossoms contrasting beautifully with the deep green of the landscape.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
JOHN EUSTACE, OR THE TRIUMPH OF PERSEVERANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 25 March 1871

JOHN EUSTACE, OR THE TRIUMPH OF PERSEVERANCE. BY NELL VAN. [Written for the Pbess.] I had been teaching district school in the small New England village of N—, upwards of a year, when one morning a little stranger boy was led into the schoolroom by one of the children. He was sitting by the roadside crying, and upon questioning him, I found the little fellow to be quite an intelligent lad of nine years, who had no parents, and had run away from an old woman, in a neighboring town, with whom he had been living, and by whom he had been cruelly beaten for some trivial offense. He had somewhere picked up a leaf from an oid spelling book, from which he had managed to learn many of his letters. His name he said was Johnny Eustace, and he had no recollection of any other home than the one he had left where he had been so unkindly dealt with. He said he wanted to learn to read, but she would not teach him, and so anxious was he to go to school that he said if I would only allow him to come ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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