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Title: Dawn, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,014 items from Dawn, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

.WE PALING à CO., LTMITI 344 GEORGE1 STREET, SYDNEY. -Sole Agents for THE ESTEY ORGAN, Tie best and cheapest Organ procorabîe. PIANOS 3BY ALL TliK 03BS$RJ? mAKER?*. PAYMENT " .Illustrated Cat^oguea «»4 prices post fre« aa application,. -- - ,< V.-' !{ :£V.-.Vir /. ... ; - rJ.^\\ rv-' ' " : ?

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Notice of Removal. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

Notice of Removal. After this date 'The Dawn" will be printed and published at 402 George street, Sydney.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HINTS. A NEWSPAPER PARAGRAPHER SAYS [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

HINTS. A NEWSPAPER PARAGRAPHER SAYS That warm borax water will remove dand ruff. That grained wood should be washed with cold tea. That cayenne pepper blown into the cracks where ants congregate will drive them away. That whole cloves are now used to extermin . ate moths, and to be better for that purpose than either tobacco, camphor, or cedar shavings. To PREVKNT METALS FROM RUSTING. - Melt together three parts of lard and one part resin in powder. A very thin coating, applied with a brush, will preserve stoves a id grates from rusting during summer, even in damp situations. For this purpose, a portion of black lead may be mixed with the lard. The effect is equally good on copper, brass, steel, etc. A FINE lustrous polish for delicate cabinet work can be made as follows : Half-pint of linseed oil, half-pint of old ale, the whixe of an egg and one ounce of muriatic acid. Shake well before using. A little to be applied to the face of a soft linen pad, and lightly rubbed for a minute ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

WORTH NOTING. THE CELEBRATED ORIENT CLOTHING, IS THE CHEAPEST * MOST ECONOMICAL OBTAINABLE IN THE COLONIES FOR BOYS AND YOUTH'S SCHOOL AND BEST WEAR All Parents should try the ORIENT CLOTHING for their Boys. The Mater ials are Reliable and Properly Shrunk. The work is DURABLE and the Shapes fit A GOURA TE LY and comfortably The Orient Clothing always gives satisfaction. DAVID JONES & CO., Opposite the General Post Office, GEORGE STREET SYDNEY, Patterns and directions for self-measurement sent free on application.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Extravagant Economies. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

4 Extravagant Economies. MANY women who are extremely frugal in other things seem to have no idea of the value of time. Of their failures in this direction a writer in the Christian Register gives a few examples ; '' Do you not know many homes where the supply of cooking utensils is so unnecessarily limited thet a good deal of time is daily wasted and much extra labor expended in preparing the meals, by having to wash one saucepan in which to cook a second dish that could as well have been cooked with the same fire, and weitched at the same time as the first ? Or a towel must do duty as a strainer or colander, no account being made of the time required to wash the towel nor of its becoming worn and stained ? Or a silver spojn is used to stir or lift food for the lack of iron or wooden ones ? Why not afford such kettles and pansas are really needed for advan tageous cooking and ' save ' in some other department ? How often does a mother feel compelled to stand sentinel over three sau...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

BIRTHDAY CARDS. DO YOU WANT BIRTHDAY CARDS to send your friends? If so, send for "The Dawn" Beautiful Shilling Packet. The above will be sent as a premium to anyone securing one new subscriber to "The Dawn" Address, L. WYNN, 402 George street, Sydney A Nice Present for Girls. Two Choice Japanese Silk Handkerchiefs in box, sent post free for twelve penny stamps. Any of our readers obtaining Ons New Subscriber to " The Dawn " 3/- per annum, can secure this nice present as a premium. DO YOÜ WANT POCKET MONEY. ? ANY boy or girl who is willing to work can readily secure a supply of pocket money by introducing "The Dawn" The Australian Woman's Journal, to the residents of the district in which they live. Tht Dawn is a domestic journal which should be on the table of every household in Australia. It is Edited, Printed, and published by Women, and contains articles specially written by women for women. The subscription is 3/ per annum payable in advance. To any boy or girl obtaining new sub...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DROLL THINGS SAID BY CHILDREN A PAIR OF KID GLOVES [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

P^OLL THINGS SAID BY J^HILDREN A PAIR OF KID GLOVES is offered each month to the contributor of the best Original Droll Thing said by a child. Anecdotes for next month's competition to be sent in by the 22nd. inst. The prize this month is awarded to the contributor of the first related anecdote hereunder. Mamma at Zoo to Edie, (aged 6) " Hush ! the 3 now, don't cry, did the nasty Emu bite you ? " "Boo, hoo ! no !" said Edie. "Then what are you crying for ?" asked her mother. "He opened his mouth and swallowed at me, boo, hoo." Arthur (aged 5) on a visit, has been running, shouting and vociperating for the purpose of driving out some cows which had entered the house paddock. Mrs. Trutts. " So dear, you have been driving the cows out ? " Arthur. Yes, and one nearly kicked ! " Alice, (aged 5) on being told God made the world in six days, asked mamma, "How is it if God was strong enough to nÄcthis great world in six days. He didn't make me a big lady to be able to work like you and not ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

EMPIRE COMPANY'S RENOWNED ?i Amber Meal As a Porridge, ^P"" "BREAKFAST COMING!" ' ROBERT HARPER & Co. Wuolesale Agents, York St. Sydney.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JELLIES. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

JELLIES. .á* B* ISABEL E. WALLACH. -MAM-WVW CONDUCTED in the old-fashioned way, jelly making is undoubtedly a hot and tiresome task, but nowadays, by employing modern utensils, one can lighten both the labor and the discomfort attendant upon the work without in any way impairing its success. The jelly press, of almost insignificant cost does away with the unpleasant and often extremely laborious process of extracting the juices by pressure ajqdied to a bag containing the fruit. The result is certainly more cleanly, and at the same time more economical both of time and of material. The gas or oil stove has Ung since found a place in every household, and its steady flames, so easily regulated, reduce the syrup to jelly in less time and with less danger of scorching than the glowing range, which raises the temperature of the kitchen to fever-heat. To make good jelly, the first requisite is good fruit in good condition ; the next is good sugar, not only good, but the very best obtainabl...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GLEANINGS. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

GLEANINGS. The back door robs the house. A two-foot rule-keep your feet dry. A fat housekeeper makes lean executors. A hen to-morrow is better than an egg to-day. The most barren grounds are nearest the richest mines. A runaway match-the one you want to find in the dark. The burden of life is in the thought more than in the event. A good husband, like a good gas burner, never goes out nights. 11 is easy to make a resolution to be good, but very hard to keep it. The more women look into their glass, the less they look to their house. Temper and tongue are an unruly team-don't let them get away from you. Who never walks, save where he sees men's tracks, make- no discoveries. Small cheer and great welcome, according to Shakes peare, make a merry feast. We cannot get more out of human life than we put into it. An old home is like an old violin-the music of the past is wrought into it. Next to an effeminate man, there is nothing so dis agreeable as a mannish woman. A man is like an egg. ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RECIPES. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

RECIPES. APPLE TAPIOCA PUDDING.-Soak over night one cup of tapioca in six cups of water. Next morning add one cup sugar, one egg, and beat well together. Then pare, core, and chop fine, six or more apples, and stir with the tapioca in a pudding dish, and bake slowly. WHITE SAUCE.-ioz. of butter, ij^oz. of flour, half a teaspoonful of salt and a quarter teaspoonful of pepper. Mix together in a pan, add the milk gradually (about two teacupsfnl) ; let it boil, and serve for fish or vegetables. For rr.utton sauce add to the above a handful of parsley, washed well, and chopped very fine. CHILDREN'S PLUM PUDDING.-Quarter of a pound of finely chopped suet, the same ol grated bread crumbs, currants, raisins, ano flour. Add two tablespoonfuls of molasses and half a pint o( milk ; all of which must be well mixed together and boiled in a mould for three and a half hours. Serve with sweet sauce. FRENCH BREAD, -I lb. flour, I oz. butter, I egg, 3 spoonsful baking powder, a little salt. Mix salt ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Earning Money at Home. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

Earning Money at Home. i;V MAIM HA M. WIUTTIMORK. ÏTOK women who live in country homes, where fruit anil vegetables are obtainable, preserving is an interesting and paying indus try. As work, it only lasts six months in a year, but hard work during these six months makes possible a steady income for the rest of the year. Nice jellies, jams, pickles and sauces always find a ready salo, and bring good prices. Here, however, as in other work a specialty is best. A person who has a re putation for making remarkably fine grape jelly or oue who makes a certain delicate marmalade, is sure to have plenty to do. Make the jellies attractive by sealing them nicely, and have the pears white and the pickles well arranged ; in fact, make the out side as attractive as possible ; the inside will tell its own story. After making a quantity, go directly to some grocer and make arrangements for sel ling. If you cannot go directly, then write a concise letter telling what you have and what you want, ib...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISTRESS OR MAID. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

MISTRESS OR MAID. I WAS in the attic putting away the winter clothing when I heard Richard's voice from tie foot of the stairs. " Caroline, there is a young lady waiting to see you. " I noticed a slight hesitation before the word " lady. " , " Who is it ; a lady did you say ?" I asked as I descended the stairs. " She isn't dressed in satin and velvet, but I think she is a lady, " replied Richard, who has odd notions about some things. "One of the relief committee, perhaps," I said, after he had told me that he had found her at the door when he came home, and that she had inquired for me by name. " Whoever she may be, one may trust the clear light that shines from the windows of her soul," replied Richard. I knew what he meant when she turned her large gray eyes full upon me, One might well call them windows, I thought, as I looked into the clear, honest depths. Only innocence and truth could be seen there. She was fair and slender ; not angular but delicate, like one recently recove...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FUN. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 October 1890

FUN. - At tbe Table, Guests present. Mamma-"Why, Bessie ! Get down from the back of your chair. What are you doing ?" Bessie-"Mamma, you told me little girls should he seen, not heard." -He-"Doesn't it make you dizzy to swing in a hammock?" She (frankly)-"I don't believe I could be any giddier than I am." Husband-I say, wife, I'm ftoing into business in Wall street, and don't know whether to be a bull or a bear. Wife-Don't "wry, husband, now, because as long as you can get whisky you will always be a beast of some kind. "Say, faither, did ye hear the text the day ? It's gey an' queer. Says that a rich man canna enter the kingdom o' heaven. It's queer, awfu' queer." "What are ye mutterin' aboot, laddie? What's queer ?" "I've been wee'in things up, an' it seems to me a çey queer thing that if the rich man canna get to heaven he can aye get the best seat in the kirk." Judge-Now, Madam, don't object to this question Tell the court your age. Miss Longout-I do not see it is competent evid...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 5 November 1890

BA KING PCWDE R. If you do not already use it you certainly ought, as it far surpasses all other makes, and is appreciated as an inet t ¡mable boon by those who have learned its value. There is Nothing Else of the kind Equal to it. Try it 1 and yon will soon be convinced of this. Waugh's Baking Powder is Undoubtedly the Best li is prepared wish the uimostcare, by the aid of Special Mixing Machinery, and the ingredients used are the purest and best obtainable. PUDDINGS, CAKES, PASTRY, &C, are so much better with than without it. M ixrd wi! li 1 >ry Flower, it makes the very best SELF-RAISING FLOUR, and this should be prepa red only when yeo refaire te use it. It will be found a great ht&er than the so-called (ready made) " SELF RAISING FLOUR," which costs y«e more, and you do not know what is in it. Hie SUPERIOR QUALITY of WAUGH'S BAKING POWDER is at once apparent the first time you use it, and all who have used it can testify to its excellence. t tlie Great Intern...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DROLL THINGS SAID BY CHILDREN A PAIR OF KID GLOVES [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 5 November 1890

HOLL THINGS SAID BY pHILDREN A PAIR OF KID GLOVES is offered each month to the contributor of the best Original Droll Thing said by a child. Anecdotes for next month's competition to be sent in by the 22nd. inst. The prize this month is awarded to the contributor of the first related anecdote hereunder. Teacher giving a moral lesson to several ragged children and trying to instil into their young minds that they should always do as their father and mother tells them. Puzzled io year old "But please miss if yer mother tells yer to do one thing and yer father tells yer to do the other what are yer goin to do." Jimmy,-"Our pet cockatoo is dead and I'm awfully sorry," Ted, - "Why, was you so fond of him ?" Jimmy,-No, but he got blamed for everything, and now I do." Esmee.-"Has cousin Maurice got a birthday?" Mother.-"YeB he was born in February." Esmee.-"Who horned him ?" "Did he be chris tened ?" Mother.-"Yes of course he was." Esmee.-"Did he have his head washed in the church like the...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUIET WAYS ARE BEST [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 5 November 1890

QUIET WAYS ARE BEST What's the use of worrying, Of hurrying, And scurrying, Everybody flurrying, And breaking up their rest, When every one is teaching us, Preaching and beseeching us, To settle down the fuss ? For quiet ways are best The rain that trickles down in showers A blessing brings to the thirsty flowers; Sweet fragrance from each brimming cup,. The gentle zephyrs gather up. There's ruin in the tempest's path; There's ruin in a voice of wrath; And they alone are blest Who early learn to dominate Themselves, their violence abate, " And prove, by their serene estât». That quiet ways are best. Nothing's gained by worrying, By hurrying And scurrying; With fretting and with flurrying The temper's often lost; And in pursuit of some small prize We rush ahead, and are not wise, And find the unwonted exercise A fearful price has cost. 'Tis better far to join the throng That do their duty right along; Keluctant they to raise a fuss, Or make themselves ridiculous. Calm and serene in h...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POET'S PAGE. WHAT IS THE USE OF TRYING. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 5 November 1890

-=>.-t-»-<5..<> WHAT IS THE USE OF TRYING. "What's the use of trying? I never can learn to fly. See how the lark goes floating Up to the sunlit sky; "He never failed, as I have See how he flies at ease, Light as a down of thistle Tossed on a tremulous breeze. "I have been foolishly trying, Thinking I, too, might rise. I'll stay down here in the hedges And leave to the lark the skies." So he stayed in the crowded hedges. And lived through the Summer long, Only a common sparrow One of a common throng. "What's the use of trying? Pouring o'er book and slate. I finland shall keep on failing, For men are created great. "Tis folly to think that study For so many hours a day. Is going to make our boys and girls Wise men and women alway. So what is the use of trying? A common lot shall be mine: Why muddle my brain with study, I never was made to shine." So away in the closet cupboard The books kept gathering dust, And the mind they were meant to nourish Was buried...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RECIPES. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 5 November 1890

RECIPES. SPONGE CAKE for Two. Beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, add one teacupful of sugar, then the yolks; lastly one cupful of flour. To be perfect, this cake must always be put together in the order given in this recipe. FRIED BANANAS.-Peel the fruit, leaving it whole. Roll in flour and fry in deep fat, using a frying-b&sket. Cook till done through, and of a delicate golden-brown. Sprinkle with sugar, and grate a little nutmeg. LEMON TEA CAKES.-One egg, one cup of sugar, half cup of butter, three tablespoonfuls of milk, thejniceanp and grated rind of two small lemons, one teaspoonful of Waugh's baking powder, flour enough to roll out. Cut with a cake-cutter. BAKED BANANAS for DESSERT.-Put three teaspoonsful of butter, six teaspoonsful of sugar, three teaspoonsful of lemon juic? in a bowl, which must be set in hot water till the butter is melted. Peel and halve six bananas, dip in the sauce, and place in a dripping-pan; bake thirty minutes, basting twice durin...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WORLD'S GOOD WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 5 November 1890

THE WORLD'S GOOD WOMEN. Good women are as sentinels ; in the darkness of earth's night They hold with stout hearts, silently, Life's out-posts towards the light ; And at God Almighty's roll-call, 'mong the hosts that answer " Here, " The voices of good women sound strong, and sweet, and clear. Good women are brave soldiers ; in the thickest of the fight They stand with stout hearts patiently, embattled for the right ; And tho' no blare of trumpet or roll of drum is heard, Good women the world over are an army of the Lord. Good women save the nation ; though they bear not sword nor gun, Their panoply is righteousness, their will with God's as one ; ,," Each in her single person revealing God on earth, '^Blowing that so, and only so is any life of worth. M)ost talk of women's weakness ? I tell you that this hour The weight of this world's future depends upon their . power : And down the track of ages, as Time's flood-tides are told, The level of their height is marked by the place tha...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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