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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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What Makes the Kinemacolour Colour? A LIVING PICTURE WONDER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

What Makes the Kinema colour Colour ? A lil V.I NO 1'ICTUUK- WON'IiUIt. lou yo prouawy oiien asKeu your self the above question while watch ing the natural colour pictures on tho screen, or at least you- must have heard thoso about you specu lating over the matter ami probably offering various explanations, fio two of which agreed. i First of all, the film used in mak ing Kinemncolor pictures is made panchromatic, that is, sensitised for all the rays of the spectrum. This peculiarly sensitive film is then ex posed in the camera, behind a re volving shutter in which are fitted two filters (or screens) coloured red | and green. Thirty-two pictures a ; second are taken, alternately, through the red and green filters. This is the vital part to be re membered. Ordinary white light— sunlight—contains nil the colours of the spectrum blended together. The I I primary colours are red and green, and red and green light properly I blended will give any shade or tint, i In exposing the film a r...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Incubators in Egypt. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Incubators in Egypt. The announcement is made by Mr. W. II. Cadman that ho has dis covered how t>in. ancient I.vgyptinns incubated chickcn.s to the number of 120,000,000 a year. fie has found incubators which he states were used in Kgypt 3,000 years ago. The secret has been well guarded, but it is laid bare at last. They had no oil stoves or gus or elec tric hen ted incubators, but 4. hey had ovens which worked much better, even though they required more constant -tending. Knch oven was calculated to hold 7,000 eggs, and the fuel by which it was heated consisted of chopped .straw and dung, but for tho last ten days of the hatching the energy was sup plied altogether by the chickens themselves. It is the commonest error of those operating our modern incubators to use too much heat, especially towards the end of the period, and now u'o may learn from tho old Egyptians how not to do things as well as how to do them. The use of tho straw and otluT light fuel showy that the Egyptians ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RISKY. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

ltlSKY. Two impecunious Scotsmen onco came upon a wuyside itui. They hail only ."saxpence" between them,, so th*»y ordered one "nip o' whusky." They were hesitating who should hnvo the first drink, when mi. ac quaintance juined them. Pretending that thuy hnd just drunk, one of them handed the new coiner the whisky, requesting him to join thrm in a drink. Ho did •so, «wl. after a fewininutcs of painful suspense, saKl : "Now, hoys, you'll have one with llll1 ?" "Wft.sna that weel managed, mon?" said one of his companions after wards. "Ay." said the other, "but droad ful risky." "Why is it," queried the fair widow, "that they always say a man ' pines ' for a woman ?" "I supposo," growled the fussy bachelor, "it's because pine is about the softest wood there is."

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
When You Buy a Pipe. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

When You Buy a Pipe. •There «cems to be no doubt that when you put a new pipo in your mouth you run the rink of infect ing yourself with the germs of -any number of serious discuses. The risk is all the greater i if you urc n confirmed smoker, for then the mu cous membranes of your mouth and throat are npt to bo tender and more susceptible to infection. Jf you keep your eyes open when ' ,in a shop where pipes, are sold you will notice that the average pipe purchaser puts at least a do/en pipe steins in his mouth and blovs and sucks on them before making a final selection. Even if his mouth is free from the germs of a com- | municable disease the moistened pipe-stems he lays buck on the counter are just tho things to catch any germs or dirt that may happen to be floating in the air and hold them for tho next customer. Although there are la-vs against spitting in public-places and against the use of common drinking cups, there is none to prevent the inno cent purchaser of a pipe from ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Water-Bearing Trees. ABORIGINES BUSH CRAFT. A SIMPLE LIFE SAVER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Water-Bearing Trees. 1 : AllOIMMXES HUSH CUAI''T. ' A .SI.UI'L,K The method of obtaining water from eucalyptus roots as practised hy the* natives of the country be tween the Ijachlnn- and Jmrling Kivers, was described * by the late K. if. JJennett .MO years ago in a paper read before the. Linncan So ciety. He then stated that there won* several kinds of trees from which water was obtained, including three species of eucalyptus, a '.ape ries of nakia. (needle-bush),, and kurmjong. The eucalypti consisted of n gum (the largest of the back country trees), a box, and mallee. The first-named was the most . pre ferred, as yielding the greatest quan tity, ami as the method was the some in all cases, this one will serve for a description of the modus ope randi. This tree, which somewhat resembles the red gum in appear-, nine—the leaves being narrow and of j n silvery colour—grow's chielly on ! sandy or light loamy soil, ■ mid throws out numerous lateral roots at n depth of from 0»n. to l'Ji...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Cobram Courier. ESTABLISHED 1888. THURSDAY, MAKCU 26, 1914. Local and General Items. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

'jjpie (jfobi'anj (j?oiii'iep. EsTABUSIIBn 1689 • THURSDAY, MAKCU 2G, 1014. Local and General Items. Rai.vf.\li..—On Tuesday morning nnd iigiiin in theaftornoOn two welcome showers of ruin visited the district, and though the quantity was small in comparison with what is desired by the farming community nevertheless the total of G1 points was acceptable to those depending on house tanks, and also as a means of temporarily laying the dust Thunderstonny con ditions prevailed prior to the showers, and it was apparent that the rain was not an even or general one, and this is confirmed by telephone reports from adjoining places as follows :—Finley 103, Alulwala 100, Berrigan 5)5, To cumwal 89, Strathmerton 55, and Nuinurkali 33. Contrary to the ex perience of the last five or six years there has been 110 heavy rainV this summer, though 70 points were regis tered in January, but that quantity was spread over several days. Last month there was nono, and the' total for this month to date is...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Two Russian Incidents. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Two Russian Incidents. ———' On the occasion of the corination of the Czar, thousands of people were crushed to death owing to the appulingly inadequate 'arrangements made by the officials. An attempt was made to hide from-the Czar the extent of Ihe disaster. But, in spite of the hurry to take them away, tho number of the victims was . so considerable that it was found impossible to dispose of them all at once. The Kmpcror was expected at any moment, and he could not be allowed to see all these bodies scattered everywhere about. Soldiers were requisitioned, and they hastily—will such fatal stupidity be believed ?—thrust the corpses under tho very pavilion in which the Sovereign was to alight and from the balcony of which he was to wit ness the feast. Thus by a terrible blunder, of which he knew nothing,, hut for which he was* ever after bitterly reproached, Nicholas II. ac tually stood for more than five hours over the dead bodies of his subjects, . killed in "their endeavour to welc...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Commonwealth JjgfeBank of Hustualta HEAD OFFICE SYDNEY This Bank ij open tor all claws of GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS it EQUITABLE BUILDING, OOLLINS STREET, MELBOURNE Also at Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide, I'ertb, Hobart, Brisbane, ftockhampton, Townsville, and London. • Cabla remittances made to, nnd drafts drawn on foreign places direct. Foreign bill* negotiated aud collected. fatten of credit issued to any part of the world. Bill* negotiated or forwarded for' collection, banking and Exchange Business of ever/ description transacted within the Common* wealth, United. Kingdom and abroad. Current accounts opened. Interest paid on Axed deposits. Advances made against approved securities. SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT . Victorian Central Officii 317 OOLLIM8 STREET, MELBOURNE. Branches in the abort cltics and 2,000 AffOnclaa at Post Offices throughout the Commonwealth. Dtpositi from 1/- to £300* Intoroftt at 3*.' per annum. Deposits or Withdrawals may be made at any Branch or Agency within the Com...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A GLASS CLOCK. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

A GLASS CLOCK. 1 A clock constructed throughout of I glass is the result of six yearn' work 1 on the jmrt of a bavarian glass pol isher. The plates and pillars whicJi form the frame work are of i.'lf*'5. > and are bolted together with screws. Tlie dial-plate, hands, shafts, and coff'whecls are of gl si, and i glass wedges and pins are us"d f r i fastening the various parts of Ihc running gear together. Liko the clock jtself, the key hy which it is wound, is of glass. '*jc construction of the remarkable time I piece was a matter of infinite pain*-' I Some of the parts had to he mutlc us many.an forty times before a clock that would go could lie pro duced. Cyclists in Denmark are "forbidden by law to ride faster than the ordin ary speed of a cab through any c^>'*

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Giant Mollusc that Traps Men. PEARL DIVEBS SEIZED AND HELD AT BOTTOM OF SEA. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Giant Mollusc that Traps Men. T PEARL DIVEBS SEIZED AND rrrer.n AT BOTTOM OF SEA. I Pearling, and romance are synony mous In tho youthful mlua—facts in the Industry In Australia bring thin same romance closely homo to thn grown-up reader. Started In Torres Straits fifty years ago by a band of intrepid white men, it has been car ried on ever since with varying good fortune. Sharks, which are supposed to be a great terror, give the average diver little concern ; ho is more afraid of the sea-eel of North Queensland. A diver is perfectly safe on the sea bottom, because man-eating sharks are not ground-feodors ; if they sco him they wait till lie rines /or a breath of air, and thon they try to intercept him, but the diver and b's long knife nearly always win. The dlvor's worst enemy in the deep is the giant mollusc. This creature, from five to seven feet across the shell, lies with extended jaws waiting for proy. The driver drops out of hi3 boat with a heavy stone attached to his feet, a...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How Corpulence Comes. ROYAL ROAD TO GOUT AND RHEUMATISM. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

How Corpulence Comes. ItOYAI; KOAII TO CJOUT AND lUllfllJMATISM. The Into Sir ffonry Thompson worned persons reaching raiddle age not to muulnto the Strasbourg goose, that is stuffed with food it rnnnot digest in order thftt its jit cr may, acquire that disease which gives it the fine Ua\our so dear to gourmets. The great physician pointed out that in youth the body I mi assimilate vast quantities of nutritious food, but that as age creeps on it gradually becomes less nnd less able to take care of strong foods. The unused material Js then stored, in the form of tfat, on the external surface, or packed among tho internal organs, if the individual lias a facility for converting it into fat ; if he have not such a facility "the over-supply of nutritious ele ments ingested must go somewhere, inoiv or l-'ss directly, to produce di s-jise in some other form, probably „l first interfering with the action of the liver, and next appearing as gout or rheumatism, or as the cause of fluxes ami ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Weight of Calves. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Weight of Calves. ♦ Calves usually weigh 8 per cent, of the weight of tlio dam. Eighty pounds is a common weight, but they sometimes vary from 501b. upward to 1251b., or even more. A calf nine days old would likely weigh about 201b. more than when born. For rapid growth • the calf should have all the now milk it will take without digestive troubles, and it should suck it rather than drink it. To supplement the milk there should be good pasture in summer and silage and clover or lucerne hay in winter. As a pro in ration to be fed the year around ns soon as the calf will eat, nothing excels a mixture of equal parts by mea sure of ground corn, ground oats, and bran. In order to cheapen the grains the bran is frequently re placed by cut lucerne hay and a little meal. Sunday-school Teacher : "What do we mean by the quick and the dead ?" Small IJoy : "Them as get out of the way of motor-curs is quick, and them os don't is dead."

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
World's Wool Production. LATEST OFFICIAL RETURNS AND ESTIMATES. NORTH AMERICA. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

World's Wool Production. LATEST OFFICIAL RETURNS AND ESTIMATES. NORTH AMERICA. Country. - Lbs. United States 302,343,400 British Provs '... 11,210,000 Mexico 7,000,000 Central America and West Indies ... 1,000,000 321,553,400 SOUTH AMERICA. Argentina 368,151,500 Brazil ,... 1,130,000 Chile ... 27,745,030 Peru.... 9,940,000 Falkland* ... ... 4,324,000 Uruguay 138,332,375 All other S. America ... 5,000,000 554,622.955 ASIA. British India 60,000,000 China 50,000,000 Russia (Asiatic) 60,000,000 j Turkey (Asiatic) ... ... 90,000,000' Persia" ... 90,000,000 All other Asia ... 1,000,000 | '273,146,000 EUROPE. United Kingdom ... ... 142,877,011 Austria Hungary ... ... 41,600,000 France ... ... 78,000,000 Germany ... ... ... 25,600,000 Spain 52,000,000 Portugal ......... .10,000,000 Greece ... ... ... 14,000,000 Italy ... 21,500,000 Russia ... ... ... ... 320,000,000 Turkey & Balkan'State* 90,500,000 All other Europe ... ... 18,000,000 814,077,011 AFRICA. Algeria 33,184,000 British A...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(Copyright.) THE Riverside-House Mystery. A Story of Love, Intrigue and Intense Dramatic Action, CHAPTER 1. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

(Copyright.) THE Riverside-House Mystery. ■¥ A Story of Love, Intrigue and Intense Dramatic Action, By BARBARA KENT. CHAt'TER I. The club-room was, very bright and wnrm. Under a tinted lamp two men sat smoking, yawning occasion ally as they looked ovit at the falling snow, and then at the leap ing fire in the brass grnte. ''J say, Armstrong, did yon know Raritan had come back ?" asked little Charley Were. "The deuce !" said the other. , "Not the deugc at all, but a great, big, tanned fellow, with eyes like sapphires, and a handshake strong j enough to grind nn ordinnr;/ man's fist to bits.' l.ucky fellow', ton. He's hnd his share of roughing it. lie went awn.v—-let's see—eight yenrs ago, a stripling of twenty, poor as a pauper. He speculates, tries min ing, spends four years on a trader in Honolulu, loses two fortunes, makes ; a third, bigger than either of the others, nnd, to cap his great good Juck, hears that his great-aunt Ma- ! tilda has at last gone ofl the hooks and left him ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. MAKING MONEY OUT OF COWS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

THE FARM. * MAKING MONEY OUT OF (SOWS. There art ten rulej for making money out of cows and they all begin with "milk good eow«." To put the caso in a nutshell, or rather to skltn the cream from the whole matter, let us admit that there are, nay, seven fundamental principles of successful dairying, uliout as follows 1. Weed out tho poor cows by means ot the scales and the Bab cock test. 2. Feed tho good cows plenty of clean, choico stuff as close to a balanced ration as possible. 3. Eliminate competition by pro ducing a better product than the other fellow and demanding a good price for It. 4. Head the herd with a high class, purebred sire. 5. Raising the promising calves from the best calves only. 6. Develop a market for your surplus bull calvea and other stock. 7. Feed the mind of the man be hind the cow.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER II. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

CHAPTER IT. : It was six months later, U16 mid dle of Juno/but not the sort of wear thcr one might cxpect from tho sunny month of • roses. This day was wet; a chill wind stirring that robbed the npple.trees of their radiant pink bloom in shoals. The sky was heavy, a brooding, leaden grey ; the cows browsing: in the damp pastures shiv ered and sought the shelter afTord ed by the blustering, swaying trees. All the landscape was drear and cold. In one of the suburbs of New York, just where all traces of the city's life were 'being lost in the green and solitude of the country, there was a long, narrow road, that cut through a wood, sloped down ft hill, and then followed a strnggling reed-edged stream for more than a mile. On this road there stood a strange old house. It was lonely, shutter l ed, out of the regular track of tra vel, and distinctly under a cloud i of some sort. I Silent, weather-beaten, forlorn, it i remained apart, holding within its walls the secret of a murder that ha...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. When making blue-water for clothes add a little salt to it. This dis tributes the colour evenly and pre vents "patches." Celery may be freshened by being left overnight in a solution of salt and waterl To make cabbage digestible, vrheu half boiled pour off 'the water and place in fresh boiling water. One teaspoonful of.vinegar Is a substitute for an egg, and makes a eaUc light in which dripping has been used instead of butter. A little soot rubbed on to a greasy stove after frying potatoes or fish will .make shorter work afterwards of the business of polish ing, and will economise the black lead. • White point can bo kept in good condition if whiting is mixed to a stiff paste with warm water and used ' instead of soap. Rinse off with clear water and dry with n duster or leather. Browir. leather travelling*bag8, or any other brown leather goods, may be benutifully polished by rubbing them well with the inside of a ba nana skin, and then polishing with a soft dry clot...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER III. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

CHAPTER III, ■Nine o'clock. V The first act of "A While Lie " was over, and the plaudits-were still echoing in Vida Hetherford's _ cars, i as, gathering up the Mowing satin i train • of her exquisite gown, she hurried into her dressing room. . "The last night—th*j Inst night of triumph this season,"-she'thought* ■ as she stood with flashing eyes, dia mond-bright, and . sweet, flushed, cheeks. "Will Sydney come — to-1 night ?" I •A great change • had conic over i young Mrs. Hetherford's 'life since | we saw her standing at Sidney i Rnritan's sid<v gating v.ith *u\ve-| stricken eyes at>the dead body of her husband, who had mndo her young life, n series- of horrors. "With her freedom came the know ledge that herjhusband Jiad stjuan dered his money madly, wantonly, 1 und died a pauper. ^ The old Hetherford mansion went, down under the auctioneer's hammer j to the'highest bidder. Poverty lift- ; ed its lean face to peer into the eyes of the sad-hearted young widow j who was...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ladies'Column. A Dainty Teacloth. MAKE ONE FOR THE BAZAAR. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

Ladies'Column. t A Dainty Teacloth. MAKE ONE FOR THE BAZAAR. A new idea for a dainty teaclolh is always welcome, and In the sketch our artist illustrates a par* ticularly pretty suggestion that may be easily carried out. In size tho cloth shouhi be a yard square, and the material is cut into curves at the edges and trim med with a broad /rill of laco. This frill is headed with a very narrow silver braid arranged in a tiny loop hetween ench curve. A pale blue satin applique, out lined with some of the earn* narrow silver braid ornaments each corner j of the cloth, and the same design in ■ j rather a larger size appears in the centra. Diagram A shows the shape in which the satin should be cut out, ancl_for the corners it should mea sure about Ave inches across, and for the centre about seven. In the large sketch the cloth is shown folded up, # and only one corner of It is visible ; but in Diagram B it j is illustrated laid out quite tint, I so that the whole design may be seen. .When ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
French Birds took Aeroplane for Enemy. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 26 March 1914

French Birds took Aero plane for Enemy. An extraordinary instance of the intelligence of birds forms the sub ject of a letter received by thr French ! Ministry: of Agriculture from an inspector of forests. Some time ago the inspector received complaints from.sportsmen that quail and partridges had become scarce in certain districts. On examining the matter he found the birds had 'In serted the regions in which aero dromes had been installed. Seem ingly they took the monoplanes anc biplanes for enormous birds of prey. Finding after some time, however, that their ranks were not thinned by the strange creatures hovering overhead, .partridges and quail de spatched scouts to the aerodrome; to examine tho air craft at close quarters. The result of the investi gations of these feathered envoy* was evidently reassuring, for the birds returned to their former haunt? and the preserves around J.e .Man* and Itheinis ure now as well stock ed as formerly.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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