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Elephind.com contains 937,800 items from Sunday Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Sunday Times SUNDAYm JUNE 8, 1902. BRITAINS BEWARE! [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

THE SUNDAY TIMES SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 1902   BRITAINS BEWARE!     Now that peace is declared—a matter of rejoicing to us all—it is possible that British statesmen will find time   and opportunity to look into the         means of defending our Empire from   a threatening disasterous commerical war. Nations may be conquered by other weapons than the brass cannon and the flashing sword. Spain became a prey to her neighbors when she lost her maritime supremacy in the storm that wrecked the Armada. The in- evitable ruin of France followed the destruction of her fleets at the Nile and Trafalgar. The Dutch went under when her ocean carrying trade was wrenched from her by the prowess of   English admirals and the British   navigation laws. And our own Eng-   land must follow in the wake of these       &...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
LOTON THE GAGGER. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

LOTON THE GAGGER. MAYOR Loton, in the panoply of his robes, presided at the Town Hall meeting to de- nounce the imperfections of the Early Closing Act. Not being quite sure how the meeting would go, in his introductory re- marks, he declared himself absolutely im- partial, as of course a chairman ought to be. Later on, however, Tom Molloy, still reeking with gore from the assault case, rose to explain that Mayor Loton was a rabid anti- early-closer. And at the end of the meet- ing Loton proudly endorsed the mercurial Molloy's opinion. This may be allowed to pass as mere inconsistency, so common among our public men as to be held the   normal attitude; but when this dignified chairman preeumed to act the censor of the matter to be delivered in advocacy of re- form, he evinced an arrogance that would damn most ordinary mortals. It had been announced by advertisement that at Friday night's meeting a petition from the ladies of West Perth calling upon Mr. Leake to resign wo...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MERCURIAL MOLLOY PLEADS IN POLICE COURT. A PUNY PROBOSCIS PUNCHER. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

PLEADS IN POLICE COURT. A PUNY PROBOSCIS PUNCHER. Tom Molloy, theatre proprietor, builder of temples to Thespis, Czar over players, Doge over companies, would-be legislator, a civic father and a Justice of the Peace, in a common police court fined 1s. and costs for gorily breaking the peace ! An old man in his employ asking for a paltry amount due to him (a trifling 5s.) is not only shown the door with Molloy's groper foot, but has his nose painted with flowing coronation colors! The account of this vicious dwarf's spasmodic pugilism, in defence of meanness   and repudiation, is but mildly given in the daily papers, but the municipal counsel should cut it out and have it framed as the proud testimony to the ruddy heroism of the manikin Molloy, the cowardly councillor And in the police court where the mercurial   Molloy intrudes his insipid physiognomy 0n   the bench he should be   Painted and Framed and hung conspicuously, so that ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MITCHELL THE MATE. CAPTAIN STEALS HIS HALO. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

MITCHELL THE MATE.   CAPTAIIN STEALS HIS HALO. Fair play is bonny play, and Mitchell, the third mate of the Boveric has not received it. We perfectly approve of the public testimonial to the brave little crew who brought the news of the disaster in the life- boat to Fremantle. They rightly deserved the gold watches and chains presented to them, but why the especial glorification by Captain Laurie of of Captain Leslie? Three cheers might be tolerated, but to make out that the s. s. Narung found the Boveric owing to Captain Leslie's prowess on the ocean is balderdash. The fact is Mitchell.   the mate, suggested and prepared all that led to the Boveric being taken in tow by the rescuing Steamer ; and Captain Leslie simply did nothing but fall in with Mitchell's plans. But when Leslie rose to reply to Laurie's Self-rising Soft Soap, he melodramatically said in effect—"Alone, I did it." He read a speech evidently pre- pared beforehand, in which he made no meutio...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CYNICAL SYNOPSIS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

"All the venal crowd."     —Byron.   Volumes in a word—peace. Leake's lazy legacy will be lethargy.   The Victorian peacock has lost its feathers, but it can still laugh. Forster, late of the Perth Herald, has   joined the Melbourne Age staff. Langford is in favor of the Early Closing   Act. Ask him if he has read it ? The daily Press is not so jubilant at peace   as they were over war. Dickens describing Illingworth : "I'm so   very 'umble."   The Police Department has for a long   time been working three sub-inspectors   short. Hare's parsimonious economy. About the best way to cleanse Fremantle   would be to pull it down and rebuild it with   a view to better sanitation. To Western Australia the first effects of peace will be an early exodus. More's the pity for such folly. The Leedervilleites are strongly protest...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
VERSE—AND WORSE [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

"To cheat thee of a sigh, Or charm thee to a tear." -MOORE.   The price of the Coronation—the settle- ment of the Boer War. . . . . T'othersider: "Are you interested in genealogy ? Ever looked up your ancestral tree?" Sandgroper: "Never did. Fact is,       I'd be afraid there might be a man hanging   from one of its branches." It happened at an auction sale held recently in Perth. The persons whose household goods were being slaughtered had been of a pious temperament, and had a large quantity of scriptural texts and mottoes. One of these, "Abide With Me," beautifully framed, only produced a bid of 6d.! The auctioneer glared at the bidder, a   church-going old lady. " You can't insult me, madam,'' he said severely, "but please don't insult the Lord by offering 6d. for a beautiful text like that." The dame bridled up. "The Lord," she retorted, "advises us to accept little with a good grace, and he'd take ev...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
UNIVERSAL PEACE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

UNIVERSAL PEACE. Br DBYBLOWER. The dawn of Peace has flashed the sky, the protocol is signed,   God's glorious sunshine floods the earth, the shadows roll behind,   The gory fangs of War are drawn, its sullen roars and yells   Are silenced as a thousand steeples rock   beneath their bells.   To the cities where the Jack flies o'er the keen commercial hum, Worn and gaunt with battle's burden from the field commandoes come, Sick at heart of martial murder, praying for its swift surcease. When man shall greet his fellow-man in Universal peace. War-worn warriors pass in silence through the victors thund'rous cheers, Seeing visions of a veldt-grave through a mistiness of tears.   Striplings grown from boyhood since the men in khaki came, Vainly seek the old, old homestead, blotted out by axe and flame. In the crowded concentration camp, with heavy heart and sore, The white-faced widow waits for him whose last, ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A THEATRICAL THUG. (See Cartoon on first page of Supplement.) [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

A THEATRICAL THUG. (See Cartoon on first page of Supplement.)   I'm called the Theatrical Thug; I throttle the Thespian mug. I pummel the weak   And no brother beak Dares send me to Fremantly Jug. Though Rickards is reckoned a lynx,   In his cunning there's several kinks, For I got him to snap     At my dirty death-trap With its dangers, its debts and its stinks, Now I've got him I'll put on the screw With the clutch of a covetous Jew ; For had I not pelf I'd eat by myself   Those Metropole "suppers for two."

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SPEAR-PARKER CASE. CABINET BLAMES LEAKE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

SPEAR-PARKER CASE.   CABINET BALMES LEAKE. If Leake would only keep his own counsel we should probably have less to say about him ; but when he is almost equally com- municative to friend and foe alike on his   marvellous statesmanship in connection with the Spear-Parker case, we have no alterna-     tive but to keep the public posted in his   vagaries. The latest revelation obtained   through his garrulity is no less than the as- tounding news that he undertook the ap- pointment of a Royal Commission to inquire into the conduct of his brother-in-law—or, rather, according to his own allegations, of Mr. Spear and Mr. George—without so much as consulting a single member of his Cabinet. He gave the information to the reporters with an air of assurance that war- ranted credit that the Commission had been   decided on; and, nextly, that the Spear- Parker trial, in which Mr. Spear was ready To Prove...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
LOOTING LIQUIDATORS. EQUIVOCAL ESTATES ENTANGLEMENT POCKETING PALTRY PERSONAL PERQUISITES. The Case of Hartle, Galt, Dunn and Co. Ltd. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

LOOTING LIQUIDATORS. EQUIVOCAL ESTATES ENTANGLEMENT. POCKETING PALTRY PERSONAL PERQUISITES. The Case of Hartle, Galt, Dunn and Co. Ltd. It has become a recognised axiom in the commercial community that once an estate is handed over to the tender mercies of the liquidator or to assignees, that it melts like the baseless fabric of a vision, and the con- fiding creditors and shareholders (if a com- pany) may well despair of ever receiving anything like an adequate return from the realisable assets. It is simply a matter of     book-keeping on the part of the liquidator,   and in the great majority of cases the estate   is realised upon to suit the pockets not of the creditors or shareholders, but of the un-   scrupulous liquidator who sucks the whole orange and then hands the skin back. The public will understand us best by giving an   example--only one, it is true, but a glaring   one, and also ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
GANGS AND GANGERS. SURLY SERVILITIES. BRIBING WITH WHISKY. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

GANGS AND GANGERS. SURLY SERVILITIES. BRIBING WITH WHISKY. If there is anything in the world calcu- lated to disgust ordinary humanity with the ideals of socialism, as understood in its poli- tical aspect, and implying public ownership and management through the Government of all avenues of human industry, it is the absolute disregard of the common rules of honor and honesty exhibited by the average Governmental overseer. It is, of course, a necessity to have bodies of men directed hy an overseer, or to put it in everyday work- ing parlance, for gangs to have gangers. In an ideal state of socialism the gang and gangers mutually interested in serving   the Community; their interests in no way   clash, and they have no divided purposes;     and such words as "boss" and servant or master and slave have no meaning as expres- sive of their relationship to each other. Un- fortunately this ideal seems as far off as Nanson's Political Mill...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
For the Farmers. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. To Poison Dingoes:—"Grazier" (Katanning) writes:—If not already tried, the following may be worth a test. Take a small blad-   der (sheep's or pig's will do), and place therein a quantity of blood, with which a litfle strychnine has been mixed. Hang this on a low branch or twice over track which dogs are known to follow, the blad- der being suspended two or three feet from ground. A shy dingo may be   tempted to take poison this way. An aniseed trail may be laid to the bait to ensure the particular track being taken, as occasion requires. A few strong dog-   traps set along a trail of this description might assist in reducing the number of       dingoes, the traps to be hidden by a     light covering of leaves or earth, and fenced round with a few saplings to pre-     vent stock getting into them.     &...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
RURAL TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

RURAL TOPICS. Agricultural societies should unite and go in for the single judge system.   The New South Wales experts are in- vestigating the cause of the spot hole disease   in fruit.           Properly managed the production of mush- rooms is a profitable business. The main thing is to have a cheap access to large   quantities of horse manure.                 Coolgardie mushrooms fetch as high as 1s. 6d. per lb. in Perth.               To produce a ton of mushrooms requires   160 cartloads of manure.     If a horse flinches while being shod remove the nail at once and disinfect the hole with 5 per cent. of carbolic acid.   &nbs...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Ear-marking for Stock. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

The system of ear-marking sheep and cattle shown in our sketch (from "Hoad's Dairyman") is extremely simple, and by its means the stock-owner spill have a ready means of identifying every animal in his stud. It is best to commence with No. 1 in both sexes. When the figure required is above 5 two cuts are made, thus for 8 the cuts 5 and 3 ere employed, and the same on the other ear for numbers over 50.  

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Conformation of Cattle. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

Conformation of Cattle. The difference of form in the beef and milk types of cattle can be seen by a glance at our sketches (from the "National Pro- visioner"). This contrast between the two types of domestic cattle is most interesting, and many be observed in any herd in which the two types are raised. In figs. 1. and 3 the outlines of the beef and dairy type are   shown from a posterior point of view. The Fig.2       beef animal is shown to be nearly level on top, and to almost fill the square completely, leaving but a little space unoccupied if the legs were cut off. The dairy animal is com- paratively thin at the rump, the tail head     is particularly angular at its setting on, the belly sets slightly over the rectangle, while the thighs and hindquarters are considerably smaller. Viewed from the side the body of   the beef animal (fig. 2), if the legs, head, Fig. 4.   and nec...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
ORCHARD WORK. HINTS FOR FRUIT GROWERS. No. IV. Cutting Back. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

ORCHARD WORK.   HINTS FOR FRUIT GROWERS.     NO. IV. Cutting Back.       This important and necessary operation requires careful attention. Frequently it is neglected, in consequence of which many trees die, or make very feeble growth. The method pursued in cutting back must be   somewhat modified according to the size, the age, and shape of the tree. If a two-year- old tree, and it has been started the right height, with a more or less branching top, select, say, three or four branches, which head back to a few buds each; the remain-   ing branches remove entirely. In cases when the top is not well formed, or has been started too high, remove all side branches entirely, and start the head afresh as with a one-year-old tree. Unless the trees have been started right in the nursery is it best to begin with one-year-old trees, because they can be trained from the be- ginning, so that...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A BLOOD-SUCKING LANDS OFFICE [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

The pioneer settlers of the West have just grounds for complaint at the partiality of a fitfully parsimonious Government. The struggling settler, who sacrifices all the pleasures of life to making the land a fertile support to its inhabitants, has to pay all his dues to the Government in advance. If he fails, he is fined and the fine is high, being no less than 1s. in the pound. Thus, by way of example, supposing a settler has taken up land necessitating the payment of £20 half yearly. If he be a day late in his payment he is compelled to pay £1 extra. This is a hardship in itself, but there is another. The half year runs from January 1 to June 30, but he must pay his half-yearly instalment in May, thus giving the Government the use of his money for a month without interest. This is in striking contrast to the way busi- ness is done with city speculators. The in-   fluential dummy in Perth is permitted not only to run into arrears, but he has only too frequently all his...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THE STIRLING ESTATE. SWINDLE SHOULD BE STOPPED. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

THE STIRLING ESTATE. SWINDLE SHOULD BE STOPPED. "Bunkum" writes: No doubt you   are aware of the requisition that was   sent to the Mayor of Bunbury to call a public meeting to bring pressure to bear on the Government to compel the purchase of this land after the Government had refused to do so. Now, who were the requisitionists? To judge by the names, I put it down that they are people who know about as much of the Stirling Estate (or least the majority of them) as I do about the dark side of the moon. Next, who is the Mayor, the convener of the meeting? Why the son of the man who has been trying to sell the land for the last three or four years and whose interest it is to   Get His Friends to back him np to force the Govern- ment to purchase! They event went   so far as to spread a bogus report that a Coolgardie man was prepared to put down £10,000 for the estate ! Where is he now, since the Government de- clines to buy ? Now as ...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
HINDOO AND A POLICEMAN. A FAST SPRINTY. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

HINDOO AND A POLICEMAN A FAST SPRINT. Quite a sensation was created at a town along the Great Southern Railway recently by the appearance in the streets of an infuriated Hindoo, in pursuit of a stalwart dusky-looking individual, who, with hat in hand, and his hair standing on end, did the fastest time over a distance that has ever been accomplished in these parts. The war whoops of the excited Hindoo considerably helped the pursued in his flight, and when the two were career- ing along the main gravelled road of the otherwise quiet township the householders in the vicinity rushed to their doors to witness what they thought to be a cavalcade. Himself becoming more and more excited as the chase continued, the Hindoo Filled the Air with his hideous cries after the fleeing one. Two or three times during the chase the Hindoo caught the object of pursuit, but the clutch was only mo- mentary, resulting in double somer- saults and "up and at it again" runs. Finding the Hindoo's staying caba...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THEATRICAL. THEATRE ROYAL. " BELLE OF NEW YORK." [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 8 June 1902

THEATRICAL. THEATRE ROYAL. "BELLE OF NEW YORK."   To-morrow evening will open the return   season of Mr. J. G. Williamson's Musical     Comedy Company in "The Belle of New York." Our readers are already conversant with the merits of the members of this bril- liant company, though to-morrow night's performance will introduce to a Perth audience Miss Lulu Evans, from the Savoy   Theatre, London. The production is to be under the stage direction of Mr. Fred Graham. It is only intended to run the piece for four nights, as the whole season will be confined to eight nights only.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
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