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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

LADIES TAILORING There is "Something Differ- ent" about the properly tailored woman that always commands attention—   something that makes the other woman turn round. More than mere material is tailored into the VEREYS Costume or Topcoat — highly skilled technical knowledge; up-to-the minute style ; individual treatment. MADE TO MEASURE COSTUMES from £6:6:0 TOPCOATS " £5:5:0 Ladies Own Material Made-up Self -measurement forms and estimates on request. Phone - - - BW 5123 LADIES' TAILORS KING ST. SYDNEY

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
PROGRAMME PRESENTATIONS are often Too LONG [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

PROGRAMME PRESENTATIONS are often Too LONG By Sarabande Probably the main dif- ference between the pro- grammes of the B.B.C. and the A.B.C., is one of presentation. The B.B.C. programmes rarely contain any item or entertain- ment lasting longer than an hour. A GREAT many of them, in fact only run from half-an-hour to 40 minutes. In Australia, on the other hand, the tendency is to make a particular pre- sentation, be it an orchestral concert a musical comedy, a dance night, or community singing, take up the greater part of the evening programme. The latter two presentations invari- ably last the whole night, and the former run from an hour and a half to two hours or longer. One believes that the B.B.C. idea is decidedly the best. It cannot be em- phasised too strongly that the radio is a home instrument, and is used by all the members of the family with com- paratively equal rights. The consequence WHY NOT some |is that one pr0- »HY NOT some |gramme is seldom interesting radio |list...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HIGH HAT Rage Brings NEW Beauty MAKE-UP [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

HIGH HAT Rage Brings NEW Beauty MAKE-UP FOR the effect of these ridiculous "nonsense" cre- ations is often the reverse of flattering. A Bond Street beauty specialist of world- wide fame found that out when she bought her first high hat, and thereupon de- voted herself to a study of the problem. She has now evolved a special "high-hat make-up." in which the main point of focus (usually on a line approximately across the upper lip) has been moved right up to the eyes. In wearing the new fez and checia some Australian women may uncon- sciously have sensed the change and realised the new importance of eye make-up. Women who never nsed eye-shadow in their lives are now adopting it, as well as mascara, or dark ointment, to ac- centuate the lashes. Otherwise the general effect is apt to be insipid and utterly devoid of chic. Rouge, too, must be applied high up on the cheekbones, and not on the lower part of the cheeks. This beauty specialist advocates a "keep smiling" attitude of mind as w...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

Exquisite CUT GLASS of MODERN, GLITTERING BEAUTY.   Lead Crystal and guaranteed       by Angus & Coote.   Just a few articles, selected at random, are illustrated here.   Call in! Our richly stocked cut-glass   department is a pleasure to wander through. Electric Lamp of scin- 19 if. 1Q/6 tillating beauty. Ten               inches tall, complete fsi*»? Charming Cut Latest type square with globe, flex, and VI7 Powder Bowl. cut Jewel Case. .17/6 12/6 35/ Oval Jewel Oval Cut- This handsome oval Toilet Tray is Case, very Glass Perfume just one of a huge assortment in ft deeply cut. Bottle. variety of shapes and prices. China and Cut-Glass in Exquisite Patterns are conveniently displayed on our ground floor. Illustrations gladly posted if you cannot call. ANGUS & COOTE Ltd. 500 GEORGE ST., SYD...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
More Feminine Than Ever! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

More Feminine Than Ever! From Neli Murray, Special Repre- sentative in Europe for The Aus- tralian Women's Weekly. "More feminine and frilly than ever, with masses of organdie,   chiffon, taffeta, and monkey fur, large flower-trimmed hats, and Edwardian parasols!" THAT was the verdict of one of May- fair's foremost dress designers when I asked him to cast his mind a few weeks forward and chat on Ascot fashions. And he proceeded to show me some of the creations which will grace the lawns, ordered by women noted for their smart frocking. One of the most sensational was of stiff black taffeta, built on Empire lines with a narrow tube skirt. It had enorm- ous armholes of monkey fur and a swirl- LONDON. ing flounce applied round the hem. Long, black, taffeta ruched gloves and a pic- ture hat trimmed at one side with a big pink cabbage rose completed the ensemble. Another Ascot model which is bound to attract attention was of pale grey organza (silk organdie), tucked from sho...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SO THEY SAY! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

Being notable sayings by and about women. For the best contribution 10/ will be paid. The source of the quota- tions must be indicated. "BE GOOD if you can and if you want to; be bad if you must and if you pre- fer. But never wear a cloak to cover your real self: whatever you are, be enthusiastic about it."—Anna Pavlova. Prize of 10/- to Miss A. Moye, Parkes Rd., Temora, N.S.W. "MANY WOMEN—some wives—stray from the straight and narrow path through ignorance, but there are those who delight in taking this track because of the pleasure they get, and with them it is not ignorance, for they have their eyes wide open."— Rev. Hugh Paton. "WHEN A little native girl told me the story of the beheading of her mother, I wished that the woman anthropologist who suggested last year that head- hunters should be treated tenderly, had been there to hear it." —Sir Herbert Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of New Guinea. "NO MATTER what the legislation, I myself do not drink anything with alcoholic content...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CHATS ON SHOPS AND THINGS Practice Makes Perfect [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

CHATS ON SHOPS AND THINGS By SAIDE ''This world is so full of a number of things"—and so is this "shopping sleuth's" diary, for knitting competitions, novelties prac- tical and purely aesthetic, and winter sales have left me all of a whirl. Praclice Makes Perfect I SALLIED down to Hordern Bros. on Tuesday to inspect an amazing display of garments. Jaunty sports wear lay cheek by jowl with sturdy cardigans; cosy woollen shawls with dainty wee matinee jackets and bonnets, while I was almost tempted to long for the invalid's couch when I viewed the alluring bed jackets and negligees. Speaking with the authority of a past that has been, as it were, peppered with the adjudication of knitting competi- tions, I pay tribute to the very fine work- manship—or workwomanship?—that was evidenced in each section. Knitted wear has become so popular a feature in our wardrobes that practice has obviously made perfect once again. The wool itself was mostly "Brightella," a Hor- dern Bros.' special, so...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
ACCURATE Hand VALUATION Article 3: Contract Bridge [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

ACCURATE Hand VALUATION Contract Bridge By FRANK CAYLEY WE have seen that accurate hand valuation is only pos- sible when both high and low card tricks are taken into ac- count. If your hand is going to be dummy, and you have decided to raise your part- ner in his suit, a third factor must enter your calculations. This is termed ruffing ability. THE TABLE OF RUFFING ABILITY Counted in dummy only. Blank |Single- | Double   Suit ton ton     Holding 3     trumps . . . 2 Tricks |1 Trick | ½ Trick Holding 4 or more . . 3 Tricks | 2 Tricks |1 Trick Ruffing ability is never counted in the declarer's hand, because such a proce- dure weakens the main trump suit and merely provides a new way of making the same trick. If you find this diffi- cult to understand, imagine yourself as the possessor of A, K, Q, J, 10 of spades. With this suit as trumps, your holding is worth 5 sure tricks, and all the singletons on earth could not ass...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LAST of our Picture Words [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

LAST of our Picture Words NO person can receive more than one cash prize in the popular Picture   Works Competition. This is to give each of the thousands of competitors who have been sending in their entries each week a chance of winning some of the £50 allotted each of the four competi- tions. No. 4. the last of the series, appears on this page. The entry form appears on Page 43. Entries for this last Picture Words puzzle close on July 8. Entries for No. 3 close on July 1. Prize-winners in each of the four competitions will be announced on July 15. Prizes and Conditions The £50 allotted in each competition has been distributed as follows:— £35 will be awarded to the competitor whose solution is correct or most nearly cor- rect. £10 to the second best entry £5 to the third best entry. There is no entry fee, and the prizes must be won. ENTER NOW Look at the series of eight words pictured in the next column. One letter is missing from each word. In each case there is a c...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
NURSING as a CAREER Careers.. for Women [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

NURSING Careers . . for Women as a CAREER While women have invaded many avenues of employment hitherto regarded as belonging to men, they have also en- trenched themselves even more firmly in occupations looked on as their own. In nursing, for instance, the field of work has been widened considerably, and, in addition to ordinary hospital work, there are now opportuni- ties in welfare work, school   nursing, clinics, c o m m e r c ial houses, and   many other avenues. study, and may be purchased from the Government Print- ing Office for one shilling. The general course may be taken at the Chil- dren's Hospital, but an additional 12 months' training in adult male and female wards must be undertaken in order to be eligible for registration outside N.S.W. By our Special Commissioner WOMEN seem to have been socially equipped by Nature for the im- portant task of caring for the sick and injured, and dealing with all the wel- fare work that now comes within the s...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
TRIALS OF THE TELEPHONE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

TRIALS OF THE TELEPHONE The telephone had been installed in the Smiths' house, much to the disparagement of Mother, and the satisfaction of Father. A week had passed, and Mother had been repeatedly annoyed by the usual wrong num- bers, and "May I use the 'phone, I'll give you the money to-morrow." But strange to say, "to-morrow" never came. It was early on Sunday morning, when Father, snoring happily, was dreaming he had won the lottery, had his slumber rudely disturbed by the incessant ringing of the telephone.   Father yawned, reached over, put the alarm clock under his pillow, and prepared to go to sleep again.   Finding the ringing still continued, he   suddenly remembered the 'plione. Still half asleep, Father did not see the Baby's gee-gee, and consequently went sprawling down the stairs, narrowly miss- ing a chair at the bottom. "Hullol" he said painfully. "Is that you, my darling?" came the response. "No," Father yelled heatedly. "But i...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MORE Cash PRIZES for READERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

MORE Cash PRIZES   for READERS Letters of congratulation con- tinue to pour in to the office. They are deeply appreciated, and the many suggestions offered hare been a great help in formu- lating the style and policy of what is intended to be Australian wo- men's OWN paper. THIS week's prize of £5 for the best letter goes to Mrs. Elsa M. Turner, 23 Hurst Street, Goulburn. She writes:— "As a very interested reader, might I make a suggestion? Instead of continuing the prize letter each week, could not this column take the form of a controversy on various subjects that women are interested in? "I would like to state that I have never before read such first-class short stories in a 2d newspaper. The standard you have set is far superior to any woman's paper published in Australia." From now on the first prize of £5 will be awarded for the best letter of 50 words, suggesting a new feature, not al- ready covered by The Australian Wo- men's Weekly, and criticising the paper co...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

GREAT SALE Starts at 9.5 a.m. FRIDAY Be There when the Doors Open! Smartest Sports Coat in Sydney! Look at the price! In all Wool Flannel, note new Cravat Collar in Green, White, Blue, Black, Grey, Flame, Red. S.S.W., S.W., and W. Usually. . . . 29/11 NOW. . . . 17/11 * Creed's Sale Starts Friday To-morrow Creed's start the greatest sale ever held in Sydney! A col- ossal sale of spectacular values and sensational prices ! Be there at 9.5 a.m. sharp for the values of a lifetime ! 430 George St., Sydney. Hunter St., Newcastle. Most Amazing Coat Offer Ever! Coat in Fancy Basket Velour fur Collar, shoulder lining, in all wanted shades. S.S.W., S.W., and W. Usually. . . . 35/- NOW. . . . 15/11 NO MAIL OR PHONE ORDERS FOR THIS LINE.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOUISE MACK'S DIARY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

LOUISE MACK'S DIARY LOUISE MACK'S "Give me my moments: you may have your years!" MRS. NOCK, OF "NEELUNGALOO" AHA! So somebody else has discovered the peace and charm of "Neelunga- loo" and its host and hostess. Across the home-paddock appear the two best known faces in N.S.W. Yes, it's our Premier and Mrs. Stevens strolling to- wards us revelling, for a brief breathing space, in this quiet homestead far from the madding crowd. Last week I promised myself Mrs. Nock, just because it makes me happy to think of that beloved lady, remembering my winter at her dear old homestead. Huge log fires, ice on the water; great flat, endless, greenish plains and a white, rambling, friendly house, with rooms opening right into the plains, the wide, still, fascinating plains that crept up to our front gate, and made us one with eternity while we brushed our hair in the morning. And just fancy finding out there a treasure. A face all tenderness and intelligence combined, a mind that fed itself in the...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THEY'RE in the "SEARCH for BEAUTY" CONTEST [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

THEY'RE in the "SEARCH for BEAUTY" CONTEST Fame and fortune may be waiting at the end of the rainbow for one of these charm- ing people. They are all entrants in The Australian Women's Weekly—Paramount "Search for Beauty" contest, which gives young Australians an unparalleled oppor- tunity of enjoying the best that Hollywood has to give. In (1 ) you see the grave sweetness of Miss Barnes, a Sydney girl (Falk); next to her (2) is a Melbourne girl, Miss M. White ( Dickenson-Mon teath) ; another Sydney girl entrant is (3) Miss Nordstrom (Paramount); (4) is Miss Marjory Sherwin (Broothorn); (5) a Falk study of a strikingly beautiful Syd- ney entrant, Miss Burge; (6) a handsome Broothorn (Melbourne) entrant; and (7) is attractive Miss Jean McBeath (Esler), a Melbourne Varsity girl. The competition closes on July 8. Full particulars are given in the article on page 2.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

THEY ADMIRED HER. HAIR . . . THEY       AGREED   HER   COMPLEXION       WAS   LOVELY . .- IT'S SUCH A SHAME . . . HER. HANDS SPOIL EVERYTHING AND NOW. . . SHE'S EASILY THE DAINTIEST     AND MOST CHARMING     WOMAN AT THE CLUB!     THEY     ENVIED HER FIGURE . . . BUT ! HEH HANDS . . WORK STAINED DIRT GRIMED   HANDS . . FOR THEM. THEY HAD ONLY PITY THEN . . . "USE SOLVOL MY DEAR. . . IT KEEPS YOUR HANDS LOVELY " HANDS THAT THRILL are smooth and white—never stained and grimy. And in spite of all the housework, hands can be soft, white, thrilling. SOLVOL'S thorough   cleansing brings away, grimed-in dirt and stains like magic . . .gives           your hands new beauty. Try it— &a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY THE CAMERA..... [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY THE CAMERA. WOMEN HAVE not seen much of Swedish art, but here is an illustration—a striking statue depicting "precision workmanship," for exhibition at the "Century of Progress" Exposition in Chicago. The sculptor is the famous Swede, Carl Milles. Its powerful simplicity of line makes this statue quite thrilling. THIS LOVELY cup-laden girl is Miss Ruth Madgen. A champion of all beauty champions, she has won eight whistling contests, three bathing-beauty contests, two beautiful-back contests, four beautiful legs contests, one beautiful face contest, one long- haired title, three modeling con- tests, and a horsemanship con- test. But this is not all. She was Queen of one Orange show and four flower shows. Isn't she lovely?   A NEW PAVLOVA comes to enchant the world. Mlle. Aimee Abraamova, a beautiful South American, is now the rage of Paris. This intimate picture was taken in her dressing-room. She is be- coming famed for her striking emula- tion o...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Our Dogs [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

  The dachshund—a sausage on     legs!     Although he is the most joked of dog in Christendom, it is not     the laughter loaded upon him     which has bent his back so low.     His extraordinary acumen tells     him that the fun is quite innocu-     ous. Truly has it been said, "he     is half a dog high, a dog and a     half long, but a man in intelli-     gence." Bred in Germany, his original     work in life was to go down     holes after badgers, for which     occupation his absurdly short legs     become a thing of beauty and a     joy forever. A philosophical hound, he &n...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
ELSA on the ROCKS Nigel being so "devastatingly" eligible, the other maidens in the party looked a little glum, but became resigned and paired off with other swains. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

ELSA on the ROCKS Nigel being so "devastatingly" eligible, the other maidens in the party looked a little glum, but became resigned and paired off with other swains.         Nigel looked hard, and despite their ripening attachment Elsa felt it would be fatal to tell him the truth. —Illustrated by Wep ELSA sat on the side of the iron bedstead in her room in the lodging-house, star- ing down at Kitty Marsden's telegram. So like Kitty, from whom one hadn't heard for quite two   years, to send a wire             like this! She read   it through again: "Do come to-day for long week- end. Will meet 3.45 from Padding- ton. Have got lamb of a man for you.—Kitty." Elsa smiled at the idea of the "lamb of a man" who'd been "got" for her, but the smile faded very swiftly, and depression clouded the lovely, but too thin, young face. There was...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Farewell Meetings To Salvation Army Leaders [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

Farewell Meetings To Salvation Army Leaders Commissioner Wm. McKenzie has re- turned to Sydney from the Salvation Army annual congress in Queensland, especially to conduct farewell meetings to the Army's Chief Secretary, Lieut. Commissioner George Carpenter and Mrs. Carpenter. Mr. and Mrs. Carpen- ter will leave shortly for England en route to Buenos Ayres, where Commis- sioner Carpenter will take command of the Army's work in the Argentine, Para- guay, and Uruguay Republics. The farewell meetings will be as fol- lows:-July 2, 11 a.m., North Sydney; 3 p.m., Rockdale; 7 p.m. Petersham. July 3, the Sydney Congress Hall, 2.30 p.m. (Officers' meeting) ; 8 p.m., final public farewell.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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