ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
EUROPEAN DOG CENSUS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

EUROPEAN DOG CENSUS.     The European dog census has been completed, and shows us that France, with 2,864,000 dogs, holds the European record. Not only are there more dogs in France than any other country in Europe, but there are more per thousand in- habitants than in any other European country. France has seventy-five dogs to every thousand of its inhabitants. Then follow Ireland with seventy-three, England with thirty-eight, Ger- many with thirty-one, and Sweden with eleven. There are 2,200,000 dogs in Germany, 1,500,000 in Russia, and 350,000 in Turkey, though tourists who have resided in Constantinople aver this number falls far short of the actual total, which they think to be larger in Turkey than else- where. In France there is a dog-tax, and every dog is registered—a condition which makes the computation comparatively easy in that country.   The number of dogs in the United States es- timated at from 1,000,000 to 1,500,000. &nb...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MECHANICAL WAR WAGGONS. SUCCESSFUL TRIALS AT ALDERSHOT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

MECHANICAL WAR WAGGONS.     SUCCESSFUL TRIALS AT ALDERSHOT.   The first of the practical trials of the self-pro-   pelled lorries gathered at Aldershot to compete   for the War Office prizes of £500, £250, and £100   for those best adapted to military work took place   early in December over a circular route of 30   miles, in which all kinds of roads had to be nego-   tiated.   The competing engines, five in number, were     brought out into the Royal Engineer's yard at 8   a.m., each with a dead load of three tons on it,   and drawing a trailer carrying a further two tons   behind, and were despatched at about 10-mlnute   intervals in the following order:—Messrs. Foden   and Co.'s coke-fired steam lorry, Messrs. Milnes'   five-ton military lorry, drive...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STOWAWAY IN A BOX. ARTIST REACHES NEW YORK IN A DYING CONDITION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

STOWAWAY IN A BOX. ARTIST REACHES NEW YORK IN A DYING CONDITION. Johann Beck, describing himself as an artist of Budapest, has turned up in New York after a voyage which nearly cost him his life. Johann wanted to marry, and having scarcely enough to support himself turned his eyes to America to gain the wherewithal to maintain a wife. With his small savings he got to Hamburg, where he had himself placed in a box and taken on board the liner Palatia as cargo. He was buried 10ft. deep among a number of stacks of salt, and there he was nearly suffocated. By desperate efforts he managed to break his way through to the top, where he was discovered in a dying con- dition on the steamer's arrival at New York. He had put into his box 24 bottles of coffee, to- gether with other provisions, consisting of bread, milk, and chocolate. The necessity of remaining on the top of the cargo prevented him from get- ting at his provisions, and he consequently had to fast. He was 16 days on the voyage, a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE AMATEUR "CRACKSMAN." FORMER CHIEF OF SCOTLANDYARD AS HIS OWN BURGLAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE AMATEUR "CRACKSMAN." FORMER CHIEF OF SCOTLAND-   YARD AS HIS OWN BURGLAR. In the new number of the "Nineteenth Century   and After" Dr. Robert Anderson, the former chief   of the Criminal Investigation Department at Scot-   land-yard, returns to his attack upon the Eng-   lish system of treating crime and criminals.   Burglaries, he says, are usually committed by   men who are burglars in the sense in which   other men are doctors, lawyers, and architects. "The only difference, indeed, is that in the bur- glar's trade success gives proof of greater pro- ficiency than seems necessary in other lines." Dr. Anderson never realised this, he relates, until one night when he had to break into his own house, having forgotten his latchkey. "My experience of criminal courts had given, me a theoretical knowledge of the business, and it was with a light heart that I dropped into the area ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY QUEEN VICTORIA'S DEATH WAS NOT REGISTERED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

WHY QUEEN VICTORIA'S DEATH   WAS NOT REGISTERED. Although, as is well known, the law requires that the death of every person dying within England and Wales shall be registered within five days of its occurrence, it is a fact that the death of Her late Majesty Queen Victoria has not yet been officially recorded. It is not that the Registrar in the Isle of Wight, whose im- portant duty it would have been to make this unique record, neglected his duty. No; the rea- son for the omission is a somewhat extraordinary one. The Act which regulates the registration of births, deaths, and marriages was passed in 1836, and the second section thereof provided that "it shall be lawful for His Majesty to pro- vide a proper office in London or Westminster, to be called the 'General Register Office,' for keeping a register of all births, deaths, and marriages of His Majesty's subjects in Eng- land." Whether it was an intentional omission or an oversight on the part of the draughtsman of...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
UNCERTAINTY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

UNCERTAINTY. "There is nothing more uncertain than a horserace," exclaimed the man with a tendency to talk loud. And his melancholy friend responded:—"You never bet on a test cricket match, nor worked in a meteorological office, did you?"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Fastest Craft Afloat. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

The Fastest Craft Afloat. The Arrow dashing through the waves at 50 miles an hour. She kicks up a wave   equal in height to the top of the vessel's funnel.     An interesting account of the new record-break- ing craft, the Arrow, that steams at 59 miles an hour, is given in the Christmas number of "Pearson's" Magazine. "A strange craft she is, so crowded with heavy and powerful machinery, that it would seem as though the mighty engines must rend asunder by their throbbing the frail body into the composition of which aluminium enters so largely. If the sea were suddenly transformed into wax, and you were to lift this swift little vessel as you might a toy boat, the basin wherein she reposed would be scarce large enough to hold 50 tons of water—a bulk not much greater than could be loaded on a railway truck—and yet within the limited confines of this diminutive ship is housed a mechanical   giant, whose strength measures 4000 horse-p...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOMETHING NEW IN COFFINS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

SOMETHING NEW IN COFFINS. An American publication, bearing the cheerful title of the "Embalmers' Monthly," states that one of the most curious sights in the United States is now to found at Nevada, and consists of what is known as "Dorsey's Tomb." His tomb is about 10ft. long, 5ft. wide, and 5ft. high. On the top is a revolving stone, cut in the shape of a Bible, which, in turning, can be made to reveal or con- ceal a glass pane. Through this glass pane the embalmed body of a man named Louis Dorsey is plainly risible. The widow, who designed the tomb, used the insurance money on his life to carry out the work. Up to the present time the body presents the freshness of life.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BRITAIN IN SOUTH AFRICA. FRENCH VIEWS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

BRITAIN IN SOUTH AFRICA. FRENCH VIEWS. Mdlle. Alice Bron has contributed to the "Siecle" two articles on her experiences while acting as a nurse in South Africa, first with the Boer forces and subsequently under the British administration. Mdlle. Bron deals chiefly in these articles with the allegations of British cruelty to captured and wounded Boers, and the subject of the concentration camps. In re- gard to the treatment of prisoners she says that, as her attention was solely devoted to the wounded, she cannot speak on the subject from personal experience. She mentions, however, that British soldiers who were wounded, and had come under her care, complained frequently that when they were in charge of convoys, and cap- tured some Boers, the prisoners were given fresh meat, while they themselves had to be content with preserved food. In describing the prisoners' camp at Green Point, Mdlle. Bron points out its excellent position, and the few restrictions imposed in regard to the rec...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A £250,000 CORONET. AMERICAN IDEAS ABOUT THE CORONATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A £250,000 CORONET.         AMERICAN IDEAS ABOUT THE CORONATION. Something like a quarter of a million will be   spent by titled people in the purchase of robes,   dresses, and coronets to be worn at the Corona-   tion service.   Most of this will be distributed among some   half-dozen London firms.   A number of silly stories are published about   the dresses and regalia ordered for the Corona-   tion by certain peeresses of American birth who   have married English noblemen.   According to one journal circulating among   the masses in America, the Duchess of Marl-   borough has ordered a coronet which alone   is to cost a quarter of a million sterling, and   to rival in splendor the crown worn years ago   by the Empress Josephine. &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO "SERVANT PROBLEM" THERE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

NO "SERVANT PROBLEM" THERE. —♦— Norway is not troubled with the servant prob- lem, having an excellent system that reduces the difficulties of the question to a minimum. "Every large town here," writes a corres- pondent in Christiania, "has its domestic em- ployment bureau under municipal management, and all servants are engaged for six months from two fixed periods in the year. "At these times there is a general change of servants by those who are dissatisfied, the bu- reau removing all difficulties by acting as in- termediaries, taking particulars of servants wanted and the situations awaiting them. "Men and women in search of domestic em- ployment go to this bureau, where their refer- ences are inspected, and they are sent to likely employers. "The law protects servants and mistresses equally. All complaints on either side have to be laid before a magistrate, whose decision is final, and a mistress cannot dismiss a servant or a servant quit a mistress until the end of the six mon...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LACE FOR LINGERIE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

LACE FOR LINGERIE. The popular lace of the moment for lingerie is "point de Bruges," which makes beautiful col- lars, revers, and transparent yokes for chemises and "robes de nuits." The smartest models of the lastnamed garment are all designed with elbow sleeves, from which depend four frills of graduated depth. A fascinating example is made in "mousseline linon," with a deep trans- parent yoke over the bust of point de Bruges, which waved itself in a graceful, flown pat- tern over the shoulders and round the back. From the lace shoulders the sleeves are set in groups of tiny tucks, and the full gathered el- bow frills are also tucked and lace-inserted. A very dainty chemise of batiste de sole has a couple of loose lace revers to fall over the top of the corsets. It is quite sleeveless, but front and back of the shoulders are two loops in the lace decolletage, through which are passed pink ribbons, and these can be tied over the shoulders to give the support of sleeves, or simply p...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CRYSTAL GAZING. LADY'S SUCCESSFUL VATICINATIONS ON RACES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

CRYSTAL GAZING.   —♦—     LADY'S SUCCESSFUL VATICINATIONS ON RACES. Mr. Andrew Lang has become an enthusiastic convert to crystal gazing. He describes the process of his conversion in the "Monthly Review" for December, and thus sums up the case: "That crystal gazing in my ex- perience has yielded traces of the existence of unexplored regions of human faculty." What is this human faculty, asks Mr. Lang, which induces pictures of persons in motion and other pictures, weird and wonderful, in a glass ball, a ring stone, a teaspoonful of ink, a glass jug of water, or what not? "Hypnotism is not the explanation. I never studied a crystal gazer who was not wide awake and in the full possession of all his or her normal faculties. The fixed gaze at a glass ball may hypnotise some people, but I never met such a case." It is, however, more often argued that the pictures are merely imaginative readings of the reflections and lights and shadows in the glass...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WORLD. NOT NEARLY OVERCROWDED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE WORLD.   —♦— NOT NEARLY OVERCROWDED.   The world may grow at a much greater rate than at present before there is any danger of overcrowding. On the basis of a thousand people to the square mile, there is room for three times as many people in the world as live in it to-day, and authorities entitled to respect esti- mate that this state of things cannot come about under the present conditions for another 300 years and more. To be "full"—a word which in this sense generally means a thousand persons to the square mile—the world would need a population of 52,000,000,000, and as the rate of increase in the world's population is one person per hundred per year, it will take a hundred years to bring the population up to even 4,328,000,000. There will then be 83 persons to one square mile of earth. Another hundred years will bring the population to 14,706,000,000, or 225 to the square mile; and another century's growth will make it 31,662,000,000, or 609 per mi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ST. BERNARD UP-TO-DATE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

ST. BERNARD UP-TO-DATE.   The famous pass of St. Bernard is now provided with shelters at short intervals, and the good old   dog that used to search for lost wayfarers has   been superseded by a telephone line connected to   the "hospice" in such a way that when a traveller   calls up the "pious monks" they know the shelter   he is at. However, the dog, which the world   would not willingly let die, may still be useful   if the monks can train him to proceed to any   shelter to which he is directed. Even now the pass   is crossed by many persons. Every year the "hos-   pital" receives 4000 to 6000 tourists, 5000 to 6000   pilgrims, and about 15,000 Piedmontese work-   people going to Switzerland to seek work.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Maclean Shooting Case. A SKETCH OF THE HOTEL. BRAVERY OF THE POLICE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

The Maclean Shooting Case. A SKETCH OF THE HOTEL BRAVERY OF THE POLICE. Without going into the sordid and lurid descrip-   tion which characterises all domestic tragedies,   a few facts in connection with the recent shoot- ing case at Maclean, illustrated with photographs, cannot fail to be interesting to all our readers. The principal actor in the drama was James Dowling, at one time an hotelkeeper, but recently living apart from the wife, at whom he fired eight shots in a cold-blooded and determined way. Mrs Dowling, who was staying at the Criterion Hotel, Maclean, of which her father, Mr. D. Byron, is the licensee. The hotel, which is built after the manner of all up-country hotels, is shown in the accompanying sketch, the cross in- dicating the room in which the shooting took place. On the morning of the 9th inst. Dowling re- turned to Maclean by the steamer Kallatina. He was disguised. Immediately on reaching the hotel he went to the room in which his ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IDENTIFICATION OF WOOD. NEW METHOD OF VALUE TO BUSINESS AND SCIENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

IDENTIFICATION OF WOOD.   —♦—   NEW METHOD OF VALUE TO   BUSINESS AND SCIENCE.   The "Identification of Wood" was the title of   a paper read recently before the Society of Arts,   London, by Mr. Herbert Stone.   Mr. Stone's treatment of the subject, said the   chairman. Sir Dietrich Brandis, was an entirely   new departure of the greatest importance to   business and to science—the identification of   wood being made, not so much by ordinary bo-   tanical methods, as by means of sections of the   wood. Specimen sections of maple and of oak   were passed round among the audience, and mi- croscopes provided for the examination of their   structure.   Mr. Stone, the lecturer, explained that in all   the work about European trees, and a certain   section o...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO MORE HYDROPHOBIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

NO MORE HYDROPHOBIA.   It is cheering to learn that for the first time during 51 years not a single human being died (in the year 1899) from hydrophobia in Eng- land and Wales. The same is said to hold good also for the year 1900. Indeed, it would appear that, except in the district of South Wales, the disease of rabies is practically extinct in Great Britain. The Board of Agriculture is naturally proud of this success, which it claims is due to its stamping-out policy by means of slaugh- ter, the muzzle, etc.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MR. REID'S EYEGLASS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

MR. REID'S EYEGLASS.   "Have you trouble with your eye?" a wag once asked George H. Reid. "Not exactly," be replied. "Why?" "I see you always wear an eyeglass," re- torted the inquisitive one. "You see, I get very sleepy at times," ad- mitted the great statesman, with a knowing wink, "and it keeps one eye open anyhow." (Not original, merely adapted.)    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTABLE PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

NOTABLE PLACES. Brief descriptions, properly authenti- cated, of notable places throughout Aus- tralasia, with accompanying rough sketches or photographs, will be accepted by the Editor of "The World's News," and paid for at current rates.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x