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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

Thk Indian Advocate. 29 FACETICE. r '1 - I ",, v In these modern times the sea of life is at high tide. Coming events sometimes cast before them beams of golden light. Unpaid grudges bear a desperate note of interest. Books are the silenti companions of the lonely hours; friends who can never alter or forsake us. x There is always a ready market for good qualities. "I want to employ a stateroom on the Gascogne, " said the big man with the gruff voice; "and remember, young man, my state is Texas, not Rhode Island or Delaware " "What sized letters do you want me to use for the inscription, madam?" asked the marble cutter. "Oh, use the largest you have got," replied the widow, "fie was awful near-sighted." "What's the difference between tact and talent?" "Tact makes a man resign before he is discharged; talent helps him hold on to his job after he's been discharged. "I'ts impossible for me to find bread for my family," said the loaf er. "Same way here," remarked the grocer, "I htfve to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

IP? n K 30 The Indian Advocate. INDIAN NAMES. & V."1 " Hf &.. t fe I fc . ft. r; Yo say tliey nil have pass'd away, That, nobloraco unci bntve; That their light canoes have vanMi'd rom off the crested wiivo; That, 'mid the forests where they roam'd. There rings no hunter's shout; . But, their.name is on your waters. Ye may not wash it out. 'Tls where Ontario's billow , Like ocean's .surge -is eurl'd : Where strong Niagara's thunders wake Th? echo of the world; Whore red Missouri bringeth Ricli tribute from the west; And Rappahannock sweetly sleeps On green Virginia's breast. Yo say their conlike cabins. That clustered o'er tlie vale. . Have disappear'd as wll.hor'd leaves Before the autumn's gale; But their memory livtli on your hills. Their baptism on your shore; Your everlasting rivers speak Their dialect of yore. Old Massachusetts wears it Within her lordly crown; And broad Ohio- bears it Amid his young renown; Connecticut had wieath'd it Where her quiet fjliago waves. An...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

, frrr fp-' ' "Viff? Tim Indian Advocate. 3 M $v whose stiitue he has already purchased, in a place Called Calumet, whither Catholic families go to settle in large numbers, there being at present 50 or 00 communicants. Undoubtedly there is a wide Held open before the energetic pastor and we trust that Almighty God will reward his labors with continued success. Uy a Brief of the S. C. of Rites, dated November 13,1890, Our Holy Father Leo XIII has extended to the Universal Church the celebra tion of the Feast of St. I3ede the Venerable, O. S. B. with the office of the Doctors of the Church. In the Report of the Mission Work among the Negroes and the Indians, Jan. 11)1)0, a strong appeal is made by the Members of the Commission in behalf of the Negro and Indian Missions in the United States. "These two races, the report concludes, are the wards in a special way of their white Catholic brethren in the faith, and as we glory in our claims of being the friends of the destined, and as the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

SWy 1 vt r r-v 32 The Indian Advocate. 4 LEGEND OF ST. ANTHONY. 5 & I.1 . fir: fey." i V- K z ., A Franciscan Father of the monastery of St. Lawrence at 'Naples tellR the following story: v In a peaceful little cottage by the seaside there lived a young . .fisherman and his mother. One stormy night while they were performing their night-prayers, they were startled by a desperate outcry as that of a man in terrible agony. The young man rushed to the door and to his horror found a man who had 'been waylaid by robbers and was now in a dying condition. The rob bers lied; for besides fearing the presence of a witness, they had to escape the hands of the policemen who were on their trail. The fisherman stooped down to assist the dying man, but in a few mo- ' ments more, all was over. The policemen now entering upon the scene and seeing the young man stooping over the lifeless body, captured him as the murderer, congratulating themselves that they ha'd finally succeeded in tracing one ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

The Indian Advocate. 33 before the statue of St. Anthony prayed as only a mother's heart under such circumstances could pray. But her time even here was short, for the sacristan soon came and rattling the keys gave her a sign that it was time for him to close the doors. In her agony the poor mother, who was still holding the document in her hand, threw it over the iron railing calling out and despair ingly: "St! Anthony, you must save my child!" Singularly consoled and quieted, she left the church and went home. It was about 10 o'clock. The King was all alone in his study, looking through some important documents he had to sign. Ue had given his servants strict orders to admit no one as he did not Avish to be disturbed. Suddenly there was a rap at the door, and a moment after a Franciscan friar entered. His appearance was so majestic yet amiable, that the King was charmed for a mo ment. The friar approached the King and. without any embar rassment modestly spoke: "I beg pardon of yo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

irrWQt$wW V v r 34 Thk Indian Advocate. "There is no time to be lost it is true," said the monk, "but I will see that the document is delivered in time, pray just write a few words of pardon here," and the monk pointed with his finger to the blank space where the King was to sign. 'The King did sign, and with a few words of courtesy and thanks, the monk left the room. The whole affair had made a wonderful impression on the King. lie tried to continue his work, but reflecting again, said to himself: How could this man come in here at this hour? He asked the chamberlain and all the servants but nobody had seen anyone enter or depart. They searched but no trace of the monk could be found. The King resolved to go to the monastery early next morn ing and find the solution of this mystery. The scaffold on which the young man was to be executed had already been erected and the poor young nn:i in his cell was ex pecting his executioner to enter, when the doors of the prison opened and inste...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 35 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

mri"V "TT" f 'r"' Tjfv "WlfFff-TTOPTWVf - " WWL", V J7n2T"?V ' The; Indian Advocate. 35 t OBITUARY. Died in Lehigh, Ind. Ter., on March 8th, Sister Felicit as, 0. S. B. young in years but full of good works and merits. R. I. P Died at St. Mary's Academy, S. Heart, O. T., on March 7th, Nel lie Wano, an Indian girl, aged 17 years. She received the lasti Sacra ments, and was well prepared for death. For the past ten years, Nellie attended the school of the Sisters of Mercy, and proved herself to be an industrious, generous hearted pupil. Owing to her persevering efforts, Nellie was admitted, last October, to the Academy; in delicate health, she had since then been gradually sinking until the end came. Tiie funeral took place, at 10 a. m., March 8th. "Tbero is a reaper whose name is Death, And, with his sickle keen. He reaps the boarded grain at a breath, And the flowers that grow between." 4 ' Longfellow. LOCALS. 1. Washington's Birthday, Feb. 22nd, was fittingly celebrated by the stud...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 36 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

'-- - it 36 Thk Indian Advocate. 0. Anions our visitors during the past month were: Messrs. Points and Lovett, superintendents of the contemplated Choctaw ex tension 11. R., to Denison, Tex. There are at present two surveying camps in this neighborhood, working under their direction Mr. ; " JBeebe, U S. Post-office Inspector, of St. Louis Division, accompanied - by his wife. Mr. Davis and friends of Lexington, O. T. Mr. Paul Baldwin and Christie Ille of Lexington, Superintendents of a Com pany formed for the purpose of developing copper mines said to have been recently located in the vicinity of S. 11. Traveling men are calling at S 11., almost daily, foremost among whom of late were A. Sehnert of Ft. Smith, representing A reus' Hard ware Co.; Mr. Pennybacker, of Upp & Co., Wholesale Grocers, Purcell, J. 1ST. Maxwell, representative of a house in Memphis, Tennessee; Mr. McMican, of Shawnee: Mr. C. U. C. Van Anterest, traveling for the Alton-Davis. Mercantile Co., Oklahoma City, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 37 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

,V, ".T'Ts.""' 1ff'7?1,.',fT "' . A J , ;s - 'T.HK Indian Advocate. 37 TEGUMSEH. Oklahoma Territory is divided into 23 counties. Pottawatomie county, in which S. II Abbey is situated, is in the extreme S. E., cor ner Its area is 501,000 acres; population 22,594. Its Southern boun dary is the South Canadian river and its eastern the Seminole Nation. Little River runs across the county from K. W. to S. E. Along the North Canadian are the wide bottoms, famed for their fertility and beauty. The county is about equally divided between timber land and prairie. Tecumseh is the county-seat; opened to settlement Sept. 23, 1801, when fully 20,000 people made the run for town lots, its popula tion being- now about 2,000. It is a most beautifully situated city, cen trally located and doing- a thriving business. There are four weekly newspapers. The little mission church, "Our Lady of the Holy Ro sary," is regularly visited. by Rev. Germanus Guillaume, O. S. B. pastor of Shawnee, O. T. Two of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 38 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

'TTfffVT' -!. -f -,-, -, -.-rWn, .- -r,, TJT fcv 1 ' ' 38 Thk Indian Advucatk. - c . "'. " " ' (APPENDIX.) PREFACE. ' ' The life of St. Benedict has been written, once for all, by his disciple, Pope St. Gregory the Great. It forms the 2nd Book of his Dialogues. St. Gregory, it is true, wrote many years after the death of the holy Patriarch, his spirit ual father; yet, as he himself tells us in -the Introduction to the second book, all the facts which he relates, he had from four witnesses, the immediate companions of St. Benedict, one of them, indeed, Constantinus, who was his successor as abbot of Monte Cassino. The present sketch is nothing but the life and miracles of Str, , Benedict by St. Gregory, changed from the dialogis tic into the ordinary form of a narrative, and from which I have eliminated certain details that, although most valu able in a theological and ascetic point of view, are not in teresting to the general reader. At the end of each chapter, I have added remarks ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 39 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

Thk Indian Advocate. 39 " i . .. , , . . . head before the combined force of evangelical example and . supernatural power." (Pref. to Abbot Tosti's An Historic al Discourse.) We hope that this short L,ife of St. Benedict may con tiibute to make the holy Patriarch of Western Monasticism better known and better loved, and to revive devotion to. him in this country among the faithful children of the Cath olic Church for the honor and extension of which, he him self and his disciples of the Benedictine Order during 14 centuries, have labored so much, so well and so successfully! LIFE OF ST. BENEDICT. His Birth; His Flight From Rome; His First Miracle: Faith and Charity. St. Benedict was born in the province of Nursia, of honorable parentage, and brought up at Rome in the study of Humanities. Seeing that many of his schoolmates, by reason of such learning, fell into dissolute life, and fearing lest he likewise might be seduced, he resolved to forsake his father's house and wealth, to fle...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 40 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

m 5'?Tf7WWWW .T Chk Indian Advocate '' K tf.1 , tants of the town, and they determined, in their admiration, to hang it up at the Church" door for a perpetual memory 'how greatly God's grace did work with Benedict upon his first renouncing of the world. The sieve continued to hang there many years afterwards, even to the times of the Lom bards. Remarks: The name Benedict or Bennet is derived from the Latin word Benedictus, meaning Blessed, "blessed by grace, and blessed in name," (St. Greg.) He was born in 480 A. D., according to the most common opinion. His parents were Euproprius and Abundantia, and the name of his nurse was Cyrilla. They lived in Rome, where the paternal home of St. Benedict became later converted into a monastery with a church called St. Benedict in Piscimda. All earlier writers are agreed that St. Benedict, when he left his father's house, was in the 14th year of his age; Ab bot Tosti, however, is of the opinion that he was perhaps in his 20th. Enfide was a sma...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

, "1 THE R; iff i ADVOCATE Vol. XII. July, 1900. No. 4. SUMMARY. T. JOSEPH'S care of the Indians. ( Poetry. ) The Seminoles (continued.) Facetioe. Gleanings of two Benedictine Missionaries through California; (End) Medal of St. Benedict. Sacred Heart Abbey (con tinued.) Benedictine News. General News. Distribu tion of Premiums in Sacred Heart College. st. Joseph's care of the Indians. Gre.it people! now pressed by the famine that proud infidelity made! Poor exiles o'er river and prairies in search of Old Glory long strayed! Hehold your mother, the Catholic Church! Ah bravely lo her bosom fly! 'Tis better to live in "the old Church;" 'tis better in her faith to die. There you live happy, contented though you many crosses surround There you pray by the graves of your fathers, who sleep in sanctified ground. True, good are tho. Catholic customs, far better than yours of old; No longer be strangers midst Christians, whose God is your Messiah foretoldl God's blessing be upon you, great p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

93 The Indian Advocate. THE SEMINOMAS (Continued.) tHK Indians had set the American government at defiance. The slaves of Southern states continued to run away, taking- refuge with the exiles and Semi noles, the slave holders of Georgia became more clamorous than ever. The Spanish crown could not protect herself from the invasion of the Americans when in pursuit of run away negroes. She had seen her own subjects massacred, her forts destroyed or captured, and her rights as a nation insulted by an American army. In 1819, by a combination of force and negotiation, Florida was purchased from Spain for $5,000,000. Thus the Seminoles were brought under the dominion they so much dreaded. Slave holders once more petitioned the United States for aid in the capture of their escaped property. The United States, failed in their treaty with the Creeks, now recognized the Seminoles as a distinct tribe, and invited their chiefs to meet onr commissioners and negotiate a treaty. The Seminoles agree...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

s The Indian Advocate. 94 f tion for the Indians was submitted to the chiefs. After, much persuasion, a few of the tribal leaders were induced to visit the western country. They found the climate, cold, and a land where "snow covers the ground, and frosts chill the bodies of men" and on general principles, Arkan sas a delusion and a snare. The chiefs were told they might go and see for themselves, but they were not obli ged to move unless they liked the land. In their speech to the Commissioner they said: ''We are not willing to go. If our tongues say 'yes', our hearts cry 'no.' You would send us among bad Indians, with whom we could never be at rest. Even our horses were stolen by the Paw nees, and we were obliged to carry our packs on our backs We are not hungry for other lands we are happy here. If we are torn from these forests our heart-strings will snap." Notwithstanding the opposition to a treaty, by a system of coercion, a part of the chiefs were induced to sign, and fifteen...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

95 The Indian Advocate. the United States troops, committed depredations upon the whites, bloody tragedies occurred, and the horrors of the Second Seminole War was chronicled through the land. It was now that the young- and daring warrior, Osce ola, came into prominence. He had recently married the daughter of an Indian chief; but whose mother was the de scendant of a fugitive slave. By slave-holding laws, the child follows the condition of the mother, and Osceo la's wife was called an African slave. The young warrior, in 'company with his wife, visited the trading post of Fort King for tj$e purpose of buying supplies. While there the young wife. was seized and carried oif in chains. Osceola became wild with grief and rage, and no Knight of cava lier"' days showed more valor than did this Spartian Indian ,in the attempts to recapture his wife. For this he was arrested by order of General Thompson and put in irons. With the cunning of the Indian, Osceola affected penitence and was re...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

The Indian Advocate. 96 'HI h detailed to lead them. The slave was well acquainted with the Indians, spoke the Seminole tongue fluently. The affair of Dade's Massacre is without a parallel in the history of Indian warfare. Of the 110 men, who, with flying- flags and sounding bugles merrily responed to Gen eral Clinch's order, but two lived to describe in after years the tragic scenes. One was Private Clark, of the 2d artil lery, who, wounded and sick crawled on his hands and knees a distance of sixty miles to Fort Brooke; the other was the negro slave, who escaped without a wound. This slave, Louis Pacheo by name, shared the fortunes of Wild Cat known also as Coacoochec, in the Indian Ter ritory. Subsequently, with his followers, Louis among the number, Wild Cat emigrated to Mexico. But the old slave returned to Florida in 1892 and died in Jacksonville, Florida, January, 1895, aged 95 years. The tragic news of the Dade Massacre convinced the United States that war was commenced in r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

97 The Indian Advocate. before, viz: That the chiefs would not enter into an agrees ment that did not guarantee equal rights to their allies as to the Indians. Official documents show that General Jes sup agreed that "the Seminoles and their allies who come in and emigrate west, shall be secure in their lives and property; that their negroes, their bona fide property, shall accompany them west, and that their cattle and ponies shall be paid for by the United States." The Indians, un der these terms, now prepared to emigrate. History records that even Osceola avowed his intention to accom pany them. Every preparation was made to emigrate, and a tract of land near Tampa was selected on which to gather their people. Hundreds of Indians and negroes en camped there. Vessels were anchored to transport them to their new homes. Peace was apparent everywhere, and the war declared at an end. At this point a new difficulty arose. Slaveholders became indignant at the stipulations of the treaty,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

The; Indian Advocate;. 98 Marie a woman very small in stature, and with high , . cheek-bones. Osceola lacked this peculiarity, and was very handsome. The admixture of Caucasian blood, stimulated the am bition of Osceola's Indian nature; his book learning", to gether with the teachings of nature, made him able to cope with the most learned. Living until he was almost twelve years of age in the Creek confederacy of Georgia, his youthful mind received deep and lasting impressions from Tecumseh's teachings. To these teachings, as well as the blood he inherited from his Spartan ancestors was due, no doubt, his supremacy in the Seminole war. In the manner in which he led the Seminoles may be seen the influence of the great Shawnee. Osceola's power was in this strong personal magnetism; he swayed his warriors 11 1 1 1 , c 1 -1 -i 1 j r wixn a iook a snout oi command proaucea an eieciric ei fect upon all. He was a hero among his people, he was feared and dreaded by our officers. In this day...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1900

99 The; Indian Advocate. the whites," at the same time drawing" his knife and sticking- it into the table before him. The cause of this out burst was that the stipulations of the treaty guaranteed no protection to the allies. He was arrested for his insolence, but was released on a compromise. His vengeance became more terrible than ever, an in defiance "Yohochee" echoed through the woods and "war to the knife" was resumed. It was now that the daring chief made the bold and well conducted assault against the fort at Micanopy. A short time after, the savage hero performed a piece of strategy before unheard of in the annals of wai. Sur rounded by two armies of equal strength with his own, he carried away his warriors without leaving a trace of his retreat. That host of Indian braves melted out of sight as if by magic, and our disappointed generals could not but agree that a disciplined army was not adapted to the work of surprising Indians. They were learning to recognize the characte...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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