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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

LAST WEEK WE OFFERED YOU MAYFLOWER = SHARES = At $1.00 Per Share And we duplicate the offer in this issue. TAKE PARE You do not wait too long, for we are liable to advance the price of stock to $1.50 per share at any time, as we have just added The INDEPENDENCE AND WASHINGTON CLAIMS To our holdings, and if the ore in the tunnel holds up until we reach the 150-foot mark we will be justified in increas ing the price. The ore in the shaft is increasing in value, and you may see Mayflower stock go to $5.00 ■ PER SHARE AT ANY TIME Send today the coupon attached herewith and receive FREE our book, "The Story of the Mayflower.". Address: COUPON 1 MAYFLOWER tend the "Story of the Mayflower" T.__ I MINING AND MILLING CO. Town__ 1327 WESTERN AVENUE, st*.. — SEATTLE, WASHINGTON THE RANCH 11

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

12 THE FIELD The Beet Sugar Industry. . A report on the progress of the beet sugar industry in 1903, prepared by Special Agent Saylor of the depart ment of agriculture, shows that there was an increase in the number of beet sugar factories in the United States during 1903 from forty-three to fifty six. According to the report the beet sugar crop of 1903 amounted to a lit tle more than 2,000,000 tons harvested from 242,576 acres, the average yield being about BV6 ton." to the acre. The prices which the farmers received for beets from the different factory com panies ranged from $4.50 to $6.50 per ton, the average being nearly $5. The average gross returns to the farmers were, therefore, $42.50 per acre. The estimated cost of growing beets by irrigation is $40 per acre, and in sec tions where irrigation is not necessary $30. If $35 be taken as the average for the whole crop of 1903, the average net profit to the farmers was $7.50 per acre. In some of the sugar beet areas the returns w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

LEGAL NOTES R. J. BORYER This department la open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free ln these columns. If a reply by letter Is desired enclose a fee of On* Dollar to R. J. Boryer, care The Ranch. Alien Ownership of Lands. The ownership of lands by aliens, other than those who in good faith have declared their intention to be come citizens of the United States, is prohibited in this state, except where required by inheritance, under mortgage or in good faith in the ordi nary course of justice in the collection of debts, and all conveyances of lands hereafter made to any alien directly, or in trust for such alien, shall be void; provided, that the provisions of this section shall not apply to lands containing valuable deposits of min erals, metals, iron, coal, or fire clay, and the necessary land for mills and machinery to be used in the develop ment thereof and the manufacture of the products therefrom. Every cor poration, the majority of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

14 LIVE STOCK Going Back to the Sheep. N. E. F. Every branch of live stock husband ry has its eras of prosperity and its cycles of depression. The evolution of local conditions forces changes in the animal industry. Circumstances will make one branch of live stock better adapted to a given locality than another. The "golden fleece" was once the leading desideratum in keeping a flock of sheep, but today the market value of the carcass is the object achieved. The desirability and pro fitableness of different breeds are weighed, as the goal to be reached is mutton, or a combination animal rep resenting wool and mutton. For many reasons there has been a great transformation in localities that forty years ago exploited the sheep industry. The flocks have disappeared, and cattle and horses have filled their places. The old flocks were largely Merinos descended from the Vermont, New York and Ohio stock. They were of light carcass, but grew a heavy fleece of fine wool that sold in the 60's ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

entific methods of selection and pur chase of wools now prevailing over those in vogue in the past will result in establishing a different scale of prices for lime dipped wools and those dipped in scientifically compounded dips that will not injure the fiber nor cause the objectionable results speci fied above." The foals which have been suckled by their dams until now may be weaned by putting them in a box stall or tying in the same stall with the mother and generously fed. There is no better market for skimmed milk than in growing horseflesh. Good brood mares usually give milk in such abundance that the foals will not taste the milk until forced to it by partially withholding water from them and placing skimmed milk before them morning and night. They are obstin ate about drinking for a day or more, and then there is no more trouble on this score. Care must be taken to ob serve the effect of a foal's diet at weaning time, there being some dan ger from indigestion and constipation....

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

16 You Don't Have to U ELIEVE WHAT WE SAY! We don't ask you to. We only want to call your fi • v''^^^"|jt:'* Mi^^^^^^\ ** attention to a few facts regarding the TUBULAR SEPARATOR, and you can Ij l^gSmAmaW^fw J '"' 'v' • : '*%i A*"* out for yourself that what we say is so. We claim that the Tubular is much l^^^raW^fl^^"vS's^s'•' :a^\ easier to run than any other make. Now prove this by turning the crank of any / 'lt|p'"^fFv^ll V- ■'■ .'( other kind, and then that of a Tubular of similar capacity. You can tell which E-^Be^ You want the easiest running kind. We claim '•'; "^bS^SBSB^S^-^^ ~:/i>_^/ . j that the Tubular bowl is easier to cleanse than any other make. Make the agent of \*. SvM^lK*^SPwßHm^^^W*''" ' any ELIEVE WHAT WE SAY! We don't ask the parts We on a want to call your D attention to a few facts regarding the TUBULAR SEPARATOR, and you can find out for yourself that what we say is so. We claim that the Tubular is much easier to run than any other make. Now prove this by ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

. . -t_-"-"- - • - "-"■-* .. • -1*. ..*.■.*..*." * . VOL. XXI. NO. 20. Big Money for Poor Advertising A correspondent of the Tacoma Daily News, writing from St. Louis, gives a dispassionate criticism of Washington's exhibit at the big Fair, and it would be well that the article be read well and digested in the state's progress. The principal points, to our mind, made by the correspondent, .ire con cerning the matter of publicity. Re ferring back to the Chicago World's Fair, the writer notes the fact that Commissioner Blalock, Edward S. Meany, Percy Rochester and other prominent people.. of the state kept the people aware of their presence and doings through the columns of the press; by entertaining and being en tertained, and "losing no opportunity in keeping Washing ton's prestige in the foreground." And he adds: "At similar fes tivities here- (at St. Louis) Washington is barely represented and frequently not at all." For the first time in print the names of at tendants for Washing...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

2 EXPERIENCES All subscribers are invited to write for this column. For each accepted article we give 30 cents, either in subscription or advertis ing. Make your articles brief and write as often as you like. To prevent Mice Gnawing Trees. One of your subscribers wishes to know how to prevent mice gnawing small fruit trees. I would recommend wrapping with tar paper or tin. Take a sheet of tin and wrap around the tree, but not against it. Press .the tin into the ground and have it as high as you think advisable. Gen erally a good soaping of the trees will keep the mice from gnawing them, and also clear of worms. I am a reader of The Ranch and like it very well. Enclosed please find 50 cents for my year's subscription.— Emlen Hampton, Chelan County. Homemade Mutton.Now that the meat strike is on the farmer who has a flock of sheep to draw on for his meat supply, can snap his fingers at the butcher, and also be sure that he is eating no "embalmed" meat. It re quires no great amount of ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

THE RANCH Office: 38 Downs Building. MILLER FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor, Associate Editors: F. WALDEN. H. L. BLANCHARD. Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month. Subscription, In advance, one year, SO cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. Seattle subscribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue Is received from th. subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find It on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. „_,_ Falling to receive the paper regularly,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES The editor of this department has been laid on the shelf for the last four months on account of a broken arm. His right arm is yet on a strike and this writing is done wholly with the left hand. It is to be hoped that there is nothing sinister in his motives or matter even if the writ ing is done with the sinister (left) hand. How words grow away from their original meaning. With the an cient Romans the word sinister meant the left hand or side while dexter de noted the right. But what a man did with his left hand was supposed to be done cunningly, hence sinister now is applied to tricks of cunning 'or deception. * * * The writer has received many testi monials of sympathy in his affliction with a goodly share of appreciation for what he has been furnishing in these columns. Thanks, friends, but I don't think that I care to break another arm in order to find out who are my friends. If a man does his work faithfully and well he will have his friends. He will hav...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

as the Northern Spy or Duchess of Oldenburg. In Cold Storage.—ln the spring of 1896, in one of the largest cold stor age houses in St. Louis, some of the very choicest apples examined were a number of barrels of Rome Beauty which had been grown and packed in an orchard in Southern Illinois. The fruit was fresh, crisp, juicy and finely flavored. The time of observation was about April Ist. We are satisfied that more depends on picking, packing and storing the fruit at the right time than is commonly supposed. Pick when hard, firm and fairly well colored and place in first-class cold storage at once, and if the storage is properly managed we fully believe the Rome Beauty will be found to be an excel lent keeper and a first-class market able apple. Origin of the Rome Beauty.— the Ohio state horticultural report for 1889, page 207, may be found the fol lowing: In the fall of 1816, Mr. Joel Gillett moved from Marietta, Ohio, to Law rence county, and settled in Rome township. He brought w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

6 THE DAIRY Farm Separator and the Creamery. In the last issue of the Dairy Record J. O. Emerson, an experienced but termaker, is referred to as one of the advanced buttermakers on the ground that he does not object to receiving cream from hand separators, but rath er encourages the farmers to bring it. In so doing we do not know but that Mr. Emerson is one of the many •who sees what is coming—the cream ery business carried on entirely with the use of the hand separator, but in order to be successful he will have to make one step further, or perhaps rather two steps, viz.: to refuse to take milk, and insist that the cream must be delivered at the creamery at least every other day. Under the pres ent conditions which prevail in most dairy sections, with but few excep tions, the hand separators are more of a curse to the creamery than other wise, as in order to be successful a creamery must either have all whole milk or all cream. Many of our best buttermakers in sist that they cannot...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

from the udder to the cream vat. This indirect effect from pasteurization should commend its introduction as much to those interested in pure milk and dairy products as the direct ad vantages gained from it by its capa city of destroying germs. Possibly in time some other means may be found to obtain these purposes, but until then proper pasteurization is the only practical method as far as dairy pro ducts are concerned. Preservatives in Milk and Cream Never Permissible. After Dr. Wiley's condemnation of borax it is needless to say that the use of any chemicals in milk for con sumption is absolutely criminal. Even in countries where the use of chem icals is permitted in other dairy pro ducts, milk is the only article except ed. Strange to say, cream has not been considered of equal importance, though it is so commonly used fo> children and invalids. The cream trade, especially for ice cream, is very uncertain and changeable, and fre quently large quantities of cream are held in s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

8 HOUSEHOLD —-—— MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Communications for this department may be sent to Mra. S. C. Butcher. Ellenaburg. Wash., or direct to The Ranch. All quea tlona will be carefully answered; contribu tiona for publication are welcome. Care of the Broom. Many housekeepers, who are eco nomical and careful of most articles pertaining to the household, abuse their brooms shamefully. A broom may be made to last much longer if properly cared for. In the first place, select a broom which is made of fine, even straw, of a greenish tint. That which is yellow had be come dead ripe before it was har vested or broken. This will gener ally be found coarser. Be sure that the brush is a natural green, and not colored. When sweeping, do not push the broom ahead of you, but draw it towards you in even strokes without bearing heavily upon it. Keep the brush level upon the floor, as leaning the broom handle towards you bends the brush over and soon it has all run to a sharp point at one side, making ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

Ur^BliHlj^^i^'^jl^i^^^^P^ff^^^^^^^^^^PsiSi^ffl^^^P^ The Emerson Piano Co. began the manufacture Jg^g^g^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ai^lKJflSiiiliaflß^lßßßJp^^ of pianos in 1849—55 years of successful business record goes to the credit of the great Emerson fac- Wr^B^^^S/iiuitl— nl'!?X^iw^^ * MlSn<! ' These beautiful Pianos are sold all over this coun- PBbMB!3iBg-L^JJM^^^»aBBM^MBWHBBBBBiS^* f~"':'' * mtmHk These beautiful Pianos are sold all over this coun ifl|yBW - r.'.'i'iii'iiuijTmmTr**^"|*|^J^ ■JngfjT i^ ■ try by the strongest dealers in every section. Even Bi^^*^^iiiaß^^Si^SHHßißMßßM^H^l^TOßfl^^ John Wanamaker, the prince of merchants, has ar jHfl&l[^JH||Hßß|||| 1 1 ranged to handle the Emerson Piano in his mam- Hißffy ' W^BKKSH/lIIIIIII^^K^ m;t / moth New York and Philadelphia stores. We have flfln iffffißM|l|P!Pf^l^^ II /in our warerooms in Seattle all the styles manufac §llf| ' BB^a^wS^ffii^^^^B^S^^Bßß^MHE^^^lMßKr' II I tured by the above company, which we are selling Oliyl BB^^^^^pS^...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

10 POULTRY ■ H. L. BLANCHARD ———— Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. The Pure Bred Business Hen. F. Q. White. One of the questions continually asked by those thinking about trying to make poultry profitable is: "Would I not be just as successful with com mon fowls as with purebred or fancy stock?" If not, why? There are sev eral reasons why it pays to keep purebred hens. First, your flock is uniform, and you can give the feed and care that your variety needs. With common mixed flocks you are feeding some hens fat, while others may not get what they need. Your chickens are much evener if all one kind, and if you are selling for broil ers to a fancy trade, you would see a difference between a crate of nice purebred Wyandottes or Plymouth Rocks and a crate of red, white, blue and speckled scrubs. It might easily make a differenc...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

LAST WEEK WE OFFERED YOU MAYFLOWER ams mm mm mmm mmm amm mm mm mmammammm mm — ■■'*-; = SHARES = SsW smmWmk SS HBvVr -•a-OvS iKJt. •) JJv I •,1-A:'vi U-., :::.>,;■;. v, • s;.; : . : /.v; ;; •;,.,S; v- At $1.00 Per Share v"vv . v - - . , :r -\ . v-.-.v -» -/.v. ■* vv: Xi ' SS- . •' ■..';".■./.'_ SSS.S;V;:.Ss ' v;vV^;. ; :,-v ; :V- 0 And we duplicate the offer in this issue. • ■-. .•••-':-• ■■;*.■■■ .- ■■■■'•■■■'*;.'. I- ■■'. "- . - *.* •-; *: *« - ...•.«.•■ . * . „-..*•■ ; ; i . ... TAKE CARE You do not wait too long, for we are liable to advance the price of stock to $1.50 per share at any time, as we have just added The INDEPENDENCE AND ■ ■■ m* mm mWW warn w ■■ ■m\ maw WW ■ m mmw aaa arm mm WW lIII^UIIIATAII AI Mt I AAA WASHINGTON CLAIMS To our.holdings, and if the ore in the tunnel holds up until we reach the 150-foot mark we will be justified in increas ing the price. The ore in the shaft is increasing in value, and you may see Mayflower stock go to ;-^~v;V -sTs."" s"-'S>' v...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

12 LIVE STOCK Condimental Stock Foods. There is no use disputing the fact that condimental stock foods are com ing more and more into use by the stock feeders of this country. Not withstanding the opposition to them from certain high quarters, stock foods are meeting with a larger sale every year. This being true, it i 3 well that we should look into the mat ter and discover if we can why they are increasing in popularity. We dare not assume that the hundreds of thousands of farmers and stockmen who are using stock foods are fools who are being "worked" by a lot of swindlers, writes M. Purvis in "Breed ers' Gazette." We have no reason in the world for not thinking that a large number of these farmers are intelligent, progressive, careful and observing and we must assume that they feed stock foods because they are convinced of the usefulness and of the profitableness of using them. In the first place the name given these preparations is an unfortunate one. We do not know why they are...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

sion why they fed a certain stock food and their replies were identical. As one man they said, in effect: "Be cause it makes our stock eat better, fatten better, finish in better shape and makes our feed go farther." The writer in every case stood by the side of these men when these state ments were made, saw the stock to which stock food was being fed, had an opportunity to gauge the intelli gence of the men and note their sur roundings. In every case the farm ers making these statements were in te ligent men who read, think and keep posted on agricultural progress. Can we believe that all these men, some of whom had used the scales to confirm their belief m the value of stock foods, have been deceived and deluded; have been persuaded to waste money on something that is unprofitable and of no use? Consider ing the men, their surroundings and seeing their stock, I am compelled to believe that condimental stock foods have a place in the dietry of live stock where they may be of use a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1904

14 Notes for the Sheepman. The chemist can balance no ration that will be universally beneficial or adaptable to all members of the flock, for the reason that individual animals have different temperaments. Mr. Baker, a Washington county. Idaho, rancher, lately lost 300 head of sheep in a stampede by their piling one upon another in their mad rush down a narrow gorge. Mr. Webb, an Oregon rancher, re cently lost 400 sheep from vegetable poison while grazing them on Cuddy mountain on the Idaho border. A Chicago stock yards buyer who has lately corralled 60,000 mutton lambs for that market, recently said to some of his Idaho lamb selling cus tomers who were not quite satisfied with the prices: "If you want better prices raise big Hampshire and Ox ford lambs like those being shipped by the Butterfield company and I'll raise the price a dollar a head." The Wood Live Stock company, of Idaho, have recently added to their flock holdings 25,000 Montana ewes, presumably for cross breeding wit...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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