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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

May 1992 Scams: Ask for proof before allowing work or repairs Groups of people passing themselves off as contractors and home repairmen at the expense of elderly and rural people already have been observed this spring by the Virginia Department of Commerce. Residents are urged to be cautious of phone or door-to-door solicitors offering drastic discounts on home improvements or repairs, including driveway paving or sealing, house or barn painting, insulation, septic tank cleaning or repair, termite inspection and related repair, foundation or basement waterproofing and linoleum fkxjring, to name a few. Scams in which the contractor offers free material or discounts because material is left over from a nearby job happen often, said Investigator M. Wayne Brown. To intimidate victims into paying for incomplete work or fraudulent charges, the con artists often threaten to sue. In some cases, barns have been spruced up with paint that washes off after a few rains and May 8: Virginia Poult...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

4 Handle with care Foodborne illness is no picnic w SB I Sf SHARING SECRETS with SHIRLEY estimated 1 million cases of foodborne illnesses per year? This sounds like a tremendous number, but let's think about what we can do to lower the incidence. Some foods are naturally more hazardous than others. The definition of hazardous foods include any ftxxl that consists in whole or in part of milk or milk products, eggs, meat, poultry, fish, shell fish, edible crustaceans or other ingredients including synthetic ingredients which support rapid and continuous growth of infectious or toxigenic microorganisms. These are the culprits in a high percentage of the foodborne outbreaks. Simple precautions can be taken to avoid this problem. The old adage, keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold is more than an adage. It is absolute fact. This must be done, and done properly, if someone is going to avoid foodborne illnesses and consume safe food. With the picnic season already here, it is most import...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

May 1992 lake five: vegetables, fruits linked to well-being NewWellness for Farm Bureau Jeanine M. Sherry, M.S.,R.D. President, New Wellness Inc. It is called 5 a Day—for Better Health The goal of the national 5 a Day program is to encourage people to increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables to five servings a day as part of a low-fat, high-fiber diet to help reduce cancer risk. NCI estimates that up to one-third of all cancer deaths may be related to what we eat. These health messages are being communicated to the public through cooperative projects and promotions conducted between fruit and vegetable growers and suppliers, commodity boards, retailers, and state and local health organizations Large national companies such as Dole and Del Monte are including the 5 a Day message in their advertising campaigns, while progressive supermarkets are offering educational programs and materials right in the stores. On average, Americans now consume about 2.5 servings of produce d...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

6 First lady addresses Farm Bureau Women It has been another busy month for Farm Bureau Women. Northern District Chairman Mary Anderson, Central District Chairman Joanne Burkholder and I, along with Sandy Bennett, manager of Women's and Young Farmers' Activities, enjoyed the 10th Annual American Farm Bureau Federation Southern Regional Multi-State Conference at Little Rock, Ark. in early April. The highlight of the conference was a surprise visit from Barbara Bush. She was on the campaign trail, as she put it, "to talk about the best qualified presidential candidate.'' We were fortunate in hearing many informative speakers. Steve Kopperud, senior vice president of the American Feed Industry Association, gave a legislative update on animal care and animal rights. Dr. Mark Heiman, a scientist for Eli Lilly, shared his experience in the Adopt-A-Scientist program. As you know by now, Agriculture in the Classroom is off and running in Virginia with more than $11,000 in donations to the p...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

May 1992 I 0 I CHy children wplorc few life ao * | —-nr I - ft. «f -*— * * ,' na fc , the fidß Commissioner ofAjitenHiw Clint- V.T„m.r. 1 ___ — dairy * H* h ™ bw4, " , ' tto!S,W " * 'k, Art imm *•"« h « W pUIW ** \ i Wl^ 6 in a petting bam set up (or the day. 1 I __ 1 ..bids,»tud«nts jijjW«*•* M * U '**"""* ~ I At the turtey house, -hich holds ".000 hateWin 9 s a " "** * ( „ ist cuddly the soft f*» 1 AM M w#a *A, ** *f «•* * vitrt,B — I in *u« A revs efluipweitt shop/ a Wi 9 I sssSi s- «• jjß w HE as a *m— At lunch the visitors were asked ™" k a " I On. ,iH W**** - * *— r '" Ul "' At th« ShenarvloaKs WJe plant, whaw «i«k ft»m A W I Wk«• milk,**» A **' f - Ll |-^,«*» d...:' H. "W^ 4 "' MCt * M ' I the state. influeMe on ojricutture... as county administrators I .Ut. in *as* ,* - «■» -- —■ " aV nJ need „ k „ ow *. Mfe nutrmous *d *, * Jm m »r in "A,s„ n,an »- — " Meh a>y ,rts on their tabK' he said. fit — «A Above, right, Corey Whisnant gently lifts a young turkey for .^H c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

8 Healthcare Coverage npn " # Many are no longer able to afford medical insurance because of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! If you are not already eligible for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Virginia group coverage. Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums Does Your Virginia Farm Your Current Policy Provide? Bureau Coverage Policy Coverage $5,000,0000 Medical Coverage? You can receive up to $5,000,000 |»r in lifetime benefits for covered services. I - ; "~>vit L____ Ar» Annual Out of Pocket Limit ~ The Maximum you will personally pay in , ** 1 any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, (for option I) Dental Coverage Included J? ''!" |7| Coverage for restortative and preventative dentistry. Prescription Drug Card o |v'jv, : Reimbursement for your prescription drug charges. Just show your card. —— Accidental Injury ■. 1 nT...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

May 1992 Herbs are a gardening fad which may not fade From watching gardening magazines, nursery catalogs, craft outlets, and local garden centers over the past few years, I would have to say that interest in growing and using herbs is still flourishing after making its re-entry into the gardening scene about 10 years ago. Why the continued popularity? I think it's because nearly anyone can try their hand at herbs and be somewhat assured of success. Herbs are generally undemanding plants which can fit into whatever space you have available. They adapt to a vegetable grower's plan about as easily as they do in a patio gardener's or even an indoor gardener's scheme. Some herbs have ornamental value in the landscape as well, so they have been added to the flower gardener's palette. Although herbs are primarily grown as seasoning for food or for preparing beverages, herbal enthusiasts span far beyond cooks and canners. Those interested in folk medicine, herbal cosmetics, and natural dye...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

10 Shad planking a spring tradition; Ruritan project since '49 (Continued from Page 1) The Ruritans stress in their printed history of the event that it is not held to promote candidates or causes, though many leaders of the commonwealth have addressed the crowds. Only in recent years have women attended the planking. This year, Attorney General Mary Sue Terry, the first woman to speak here, talked about changes in government. "At no point in recent American history has the assumption been so widely shared that government is part of the problem and not part of the solution for some of the most fundamental issues we face," she said. That's not so say, she continued, that there are not good people in government working in hospitals, taking care of roads, teaching children and serving in elected and appointed offices. "It is to say, that there is a growing sense among many people that we have lost our way, lost our sense of balance and perspective, lost our values, or at least have the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

May 1992 ANGUS—'Vfearling registered bulls. EPD's & Pedigree avaiabte Sired by R & J Spade 1204, Premier Independence, Whitehal Pulsar & P S Sasquatch 904. Reasonably priced. Cal Ken Whitlock, manager, 804-633-5931; Trent Boieman, herdsman, 804-633-9823 or Holly Hill Farm Corp. 804-633-7527. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN buds. Service age. Also open heifers. 703-825-0590. SEVERAL YOUNG JERSEY and Jersey-cross cows, some with calves. Amherst, VA. 804-933-8968. REGISTERED GRAY BRAHMAN cattle for sale, gentle. Diamond B Farm, Powhatan, VA. 804-794-1209. BEEFMASTER—Bred beefmaster heifers, young heifers, young buls. Louise Evans, 703-682-4457. PURE AMERICAN BUFFALO—heifers calves, yeartngs and bred cows. Delivery possible. Craig County. 703-897-5786. BULLS—IO Angus for rent or sell. Graperidge Farms, Box 115, Goochland, VA. 23063. 804-784-5145. REGISTERED ANGUS, cow/calf pairs and buls, AmeSa, VA. 804-230-2324 after 5 p.m. POLLED HEREFORD BULLS with goo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

\ ' K' ' §|S fc* la| \ * * ' ■°v : A*-;'-•: *■ '■* . ..if v|, *--; ' V'' ;> VW 51,W °' 4 i—, ■ ,^ vaceorwße '* A8 * Gl!acut " ' ■"* • Taking a cat-calf nap A tabby cat slept peacefully on the back of a snoozing calf uriti excited young voices woke them both. They opened their eyes to a shed ft* of seventh-gradera from Richmond who teamed about term Ife up close on an Augusta County dairy and poultry term during Virginia Agriculture Week in March. See Pages 6 and 7 for more on the urban chMdrsn's field trip. spring***

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

it 11 | 'i '|Ij'i ;I' V. I: K ''i ! / (I I i • ! / / ! ; ■ ' ■. j /•- {J(/I!iIi j { J \ m. v I . *. A ? y \ \ x v \ .tl Vol. 51, No. 5 Solving the mysteries of food pyramid not so hard By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Edttor The food pyramid. It sounds like a restaurant where the waiter dresses like an Egyptian and —in that awkward flathanded, angle-armed pose—tries to balance your food. Actually, the food guide pyramid is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's attempt to help Americans get a balanced diet. The' 'basic four'' food groups used since the 1950s are as out of date as mummies. The pyramid going up in classrooms and on refrigerators gives us five food groups from which to choose, with grains making up the bulk of a day's diet. Fruits and vegetables are separated and given more emphasis now. There's a sixth category —fats, oils and sweets —to use sparingly. And wouldn't you know those temptations sit at the pinnacle of the pyramid, topping it off like frosting on a ca...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

2 Lien law changes to affect residential properties By ELAINE R. JORDAN Effective June 1, Virginia's mechanic's lien laws pertaining to residential properties .will be drastically changed. During its recent session, the Virginia General Assembly made several changes to laws affecting developers, contractors, owners, lenders and title insurance companies. As background, lenders on new construction projects require title insurance for mechanics' liens. Recently insurance companies have incurred significant losses for liens filed against residential properties. The usual defense that payment by an owner to the general contractor extinguishes the rights of subcontractors and suppliers does not apply in the case of residential construction when the developer is also the owner. Purchasers of newly-constructed homes from an owner/developer may have been required to pay twice. In 1991, the title insurance industry approached the General Assembly with specific proposals to terminate lien rig...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

June 1992 June 1-30: Summer Harvest at Museum of American Frontier Culture, Staunton. Help bring in mid summer grain harvest and related activities. 9-5. Call 703-332-7850. June 10: Orchard meeting at Jenkins Orchard, Sperryville. Contact Thomas Williams, 703-675-3619. June 10: Virginia Sweet Potato Board meeting, Onley. Contact J. William Mapp, 804-787-5867. June 13: Clean the Bay Day, shorelines of Chesapeake Bay, 9-noon. Call Robert Dean, 804-427-6606. June 13: Workshop for Small Food Entrepreneurs,.Richmond. Contact Joseph Marcy, 703-231-7850. June 13: Dairy Days, Valley View Mall, Roanoke. Sponsored by New River Valley Dairy Club. Contact Cecil King, 703-980-5395. June 13-14: Virginia Quarter Horse Breeders/Virginia Quarter Horse Association Show, Virginia State Fairgrounds, Richmond. 804-228-3200. June 15-17: Three-day conference on quality and economics of apparel. For merchandise managers, apparel firm trainees, quality control directors and inspectors, retail buyers and oth...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

4 Extension head retires Sept. 1 BLACKSBURG—After two years of controversy, the director of the Virginia Cooperative Extension decided he wants to focus on some favorite projects instead. Dr. James F. Johnson announced he will retire Sept. 1. He joined Extension in 1961 and served as Extension agent in Greensville, Isle of Wight and Southampton counties. Among the interests he will pursue will be rural development projects, he said. Johnson came under fire last spring when farmers objected to a proposal to consolidate some county Extension offices into regional centers. Extension later chose to simply add ' more regional duties to many agents' jobs. Several rounds of state budget cuts stripped Extension of staff and left some county offices vacant. That problem was capped by a proposed 812.2 million budget cut in Gov. L. Douglas Wilder's blueprint for the 1992-94 biennium. While $ 5.8 million was restored to Extension s budget by the 1992 General Assembly, another battle is looming ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

June 1992 Ag education, wetlands media lunch features A teacher speaking at the State Women's Committee Media Luncheon April 29 said, "Something lights up in children's eyes'' when they learn about modern farming. Fourth-grade teacher Robin Davenport of Woodstock Elementary School at Virginia Beach told reporters about the importance of Ag in Classroom. He brought along two students, one now studying the unit and another who had completed it, to testify that the program is a favorite with children. Davenport said the curriculum is good, but that the field trip to a farm "just nails everything together." Most of his students had never been on a farm before. He said the majority of his students are three generations removed from the farm. The teacher stressed the importance of bringing agriculture to the students, who, in turn, take agricultue to their parents. He complimented the Farm Bureau and Women's Committee for its efforts in promoting the farmer's story and wished us much succ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

6 Say cheese! It's loaded with protein and calcium What better way to celebrate National Dairy Month than by enjoying the great taste of cheese? More than a gallon of milk goes into making one pound of cheese, so it's loaded with protein and calcium. In fact, each ounce fihuirtftfnllrinrrrr IMCWWCIIIiCSS for provides about 200 milligrams of calcium—2s percent of the Adult Recommended Daily Allowance. The exceptions are cream cheese, cottage cheese, Neufchatel and Brie cheeses which are much lower in calcium. It's important for people of all ages to get enough calcium. Children require calcium to develop strong bones and teeth. But, since bones don't reach their maximum density or thickness until about age 30, it's crucial to keep calcium intake adequate. After age 35, the bones start to lose some of the calcium that keeps them strong. Dietary calcium, along with regular exercise, can help replace that loss from the bones. If your diet lacks calcium over a period of years, you may be...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

June 1992 Milk: From a family farm to your table i I 9HHT^JgCJKJra 1 Hpßl pi 9 PVH| •- " ■ . «l!^n»K «*W H^B T^rx /. dmlnKamm y< . \ \\ \\ . jaa By SHIRLEY W. WALTON Appomattox Extension Director It is early morning at Hix Dairy where we see that early to bed, early to rise really is the name of the game. We are visiting a beautiful dairy farm in southeastern Appomattox County which is operated by two brothers, John W. and William D. Hix, and their four sons. The sons of John and his wife, Florence, are David, Jim and Tom. William and Glenna Hix's son is Danny. Asked what is the most rewarding thing about being a dairy farmer, Tom Hix replied, "I don't have to drive to work and I can't get laid off." This is an extremely important advantage when you think about people living in densely populated areas like Tidewater and Northern Virginia during recessionary times. The Hix Dairy provides one of our most nutritious products in the human diet—milk. This delicious drink gets ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

8 Healthcare • Many are no longer able to afford medical insurance because * * r of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! If you are not already eligible for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Virginia group coverage. Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums Does Your Virginia Farm Your Current Policy Provide? Bureau Coverage Policy Coverage $5,000,0000 Medical Coverage? , - + I , You can receive up to $5,000,000 in lifetime benefits for covered services. An Annual Out of Pocket Limit The Maximum you will personally pay in any one year is $1,000 plus your deductible, (tor option I) L.—__J r - Tr - Dental Coverage Included Ajt Coverage for restortative and preventative dentistry. Mr Prescription Drug Card Vhkjf\ [ Reimbursement for your prescription drug I Wp charges. Just show your card. I Brf ifp -11 ' | Accidental Injury Pays 100% not subject...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

June 1992 County resolutions committees need members' opinions by June 30 Farm Bureau is your voice Farm Bureau policy is your policy! The policy development process begins July in counties across the state. Tb help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues that affect you, take a few minutes to look over these issues of importance to agriculture. The following questions pertain to such vital topics as agricultural research, biotechnology, commodities, environment, health, import quotas, land use, labor, zoning, and many others that affect farmers in indirect ways. Your needs and opinions will be considered in forming policies that are voiced in Virginia's General Assembly and in Congress. • Answer only those questions that concern you. • Check or fill in answers where appropriate. Number and write longer answers on a separate sheet of paper. •Mail or take your responses to your county Farm Bureau office by June 30. Policy Development Calendar July 13-July 23 —District Poli...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1992

10 Opinions (Continued from Page 9) EDUCATION 29. Would you support a constitutional amendment which would allow elected school boards to be granted fiscal autonomy? □ Yes □ No 30. Should localities be required to provide public transportation for non-public school students? □ Yes □ No 31. Should parents have the choice as to which school their children will attend? □ Yes □ No VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 32. Do you find that there should be vocational education representation on the State Board of Education? □ Yes □ No LABOR 33- Should employee benefits be expanded for migrant and seasonal farmworkers? □ Yes □ No 34. If so, please be specific. 35. What should we do about harassment from the Legal Services Corp. ? 36. Should Farm Bureau support legislation which would require employers to provide leaves of absence for employees for family related issues? □ Yes □ No LAND USE PLANNING AND ZONING 37. What should Farm Bureau's policy be toward a statewide master plan? 38. Do you generally suppo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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