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Title: Grenville Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE SMALL SOLDIER. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

THE SMALL SOLDIER. Dr. Pembrey, medical adviser to the Army Medical Committee, lectur ing in London on "Tall versus short men for the Army," said it was an official fallacy that tall men made the better soldiers. From the scientific point of view there was no advantage to the tall man over the short man. From a purely mechanical point of view, the small man had advantages which the big man could not claim. In endur ance also the small main had the ad vantage over the big man. A tall man was to be estimated by the average height of his own coun trymen, else a typical Scot might be considered a tall Welshman. Ac count must be taken of racial charac teristics. The Welsh were a capable race but short, and anatomical data, all else being equal, were in favor of short men. The brain was relatively greater in short than tall men, and small men were more active and agile. Tall men were more amen able to discipline, short men being more aggressive and more pugna cious.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ORIGIN OF ARMY BANDS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

ORIGIN OF ARMY BANDS. The present high standard of Brit ish Army bands is entirely due to the efforts of the late Duke of Cam bridge. . After peace was declared at the end of tiie Crimean War a per formance was given at Varna, in tlie Crimea, by the massed British bands there at the time, with results so painful that the Duke set to work at once to provide a proper training for Army musicians. He enlisted a large number of officers in favor of the scheme, and with the money they subscribed he took over Kneller Hall, Hounslow, once the residence of the famous painter, Sir Godfrey Kneller, and established there the Military School of Music. For nearly twenty years the Duke carried on the school without any Government help, but in 1875 it was officially recognised, though it was not until within the last four years that the officers were relieved of the burden of supporting the bands of their regiments. Great Britain is the only country which undertakes the systematic training of its A...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Soldiers Yet! IF YOU'VE GOT IT IN YOU! [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

Soldiers Yet! IF YOU'VE GOT IT IN YOU! What wiU vou do when the troops come hack, Aud are marching through the street ? When the cheers ring out with a nation's pride At the sound of their tramping feet ? What will you feel when you see the tears For those who have bravely died ? For honor's sake, aud to right the wrong, They have crossed the Great Divide. Fcarle?s, they looked in the face of Death, For a cause that is fair and true ; Tbey gave their lives for the Empire's sake— Will the same be said of YOU ? What will you think in the time to come, When your chance has slipped away, And regret for all you might have done Will haunt you for many a day ? t For the sake of those who have fought and died, In your King and country's name, Gome, play the MAN, ere it be too late, And take a band in the game. Mary L. Wyatt. Little River.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What She Was Thinking About. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

What She Was Thinking About. The wife of a well-known novelist is an excellent housekeeper, but a matter-of-fact woman, who has lit tle sympathy with her' husband's poetical fancies. He was reading to her a fine pass age which he had just written, and was not a little surprised to find that she stopped her knitting, and seem ed lost in thought, as he read sen tence after sentence. "John James," she said, as soon as he had ceased reading, "you must put on another pair of stockings to-mor row morning; I see that those you have on need darning." Those who are getting what they have not earned are not all either employers or employes. The object of all ambition should be to be happy at home. If we are not happy there we cannot be happy elsewhere. It is the best proof of the virtues of a family circle to see a happy fireside. \

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BIRDS IN WAR. How They Save Lives. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

BIRDS IN WAR. How They Save Lives. A sailor recently stated that sea gulls are very useful for betraying the whereabouts of a submarine. When the birds discern a periscope they rise in a flock from the water's surface and circle around it, uttering shrill cries. This performance at tracts the attention of the crew of any neighboring ship, which gener ally results in the submarine being discovered. Whilst seagulls are unconsciously aiding sailors, parrots are carrying out equally useful work for soldiers. It has been discovered that parrots have an extraordinary faculty for an ticipating the approach of aircraft. Before an aeroplane has come within range of the human eye, the feather ed alarum becomes violently agitated and shrieks incessantly. There are a number of parrots in cages on the top of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, whose duty consists of giving warn ing of the approach of hostile air craft. For many years caged canaries have been used in mines for the pur pose of betraying da...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FIGHTING WITH WATER. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

FIGHTING WITH WATER. When the Belgians opened the sluice gates and let the sea into the basin of the Yser River to stop the German troops in their desperate attempt to advance along the coast from Ostend to Calais, they placed an obstacle in the way of the invading army ■ that was apparently decisive in turning the issue to the advantage of the Allies. This means of defence is not new. It has been used repeatedly by the peo ple of Holland for stopping or destroy ing an invader, and in one case—that of the siege of Leyden, 1574—the cut ting of the dykes resulted not only in the relief of that city, but in the drowning of thousands of the invad ing Spanish army. There seems lit tle doubt that the flooding of the Yser basin in the early days of November, 1914, was the direct cause of an even greater loss of life than occurred at Leyden.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What I Saw in Rome. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

Mr Carlyl'e Smythe, the well-known Australian writer and entrepreneur, left •Sydney for England on a Dutch boat .■some four months ago. During the voyage the German submarine blockade •vas declared, and the Dutch captain took no risks, but landed his passengers at an Italian port. Mr Smythe went im aiediately to'Rome and for a month lived iti the midst of the Political Camp, visiting at iniervals most of the principal •owns in Northern Italy. What he saw ami heard daring this sojourn he tells -Jty readers of " Life," in the July issue —just published. It is a wonderfully ■:-.teresting and informative article, for it als not only with the attitude of Italy • iC with the possible movements of the i'ulkan States and of Holland. This is the first of a series of articles •"■■it Mr Smylhe will contribute to ■ Life" from the War Zone, the second, ■ scribing "Paris To-L)av," being al »dy on its way. Mr Smythe, will ;• ivel through Prance and Belgium—or ich of it as is available—and " Life "...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Smythesdale News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

• A meeting of supporters of the Red Cross movement took place on !7tb insfc. ; Mayor M'Meaamin presiding over a good attendance. The secretary sub mitted a statement of receipts and ex penditure in connection with the recent concert, showing receipts to be £27 12s 8d, and expenses £1 5s 2d, leaving a credit balance of £26 7s 6d. Included in this amount were donations of £2 12s from Boyd's Hydraulic Company, and £1 Is from Humble's No. 1 plant. It was unanimously agreed to forward -the full amount to Miss M'Donald, secretary of the Red Cross Society, Ballarat. The chairman moved a hearty vote of thanks to all those who had contributed to the success of the movement. This was supported by Dr Vise, who tendered a special vote of thanks to Miss Furness, who had contributed a handsome tray cloth, which she had raffled for the sura of £1 17s. The following were suc cessful in winning the different articles : —Bottle of scent, Mr Chas. Walker ; tray-cloth, Miss Rene TraSord ; picture, Mr ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fruit Growing. THE SCARSDALE DISTRICT. MINISTER'S VISIT OF INSPECTION. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

THE SCARSDALE DISTRICT. MINISTER'S VISIT OP INSPECTION. The Miaister of Agriculture, Mr Hutchinson, accompanied by Mr Car mody, fruit expert, paid a visit to Scars dale on 18th inst., at the invitation of Mr J. Chatham, M.L.A., to discuss with the residents the desirability of es- , tablishing a nursery to demonstrate the value of the local Crown lands for the production of fruity especially apples and pears. Mr Chatham explained that as the mining industry was at a low ebb he thought that the waste lauds in the bor ough could be turned into profitable orchards, which would support a large population. It was only a question of ways and means. The Mayor, Cr Daniel, said he was pleased to welcome the Minister, and hoped his visit would result in good. The district was capable of growing apples-and pears fit for any! market in the world. He quoted in stances of fruit trees planted upwards of 35 years ago, and though now id a neglected state, were still bearing fruit in abundance. The b...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 26 June 1915

For Bronchial Coughs take Woods Greiu reppcroaiut Cure, la 6i

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Snake Valley News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

Oar little township has already given one of its sons to the Empire, in the per- 1 son of Private Harold Baxter, who, we 1 regret to hear, has been reported killed 1 at the Dardanelles. The young soldier 1 was the second youngest son of Mr J. H. 1 Baxter, and was only 21 years of age. i Prior to enlistment he was employed in the Railway Department at Melbourne. < The bleak conditions of recent days have proved very severe ob stock. The i high prices charged for feed are beyond 1 the reach of many. The appearance of the crops is very promising, and should 1 the conditions continue to be favorable 1 a bountiful harvest is assured. . !

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

A. Fisher, the Prime Minister,' states that he does not see any difficulty in the way of the Compulsory Voting j Bill which the Government intends ! shortly to introduce into the Federal ■parliament. He expressed the opinion that there was a general agreement in the view that such a measure was ^needed. Some Federal members . think £that the overwhelming defeat of the Den ham Ministry in Queensland was due in a measure to resentment against the Compulsory Voting Act which was brought into operation lot the first time in tljsait State. \ For Bronchial Coughs take Wooda Great Peppermint Cure, -Is 6d

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mining News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

Last week the Scarsdale Company cleaned up a milling for a yield of 156 ozs. of gold. Compared with the previ ous month, this shows a reduction of 28 ozs. The average, 4^ dwts. per ton, is sufficient to meet working costs. The winze from the 275ft. level has been . sunk 14ft., and is showing a full face of stone of payable quality. There being still stone on the hanging wall side a crosscut is being run out to test it. At the 200ft. level the south drive on the flat make has been extended to 133ft. The etone is 15in. .thick, and payable. A stope ou the west side shows the vein to be 18iti. thick, and payable. In the stopes over the 275ft. level the average width of the lode is 2£ft. At tho 3STew Jubilee the crosscut for the lode at the 1100ft. level is driven to 854ft. Stoping is going on as usual at the 700ft., 800ft., and 900ft. leyels.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Shire Severance. CR. KENNEDY'S PROPOSAL. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

CR. KENNEDY'S PROPOSAL. The following is the text of a letter sub mitted to the Skipton Progress Associa tion by Cr T. Kennedy, of Granville Shire, in which he: proposes a scheme to sever the township of Skipton and the parishes of Skipton, Borriyalloak and Galla from the North riding of the Shire of Hampden, and constitute the area a riding of the Shire of Grenville The proposal pat forward is to sever the township of Skipton and other parishes, which would then become a riding of Grenville Shire. The district would be represented by three council lors owning or occupying rateable pro perty within that area, who would, under the Local Government Act, have con trol of the revenue derived therefrom. Ah Outsider, looking at the map show ing the boundary of the various municip alities, would wonder at Skipton and district beins; attached to the Sbire of JTampden, with its official centre at Camperdown (42 miles away), when the office of the adjoining municipaity was only 12 miles off. ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, For coughs aiid colds ucver fails, Is Gd

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Boy Who Didn't. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

The Boy Who Didn't. "Please, air," said the office boy, "may I get away this afternoon?" "What's wrong?" asked the great financier. "Is your grandmother dead?" Little Willie had been taught that honesty was always the best policy. He was a good boy. He never sneak ed stamps from his employer, and he never threw the pretty typewriter in to fits by whispering to her that he had just seen a mouse scoot under her desk. Being a truthful boy, little Willie replied:— "No, sir. I ain't got no grand mother. But the club that's at the head of the League is going to play here to-day, and I'd like to see the game." The old gentleman stared at him helplessly for a moment, and then drew from his pocket five shillings, which he handed to the boy. Ah; reader! You have already guessed that the great man felt in duty bound to encourage such frank ness—but wait. "Here," said Henry Hardrocks— "here's your week's wages. Don't come back any more. A boy that can't get up even a poor excuse on such an occa...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sporting Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

B* HOTSPUR. To-day (Saturday) the Y.R.O. Grand National programme will be opened and with good weather the attendance and sport should be excellent. Both horses, previously named by me as having good prospects. in the Grand National Hurdle, have gone amiss ; and now, tak ing Clontaft, Wingarara, Wisconsin, and Dyor to provide the winner. I will place Wisconsin 1st; Clontaft 2nd; and Wingarara 3rd. Other events Maiden Hurdle—Aboyne or Jallau dur. Iramoo Welter—Dumfries or Ham burg Belle. Maiden Steeple—Bricks of Goshen. Myross Handicap—Vibratory or Gy nong. 3 Winter Handicap—Meritas or Bal Blair.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Where His Art Failed. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

Where His Art Failed. From all over the world congratula tions have been showered upon Ma dame Sarah Bernhardt upon her re c very from the serious operation which she underwent recently. The famous actress is fond of tell ing an amusing story of a certain great actor who possessed a: marvel lous power of mimicry. He could imi tate the voi.ce, gestures and facial ex-' pression of any person whom he hap pened to meet. Although he earned big money, he was always very hard up, and one day he visited his tailor to ask him for a little more time on an account which had been owing for three years. While he was there, a customer enter ed the shop and paid for several ar ticles which were immediately de livered. Then the actor heaved a deep sigh of pain. "What is the matter, monsieur?" asked the tailor. "Alas!"- replied the actor, sighing again. "There is a man I shall never be able to imitate!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

For children's hacking cough at night, Woods' Great Peppermint Care,' If 6d

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BURNS ON THE GERMANS Scotia's Bard Hits Off the Huns. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 July 1915

_ —I BURNS ON THE ; GERMANS S I Scotia's Bard Hits Off the Huns. The opinion of Robert Burns on the Germans is of extraordinary interest at the present moment. We are some times inclined to think that all the sins of the Teutons date from modern times. That they were held in utter detestation over a hundred years ago by Scotland's national poet is a re markable- fact. ' , Burns had too wide a view to rail in Pharisaic fasnion at his fellow-man. His condemnation, therefore, has all the more force. In a letter written to the Rev. Dr. M'Gill, of Ayr, he ad mits his incompetence to express his detestation of the Germans. He states: "ignorance, superstition, bigotry, stupidity, malevolence, self conceit, envy—all strongly bound in a massive frame of brazen impudence. Good God, sir, to such a shield, humor is the peck of a sparrow, and satire the pop-gun of a schoolboy!" That is fairly strong language, but stronger is to follow. The letter proceeds: ' "Creation disgracing scelerats such a...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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