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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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"LA REVANCHE" AGAIN. FIERY SPEECH BY GENERAL MERCIER AT NANCY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

"LA REVANCHE" AGAIN.         FIERY SPEECH BY GENERAL   MERCIER AT NANCY.   Not content with proposing schemes for the   invasion of England, General Mercier is now launching defiance at Germany. Speaking recently at a meeting of the Ligue de la Patrie at Nancy he concluded a fiery   speech with the following moving words:— "Nancy is an outpost of defence in the next war, and the Eleventh Division, the iron divi- sion, must show its vigilance to those who were the adversaries of yesterday, and who will be the enemies of to-morrow. "Nancy is animated by the sacred fire of pat- riotism. Our country is agitated by an echo which murmurs from the other side of the Vosges, by the regrets and hopes Of our bro- thers of Alsace and Lorraine."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WIRES AND FIRES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

WIRES AND FIRES. The "Electrician" states that a proposal has been submitted to the municipal authorities at Rouen, by the chief of the fire department, for the utilisation of the tramway trolley wires in connection with the extinguishing of fires. All the principal thoroughfares of the town are pro- vided with electric tramways, and the proposal is that pumps capable of being electrically driven, should be installed in a number of suitable posi- tions on the tramway route, to be switched on to the trolley wires, so that the pumps may be used as occasion necessitates. The proposal is said to have been favorably received, and is now under the consideration of the authorities.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GOOD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

GOOD. "I conclude that's a fly," said the smart young trout. "You are right, my dear," said its mother, "but never jump at conclusions."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FRENCH SUBMARINES. SCORE ANOTHER SUCCESS IN NAVAL MANOEUVRING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

FRENCH SUBMARINES. SCORE ANOTHER SUCCESS IN NAVAL MANOEUVRING. Yet more successes are attributed to French submarines. A recent telegram from Cherbourg to the Eng- lish papers says that at the moment when two coastguard vessels, the Valmy and the Bouvines, were returning to harbor the submarine Norse and the submersible torpedo-boat Narval received orders to leave port immediately and attack the coastguards on their way home. The attack was carried out with perfect suc- cess, for, says the "Temps" correspondent, the captains of the Valmy and Bouvines had not the slightest idea of the approach of the submarines till both the coastguard ships had been tor- pedoed. The submersible torpedo-boat Espadon under- went her official trials the other day at Cherbourg without a hitch, at a speed of nine and a half knots.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PARIS TO NEW YORK. BY AN OVERLAND ROUTE. AN UNIQUE EXPEDITION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

PARIS TO NEW YORK. BY AN OVERLAND ROUTE. AN UNIQUE EXPEDITION. Mr. Harry de Windt, the well-known explorer, on December 7 left Paris on an expedition of some magnitude for the "Express." It is an attempt to make an overland journey from Paris to New York via Siberia, Behring Straits, and Alaska. Mr. George Harding, who has accompanied Mr. de Windt on all his previous journeys, had already proceeded to Yakutsk, in Siberia, where he will get together dog and reindeer teams and await Mr. de Windt's arrival. On leaving Paris Mr. de Windt travelled by the Trans-Siberian railway direct to the terminus of Irkutsk. Thence he proceeded to Yakutsk, a distance of 1300 miles, involving a three weeks' sleigh journey. Arriving at Yakutsk early this month, Mr. de Windt was to join Mr. Harding, who would then have in readiness the impedimenta for the long journey to Behring Straits. A fortnight will be spent at Yakutsk, and in the third week of January the two travellers will proceed north-east ove...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LORD ROBERTS FLOWER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A LORD ROBERTS FLOWER. An attempt is to be made in Great Britain to associate a South African flower with Lord Ro- berts and his triumphant entry into Pretoria on June 5. A well-known English authority on horticultu- ral subjects, Mr. Sampson Morgan, states that the flower in question is the ixia. The South African origin of green ixias, which grow wild on the veldt, their Irish color, and the fact that they flower at the beginning of June, have caused some enthusiastic admirers of Lord   Roberts to resolve that they will try to popularise the flower both in South Africa and in the United   Kingdom; and in Guernsey, where it has been in-   troduced and flourishes, growers are planting   large quantities to send over to London next   "Roberts Day."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MOTHER'S INHUMANITY. BURNING A BOY WITH A RED-HOT POKER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A MOTHER'S INHUMANITY. BURNING A BOY WITH A RED-HOT POKER. Elizabeth Blake, the wife of a butcher, was   charged at the Bristol Assizes the other day with   ill-treating her son, a bright little fellow aged   eight years.   It was stated for the prosecution that the   woman was addicted to drink, and that on October   31 she sent the boy to a publichouse for some   beer. On his return she drew a red-hot poker   from the fire, and said, "I've got this ready for   your father, and as I can't burn him I'll burn     you." She then took the lad by the shoulder,   and drew the hot poker across his lip and chin,   and across his throat, burning him severely. He   shrieked with pain, whereupon she broke a framed   picture over his head, causing two cuts, and after-   wards she beat him ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MATTER OF ETIQUETTE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A MATTER OF ETIQUETTE. "Why don't you move out of the sun, Tommy?" "I was here first." —"Westminster Budget."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Australian Burglar and French Actress. A PROPHETIC PLAY. THE MYSTERIOUS MAN WITH THE DAZZLING TEETH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

Australian Burglar and French Actress. A PROPHETIC PLAY. —«— THE MYSTERIOUS MAN WITH THE   DAZZLING TEETH.   (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.)   LONDON, December 6.—The trial of the Aus-   tralian burglar, Henry Gilmour, for the attempt- ed murder of Madame Kolb, which occupied the   Paris Assize Court last Friday and Saturday, was just one of those cases over which the   Frenchman, and especially the Frenchwoman,   gloats. With the horrors of terrible wounds   were commingled plenty of spicy scandal about   the victim's life and reputation. A strong   flavor of mystery as to a lover-accomplice,   and a soupcon of suspicion against distinguish-   ed personages.   With the criminal charges of burglary and   attempted homicide was combined a civil action   by Madame Kolb claiming one franc dam...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HISTORICAL DISTINCTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

HISTORICAL DISTINCTION. Wallsend (Eng.) has hitherto been noted for its supply of excellent coal, but it will in future enjoy an historical distinction of which it is vastly proud. The town has received the first munici- pal charter signed by King Edward VII., and the new corporation came into existence in No- vember. Wallsend is an ancient place, and de- rives its name from the position it occupies at the eastern extremity of the great Roman Wall, the north fosse of which may be traced even now.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Boer Long Tom. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

The Boer Long Tom.     General Walter Kitchener inspecting the remains of the Ladysmith Long Tom, which caused Sir George White and his gallant garrison so much trouble.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COLD WET NOSE. HOW BINGO CAME BY IT. THE CORRECT VERSION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A COLD WET NOSE. HOW BINGO CAME BY IT. —♦—   THE CORRECT VERSION.   "E.M.W." sends for this week's issue the   "correct" version of how Bingo (illustrated in   last week's "World's News") came by his "cold   wet nose." Here it is:—   "On the first night of the Ark's eventful voy-   age, Noah's peaceful slumbers were disturbed by   his son Shem announcing the alarming fact that   water was rushing into the vessel.   "A brief examination disclosed a hole in the   port side of the Ark (it was not a port-hole),   just about the size of a young orange with its   skin off. The skipper's alarm for the safety of   his floating Zoo was great, and in stentorian   tones he called for assistance from the motley   crew to avert the impending danger.   "The Bull-dog was the first...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TOBACCO WAR ADVERTISEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

TOBACCO WAR ADVERTISEMENTS.   The advertisements given out by Messrs. John   Haddon and Co., on behalf of the Imperial To-   bacco Company, recently represented probably   the largest sum ever spent on advertising by one   company in a single day. The amount is esti-   mated at £6000 to £7000. The advertisement ap-   peared in some one hundred newspapers.   In all cases a new kind of type was used, called   "Hawarden," after Mr. Gladstone's famous Welsh   home. Many of the newspapers had never ad-   mitted such large type into their advertisement   columns before. The stereos for the advertise-   ment were supplied by the advertising agents.   An attempt is said to have been made to block   the advertising scheme of the Imperial Com-   pany by their rivals, who had booked up lar...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT ARE "BEZOARS?" [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

WHAT ARE "BEZOARS?"   Bezoars are a kind of stone formerly in great   repute as medicines, and believed to neutralise   infection or poisons. They are sometimes found   in the stomachs of bulls and other animals, and   are simply concretions of indigestible matter,   often brown in color. One taken from a bull   at the Hacienda de Cruzea, Mexico, was chiefly   composed of vegetable fibres.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLEVER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

CLEVER. Little Effie (not at all inclined to go to sleep— to Nurse, who is about to switch off the electric light): "Oh, please, Nanna, don't turn on the dark!" —London "Punch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE REAL BITTERNESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE! REAL BITTERNESS. Mamma: "But, darling, why should you object to taking the good doctor's advice?" Bobby: "It isn't his advice, mamma; it's his horrid old medicine that I hate to take."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AUSTRALIAN BUSH FIRES. THE ENORMOUS LOSSES INVOLVED. SEVERAL MILLIONS A YEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

AUSTRALIAN BUSH FIRES.   THE ENORMOUS LOSSES INVOLVED. SEVERAL MILLIONS A YEAR.   What the prairie fire Is to America and Ca-   nada the bush fire is to Australia. The annual   losses to the State and the people in this direc- tion are enormous. And yet no effective methods seem to have been devised to prevent them. According to the officers of the Forest De- partment of Victoria, that State loses annually £1,000,000 in timber alone by means of bush fires. Add to this the great destruction of pri- vate property, the loss of grass, of fencing, of homesteads, of cattle, of sheep and horses, and the total must be swelled well on to £2,000,000. In the State of New South Wales, with her bigger area and wider possibilities for the un- controlled sweep of a fire once started, the loss must be even greater than that of Victoria. True, the fires that devastated Gippsland in 1898 were as big as any Australia has known since the celebrated "B...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TERRIBLE DISASTER AT PANJIM. A STEAM LAUNCH WRECKED. OVER 100 PILGRIMS DROWNED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

TERRIBLE DISASTER AT PANJIM. A STEAM LAUNCH WRECKED. OVER 100 PILGRIMS DROWNED. A telegram from Panjim (India) on December   9 announced the loss of over 100 lives through   the sinking of a steam launch on the River   Mandovy. The launch, which plies between   Verem Betim and Panjim, left the pier of Verem   a little before 7 a.m. with about 200 passengers   on board, many having been kept back for want of   room.   The number was unusually large owing to the   day being a feast day of the patron saint of Goa, St. Francis Xavier, and devotees from different parts were proceeding to Velha, Goa, to offer up prayers at the shrine of the saint in   the convent of Bom Jesus. About 10 minutes   after the steam launch had weighed anchor, it sank in the river just in front of the Lycene Nacoional. As can be easily imagined, the confusion was &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KISSED THE WRONG GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

KISSED THE WRONG GIRL.   Smith: "What happened to Johnson?"   Jones: "He was in a terrible railway accident   yesterday."   Smith: "You don't say so. Was he much   hurt?"   Jones: "No, fortunately he escaped with only   a few scratches on the face."   Smith: "Lucky fellow. How did it occur?"   Jones: "Well, in the tunnel."   Smith: "In the tunnel?"   Jones: "Yes. He kissed the wrong girl."    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BRASS BAND ON BICYCLES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A BRASS BAND ON BICYCLES.   It is New Zealand, that progressive colony,   that now claims to have started the first brass   band on wheels. This particular band of musi-   cians has its head-quarters at Christchurch,   and when wanted at any reasonable distance   from the home station promptly sets off on its   wheels, and not only plays to perfection when it   arrives at its destination, but also discourses   sweet music on the road. It consists of ten   members, and its chief is a Mr. Painter, who is   a musical artist of ability, and leads his ambu-   latory band about the towns of New Zealand,   where it has now become so common a sight   as no longer to attract attention.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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